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Venona Ten Years Later: Lessons for Today
History News Network ^ | 7-18-05 | Steven T. Usdin

Posted on 07/17/2005 5:58:36 PM PDT by Tailgunner Joe

Ten years ago, on July 11, 1995, the U.S. intelligence community held an extraordinary press conference at CIA headquarters to break the seal on one of the most closely held secrets of the Cold War. The world learned that starting in 1946 American cryptologists had cracked Soviet codes and read portions of thousands of messages Soviet intelligence operatives sent each other during World War II. Most of the cables decrypted in a program that came to be known as Venona, one of numerous codenames used to cloak its existence, were sent or received by the Soviet head of foreign intelligence.

Just as the ability to read Stalin’s spymaster’s correspondence dramatically altered the course of the Cold War, public release of the cables a half-century later altered our understanding of the dynamics of the conflict between the USSR and the West. Coupled with revelations from Soviet bloc archives, release of data gathered in the Venona program led to dramatic reassessments of decades of history. The revelations reverberated worldwide as members of the British, Australian and, above all, American communist parties who had protested their innocence were exposed as spies and liars. Two generations of Americans for whom the innocence of Julius Rosenberg and Alger Hiss was an article of faith were compelled to reconsider their mockery of those who had warned about widespread Communist espionage.

Venona not only produced lessons about the past -- it also illuminated issues that governments and the public are grappling with today, including the risks and benefits of the disclosure of intelligence, the dangers of bureaucratic tunnel vision, and the ease with which ordinary people will commit crimes to advance Utopian ideologies.

Venona was made possible because in 1942--during the darkest days of the war in Russia, when everything, including skilled manpower, was in short supply--Soviet code clerks produced and distributed to agents around the globe thousands of duplicate copies of “one-time” pads used to encrypt communications. As is clear from the name, the code tables were supposed to be used only once, and if this simple precaution had been heeded, the encryption system would have been impenetrable. But with Germans at the gates of Stalingrad, punctilious adherence to apparently arcane security rules must have seemed an unaffordable luxury. The chances of the shortcut being detected must have seemed vanishingly small.

The Venona secrets were disclosed at the July 1995 press conference largely as a result of prodding from the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, who learned of the program when he headed the Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy. The story of how a combination of extraordinary luck and tremendous talent led a small team working at a former girls’ boarding school outside Washington, D.C. to detect and exploit the opportunity presented by the replicated one-time pads has been described in several books, notably Harvey Klehr and John Earl Haynes’s Venona: Decoding Soviet Espionage in America (Yale University Press, 2000).

That first batch of Venona decrypts released a decade ago included cables between Pavel Fitin, the Soviet head of foreign intelligence, and his officers in New York describing the espionage activities of an American engineer codenamed “Liberal” who worked for the U.S. Army Signal Corps. These cables were among the first that the Army Security Agency (ASA), which was later folded into the National Security Agency, partially decrypted and shared with the FBI. It took the FBI a couple of years to discover that Rosenberg was Liberal, and another four decades for the National Security Agency to share with the American public the documents that removed all doubt that he was a spy.

A 1956 internal memo to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover revealed three major reasons why the Bureau didn’t reveal its smoking-gun evidence during the Rosenbergs’ 1951 trial. There was a fear that disclosing the existence of the Venona program could help the Russians minimize the damage to its U.S. spy networks. Although Hoover didn’t know it at the time, this concern was largely unwarranted because Fitin and his colleagues already knew a great deal about the Venona program. A Soviet spy was standing over the shoulder of an ASA code breaker when he decrypted the first cable suggesting that the Kremlin’s agents had targeted the Manhattan project, and Kim Philby, a Soviet agent who penetrated the top ranks of Britain’s foreign intelligence agency, had been briefed on Venona.

The second reason for withholding the decrypted messages from prosecutors resonates today. There is a world of difference between actionable intelligence and information that meets judicial standards of evidence. The FBI was certain Venona would, even if admissible, be useless in court. It was unlikely, the Bureau felt, that partially decrypted messages of unproved origin, peppered with codenames and euphemisms, would be considered dispositive. If the prosecution were permitted to show decrypted cables to a jury, the defense could reasonably argue that messages the government had failed to decipher could exonerate their clients.

There were also political reasons to keep Venona under wraps, especially in the 1950s. Republicans were attacking Democrats for coddling Communists and playing down the Red threat, while the Truman White House accused the GOP of red baiting. Publicizing documentation of widespread Communist espionage would have plunged the FBI into the middle of a superheated partisan debate.

While the intelligence value of keeping Venona secret is debatable – there was some value to keeping the USSR in the dark about precisely which cables had been decrypted -- the benefits that could have accrued from publicizing it are undeniable. Keeping the cables under lock and key prevented Americans from examining the evidence and forming their own opinions about the role domestic Communists played in bolstering Stalin’s power.

In a commentary published ten days after Venona was made public, Moynihan suggested that releasing the documents in 1950 would have convinced the Left of the reality of communist espionage, thereby heading off both the excesses of McCarthyism as well as the anti-anticommunism that distorted American politics for four decades.

Looking at Venona another decade later, it is also clear that secrecy obscured some realities that could have led to a much-needed assessment of the FBI’s competence to detect threats to national security. Although Venona was one of America’s greatest counterintelligence triumphs, the project was important precisely because it illuminated an equally immense failure. It revealed that a handful of Russians developed hundreds of sources who spied on President Roosevelt; provided real-time reports on the Manhattan Project, probably shaving years from the USSR’s effort to eliminate America’s monopoly on nuclear weapons; and gave the Red Army blueprints for everything from America’s first jet fighter to its most sophisticated radar.

Virtually all of the spies had been members of or were closely associated with the Communist Party. Many, including Rosenberg, were able to continue spying for years after they first came to the FBI’s attention as security threats. Spies who were fired from government jobs as security threats easily found work in the private sector that afforded access to even more valuable information. No one connected the dots. Russia’s spies thrived in the U.S. during World War II largely because the FBI and Army failed to grasp the nature of the threat. Hoover and his subordinates thought of domestic communists primarily as sources of subversion, not as espionage agents.

Perhaps the longest-lasting impact of the release of the Venona documents has been to transform the debate over Communist espionage in the 1940s into one that is all too relevant today. The pertinent question is no longer whether Americans spied, but rather how highly educated, intelligent men and women failed to comprehend the true nature of Stalinist communism, and why they were willing to risk their lives and imperil the security of their families, neighbors and friends to commit crimes on behalf of a foreign power opposed to the basic tenets of modern society. Answers to similar questions, regarding educated Muslims with experience of life in Europe and the U.S. like those who led the 9-11 and Madrid attacks, are essential to constructing a defense against 21st century terrorism.


TOPICS: Editorial; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: campuscommies; chambers; cia; codebreakers; coldwar; espionage; get2knowtheknack; hiss; manhattanproject; mccarthy; myvenona; philby; rosenberg; secrets; venona
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1 posted on 07/17/2005 5:58:37 PM PDT by Tailgunner Joe
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To: Tailgunner Joe

boy, you post some interesting threads!

i was just reading ann coulter's book "treason" today, and was absolutely dumbfounded by fdr's and eleanor's remarks when confronted with the spies in their employ.


2 posted on 07/17/2005 6:04:15 PM PDT by ken21 (it takes a village to brainwash your child + to steal your property! /s)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
Bravo, Joe!

See also Ann Coulter's Slander.

Full Disclosure: I was the first to mention her, let someone else follow the rule.

PS : Doesn't the same logic go double today, with Putin's resurgent nationalism, and China's saber-rattling?

No cheers, unfortunately.

3 posted on 07/17/2005 6:05:06 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: grey_whiskers
Hmm, someone else got in before me with a mention of A.C.

And I really, really meant Treason instead of Slander--it was just, umm, just the thought of all the juicy photos likely to follow that distracted me!

Honest!

4 posted on 07/17/2005 6:06:50 PM PDT by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: Tailgunner Joe

The pertinent question is no longer whether Americans spied, but rather how highly educated, intelligent men and women failed to comprehend the true nature of Stalinist communism, and why they were willing to risk their lives and imperil the security of their families, neighbors and friends to commit crimes on behalf of a foreign power opposed to the basic tenets of modern society.

We see the same types of people today in our own government.
We see them in ANSWER, PETA and the whole alphabet of leftist/green NGOs across the country.


5 posted on 07/17/2005 6:07:22 PM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
In a commentary published ten days after Venona was made public, Moynihan suggested that releasing the documents in 1950 would have convinced the Left of the reality of communist espionage,

I don't think anything could have convinced the left any more than it already knew. Many of the leaders of the left were already involved in espionage. Those that weren't, for the most part, thought Soviet espionage was a good idea. Moynihan was a good man, but he had a naively rosy view of the intentions of his fellow travelers on the left.

6 posted on 07/17/2005 6:07:51 PM PDT by ModelBreaker
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To: tet68

yes.

and it's even worse.

radical feminism is based upon communist movements:

the frankfort school, herbert marcuse, louis althusser, jacques lacan, michel foucault, etc.

betty friedan was a card carrying member of the u.s.a. communist party. gloria steinem worked for the c.i.a. in the european propaganda department after the korean war.

althusser murdered his wife, but the feminists still love him.

university educated feminists control american newspapers and tv.


7 posted on 07/17/2005 6:12:26 PM PDT by ken21 (it takes a village to brainwash your child + to steal your property! /s)
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To: nopardons; Txsleuth; Fudd Fan; Howlin; BlessedByLiberty; defconw; Timeout
Ping

No one connected the dots. Russia’s spies thrived in the U.S. during World War II largely because the FBI and Army failed to grasp the nature of the threat.

Failed or were part of???

8 posted on 07/17/2005 6:14:34 PM PDT by Just A Nobody (I - LOVE - my attitude problem!)
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To: ken21

bookmark


9 posted on 07/17/2005 6:16:17 PM PDT by chaosagent (Remember, no matter how you slice it, forbidden fruit still tastes the sweetest!)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
The pertinent question is no longer whether Americans spied, but rather how highly educated, intelligent men and women failed to comprehend the true nature of Stalinist communism, and why they were willing to risk their lives and imperil the security of their families, neighbors and friends to commit crimes on behalf of a foreign power opposed to the basic tenets of modern society.

The "left" is like an overwhelming tranquilizer. It numbs the senses and eliminates logical thought.

10 posted on 07/17/2005 6:16:48 PM PDT by Tula Git
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To: ken21
ann coulter's book "treason"

A MOST EXCELLENT book - power packed well documented info.

11 posted on 07/17/2005 6:16:50 PM PDT by Just A Nobody (I - LOVE - my attitude problem!)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
...Answers to similar questions, regarding educated Muslims with experience of life in Europe and the U.S. like those who led the 9-11 and Madrid attacks, are essential to constructing a defense against 21st century terrorism.

Do we forget the Chinese?

12 posted on 07/17/2005 6:18:09 PM PDT by LoneRangerMassachusetts (Some say what's good for others, the others make the goods; it's the meddlers against the peddlers)
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To: Justanobody

in ann coulter's "treason" president harry truman refused to believe the evidence that alger hiss was a communist spy.

amusing, actually not, that truman learned about the u.s. secret atomic bomb after joe stalin!


13 posted on 07/17/2005 6:18:22 PM PDT by ken21 (it takes a village to brainwash your child + to steal your property! /s)
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To: Justanobody

yes!


14 posted on 07/17/2005 6:18:49 PM PDT by ken21 (it takes a village to brainwash your child + to steal your property! /s)
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To: ken21
Glad you are enjoying the book. I could not put it down. She inspired me to do some research on my own. Several names are WELL known and active TODAY, or their descendants.
15 posted on 07/17/2005 6:21:32 PM PDT by Just A Nobody (I - LOVE - my attitude problem!)
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To: Justanobody

another good book, from which i derived the info above about gloria steinem. covers the whole post ww2 era:



10. The CHAIRMAN: JOHN J MCCLOY & THE MAKING OF THE AMERICAN ESTABLISHMENT
by Kai Bird (Hardcover - April 30, 1992)
Avg. Customer Rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars
(Rate this item)
Usually ships within 1-2 business days
Used & new from $7.98


16 posted on 07/17/2005 6:25:45 PM PDT by ken21 (it takes a village to brainwash your child + to steal your property! /s)
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To: Tailgunner Joe; All

I have to tell you, the story of Joseph McCarthy has had a profound influence on my life.

All my life, I heard what a terrible man he was, the wrongs that he did to people, the red baiting, intimidation, etc. I heard it from the history books, magazine articles and television documentaries.

I bought it hook, line and sinker. Fact.

Then, I read Ann Coulter's book. I just could not believe what she said was true, so I started digging on my own. I read all the books on that era I could manage, and got through about 15 of them in the past couple of years. I even went so far as to obtain the transcripts from the actual McCarthy hearings, just so I could see what was actually said.

You know what? Ann Coulter's analysis of those hearings fits the transcripts much better than anything I have heard before or read in any book. Then, I read "Witness". The typewriter thing got me.

Then I read the books on the Venona project, and it does turn out that McCarthy was right all along, as was Whittaker Chambers.

I now view McCarthy as a patriot, whose reputation was smashed beyond recognition. He bought our country time, I believe that.

And you see the tactics of the Left back then repeated nearly verbatim now. It is chiling to see.


17 posted on 07/17/2005 6:27:07 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Innocence seldom utters outraged shrieks. Guilt does." Whittaker Chambers)
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To: Tailgunner Joe

I think what will be most interesting is what we find out in another 40 or 50 years when papers from today are being released.


18 posted on 07/17/2005 6:27:44 PM PDT by wagglebee ("We are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom." -- President Bush, 1/20/05)
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To: Justanobody

If they weren't "part of," orders came from the top.


19 posted on 07/17/2005 6:30:09 PM PDT by Fudd Fan (fiat voluntas Tua)
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To: rlmorel

Good post. My experience re: McCarthy is exactly the same as yours.


20 posted on 07/17/2005 6:31:40 PM PDT by Rodney King (No, we can't all just get along.)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
Answers to similar questions, regarding educated Muslims with experience of life in Europe and the U.S. like those who led the 9-11 and Madrid attacks, are essential to constructing a defense against 21st century terrorism.

Did I miss the memo? They were educated in Western Hating American and European academia. They couldn't have gotten a more anti-western message in any madrassa in Pakistan.

21 posted on 07/17/2005 6:34:35 PM PDT by Lonesome in Massachussets (Deadcheck the embeds first.)
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To: Rodney King

I have to admit, even though I held the media and the left in reserve with a grain of salt, part of me said "Back then, things were different. The media didn't lie to us back then, only now..."

Boy, how naiive. I didn't feel betrayed, but I did feel like I had been fed a shovel of shiite growing up. I look at nearly everything I learned with a skeptical eye, now.


22 posted on 07/17/2005 6:34:52 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Innocence seldom utters outraged shrieks. Guilt does." Whittaker Chambers)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
"opposed to the basic tenets of modern society"

Perhaps because they were and are themselves opposed to the basic tenets of modern society? We always assume these people are just naive. In my experience, there is a kind of flipness that might charitably be traced to naivety, but that is a teenage version of the thing and readily passes. By the time people are this deep in it, they know what they are doing and like it. Anything is better than admitting they've been wrong, or worse still, that someone they have hated and smeared is a better man than they are.

23 posted on 07/17/2005 6:36:04 PM PDT by JasonC
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To: Lonesome in Massachussets

Good handle...don't be lonesome-there are more of us here than you think! Someday this state will change...someday....


24 posted on 07/17/2005 6:36:18 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Innocence seldom utters outraged shrieks. Guilt does." Whittaker Chambers)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
The pertinent question is no longer whether Americans spied, but rather how highly educated, intelligent men and women failed to comprehend the true nature of Stalinist communism, and why they were willing to risk their lives and imperil the security of their families, neighbors and friends to commit crimes on behalf of a foreign power opposed to the basic tenets of modern society.

I don't believe American "Liberals" failed to comprehend the true nature of Stalinist communism. I look on most of them as "Compassionate Communists". They embraced the goals of communism, while shying away from some of it's excesses. They may have decried some of Stalin's method's, but believed that the people were ultimately to blame . The people brought it upon themselves by their failure to accept. Blame the victim!

25 posted on 07/17/2005 6:37:22 PM PDT by F-117A
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To: ken21

Thats because they were invited spies.


26 posted on 07/17/2005 6:38:51 PM PDT by mthom
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To: tet68

They still don't.


27 posted on 07/17/2005 6:39:50 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Scratch a Liberal. Uncover a Fascist)
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To: ken21
Bookmark (for purchase)

Thanks for the recommendation ken.

28 posted on 07/17/2005 6:42:41 PM PDT by Just A Nobody (I - LOVE - my attitude problem!)
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To: ken21

That book knocked me out, as well.
Alger Hiss.
Never forget the name.
McCarthy - a gifted man who gave his entire reputation to save our country.


29 posted on 07/17/2005 6:43:42 PM PDT by mabelkitty (Lurk forever, but once you post, your newbness shines like a new pair of shoes.)
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To: ModelBreaker

I respected Moynihan.
Even more so when I learned he was not fooled by Hillary.


30 posted on 07/17/2005 6:44:47 PM PDT by mabelkitty (Lurk forever, but once you post, your newbness shines like a new pair of shoes.)
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To: Tailgunner Joe

Excellent article Joe. This is the kind of the thing that the mainstream media takes great pains not to share with t he masses. For the most part people still believe that the cold war was just paranoia.


31 posted on 07/17/2005 6:45:54 PM PDT by DouglasKC
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To: rlmorel

You and I came away with the same central points - McCarthy is a hero.
Can you recommend some goods books on him? I'd like to read them, as well.
She hit a home run with her analysis, and I'm glad she chose to correct the wrongs of Mr. McCarthy's historical record.


32 posted on 07/17/2005 6:47:51 PM PDT by mabelkitty (Lurk forever, but once you post, your newbness shines like a new pair of shoes.)
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To: Tailgunner Joe

In 1938/39 the French passed by courier directly to FDR that the Hiss brothers were Russian spies. FDR did nothing. The author has the gall to say McCarthy was excessive, odd he subscribes nothing to FDR.


33 posted on 07/17/2005 6:48:46 PM PDT by cynicom
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To: rlmorel

Read "Dish" by Jeanette Walls - you want to know about how the media lies and for how long? JFK should have been IMPEACHED!


34 posted on 07/17/2005 6:49:07 PM PDT by mabelkitty (Lurk forever, but once you post, your newbness shines like a new pair of shoes.)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
That first batch of Venona decrypts released a decade ago included cables between Pavel Fitin, the Soviet head of foreign intelligence, and his officers in New York describing the espionage activities of an American engineer codenamed “Liberal” who worked for the U.S. Army Signal Corps.

Well, that was certainly an appropriate code name...
35 posted on 07/17/2005 6:49:45 PM PDT by Virginia Ridgerunner ("Si vis pacem para bellum")
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To: Fudd Fan
Yah huh ... funny how the past couple of days have made
"our" late night session not seem so twilight zone-esq.

...orders came from the top.

Since the WH was crawling with 'em, I would say this is most probable.

36 posted on 07/17/2005 6:50:34 PM PDT by Just A Nobody (I - LOVE - my attitude problem!)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
The Venona secrets were disclosed at the July 1995 press conference largely as a result of prodding from the late Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, who learned of the program when he headed the Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy.

NEVER TRUST DEMOCRATS WITH NATIONAL SECURITY!

Moynihan taught the Soviets a lesson. NEVER reuse a one time pad. Sure as hell this lesson was noted and circulated by foreign intelligence and WILL NOT be repeated.

NEVER TRUST DEMOCRATS WITH NATIONAL SECURITY!

37 posted on 07/17/2005 6:52:04 PM PDT by Doctor Raoul (Support Our Troops, Spit On A Liberal Reporter)
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To: rlmorel

After seeing what the barking moonbats are doing in Minnecraponus, that undeniably confirmed that Joe McCarthy was indeed right.


38 posted on 07/17/2005 6:55:49 PM PDT by Fred Hayek (Liberalism is a mental disorder)
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To: rlmorel
He bought our country time,...
And you see the tactics of the Left back then repeated nearly verbatim now.

Who will be the patriot that buys us time, this time?

BTW, your tagline is most appropriate!

39 posted on 07/17/2005 6:56:06 PM PDT by Just A Nobody (I - LOVE - my attitude problem!)
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To: Tailgunner Joe

"There were also political reasons to keep Venona under wraps, especially in the 1950s. Republicans were attacking Democrats for coddling Communists and playing down the Red threat, while the Truman White House accused the GOP of red baiting. Publicizing documentation of widespread Communist espionage would have plunged the FBI into the middle of a superheated partisan debate."

Heaven forbid that word might get out that the Republicans were telling the truth!


40 posted on 07/17/2005 6:56:27 PM PDT by Sam Hill
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To: Tailgunner Joe
As I recall, the erudite beacon of all knowledge that is true and good in the United States, the New York Times, had great difficulty in determining that Stalin was murdering millions of innocent people in the Ukraine and elsewhere in the 30s.

It appears that they have not become any smarter in the past 80 years.

41 posted on 07/17/2005 6:56:31 PM PDT by Citizen Tom Paine (An old sailor sends)
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To: tet68
We see them in ANSWER, PETA and the whole alphabet of leftist/green NGOs across the country.

We also see them in the UN, with their constant striving for "social justice" which is code for 'from each according to his ability, to each according to his need', aka communism.

42 posted on 07/17/2005 7:03:38 PM PDT by Kay Ludlow (Free market, but cautious about what I support with my dollars)
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To: Tailgunner Joe

one of the saddest cases to come out that period was the husband of the editor of the washington post: phil graham husband of martha graham.

It was her newspaper, or rather, her dad's newspaper. Graham married into the family. He was groomed to take over the newspaper.

However, during the McCarthy period he was one of the few people who were advised of the contents of the Venona cables.

Never the less, he was unable to stop the Washington Post's attack on everything to do with McCarthy-because by that time the communists had convinced the media that McCarthy was a set up for a pogrom. They took what stalin attempted to do with the doctor's plot and applied it to the republicans in general people like nixon in particular. anyone who sided with McCarthy was immediatly suspect and definitely out.

For someone like graham the difference between the image and the reality was too much. after embarrassing himself with some extra marital flings he committed suicide.

The sad and crazy thing is that martha graham died after the release of the venona cables...but she never understood.


43 posted on 07/17/2005 7:03:42 PM PDT by ckilmer
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To: rlmorel
Walter Duranty was a Stalin apologist and wrote for the NYT...go figure. Comrade Durarty won a Pulitzer Prize that the NYT refuses, even today, to return.
44 posted on 07/17/2005 7:07:00 PM PDT by ncountylee (Dead terrorists smell like victory)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
Book referenced in the article: Venona : Decoding Soviet Espionage in America.

I've added this to my reading list.

45 posted on 07/17/2005 7:07:23 PM PDT by Rate_Determining_Step (US Military - Draining the Swamp of Terrorism since 2001!)
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To: ckilmer
by that time the communists had convinced the media ...

You do not have to convice your Komrades of anything.

46 posted on 07/17/2005 7:08:21 PM PDT by Just A Nobody (I - LOVE - my attitude problem!)
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To: mabelkitty

Unfortunately, there are not a lot of good books about him. I read "Joseph McÇarthy and the Cold War", "The Politics of Fear", "Nightmare in Red" and "Joseph McCarthy : Reexamining the Life and Legacy of America's Most Hated Senator". They all just pissed me off, except the last one, which was pretty good.

However, it was "Witness" that really turned the worm for me. After I read that, I read a couple of books on the Venona Project, and there are a few really good ones out there now.

You must read "Witness", then read up on Venona, and it really brings it all together.

I have to thank Ann Coulter's book for getting me on the path, though. If not for hers, I might never have gone that way.


47 posted on 07/17/2005 7:09:26 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Innocence seldom utters outraged shrieks. Guilt does." Whittaker Chambers)
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To: Justanobody

THAT is a great question!

WHO is going to buy time for us this time, with respect to the socialists, communists and islamofacists?

Who is going to be slandered for telling the truth?


48 posted on 07/17/2005 7:12:06 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Innocence seldom utters outraged shrieks. Guilt does." Whittaker Chambers)
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To: Tailgunner Joe
It revealed that a handful of Russians developed hundreds of sources who spied on President Roosevelt; provided real-time reports on the Manhattan Project, probably shaving years from the USSR’s effort to eliminate America’s monopoly on nuclear weapons; and gave the Red Army blueprints for everything from America’s first jet fighter to its most sophisticated radar.

Great post! The penetration of our country by the USSR is just shocking when studied. In return we did basically nothing until the late 1940's. If the CIA had not been established and the FBI not stepped up its efforts, who knows where it might have ended?

49 posted on 07/17/2005 7:22:42 PM PDT by Zack Nguyen
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To: rlmorel
Did Witness have a profound impact on you? I read it about two years ago, and it is in my personal top five of all time. Absolutely riveting, deeply moving book.
50 posted on 07/17/2005 7:24:28 PM PDT by Zack Nguyen
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