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To: Textide

I thought the Mayan civilization died off long before the Spanish arrived. Perhaps this is about that mysterious extinction of their culture.


50 posted on 07/25/2005 7:29:41 PM PDT by xp38
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To: xp38

I believe you're correct about the Mayan extinction before the Spanish came. It'll definitely be interesting to watch what he'll do with that.


52 posted on 07/26/2005 5:20:34 AM PDT by Textide
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To: xp38; Textide

Nope. The Mayans were still around - ARE still around! From the wikipedia:

The Itza Maya, Kowoj and Yalain groups of Central Peten survived the "Classic Period Collapse" in small numbers and by 1250 CE reconstituted themselves to form competing polities. The Itza kingdom had its capital at Noj Peten, an archaeological site thought to underlay modern day Flores, Guatemala. It ruled over a polity extending across the Peten Lakes region, encompassing the community of Eckixil on Lake Quexil. These sites and this region were inhabited continuously by independent Maya until after the final Spanish Conquest of 1697 CE.

Post-Classic Maya states also continued to thrive in the southern highlands. One of the Maya kingdoms in this area, the Quiché, is responsible for the best-known Mayan work of historiography and mythology, the Popol Vuh.

The Spanish started their conquest of the Maya lands in the 1520s. Some Maya states offered long fierce resistance; the last Maya state, the Itza kingdom, was not subdued by Spanish authorities until 1697.

The Itza Maya, Kowoj and Yalain groups of Central Peten survived the "Classic Period Collapse" in small numbers and by 1250 CE reconstituted themselves to form competing polities. The Itza kingdom had its capital at Noj Peten, an archaeological site thought to underlay modern day Flores, Guatemala. It ruled over a polity extending across the Peten Lakes region, encompassing the community of Eckixil on Lake Quexil. These sites and this region were inhabited continuously by independent Maya until after the final Spanish Conquest of 1697 CE.

Post-Classic Maya states also continued to thrive in the southern highlands. One of the Maya kingdoms in this area, the Quiché, is responsible for the best-known Mayan work of historiography and mythology, the Popol Vuh.

The Spanish started their conquest of the Maya lands in the 1520s. Some Maya states offered long fierce resistance; the last Maya state, the Itza kingdom, was not subdued by Spanish authorities until 1697.


53 posted on 07/26/2005 5:34:27 AM PDT by Little Ray (I'm a reactionary, hirsute, gun-owning, knuckle dragging, Christian Neanderthal and proud of it!)
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To: xp38

An apocalyptic epic with religious overtones sounds right up his alley.


57 posted on 07/26/2005 9:00:44 AM PDT by GraniteStateConservative (...He had committed no crime against America so I did not bring him here...-- Worst.President.Ever.)
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To: xp38
I thought the Mayan civilization died off long before the Spanish arrived. Perhaps this is about that mysterious extinction of their culture.

That's true of monumental high-Mayan culture, but there are still lots of ethnic Mayans around today.
76 posted on 07/26/2005 11:20:25 AM PDT by Antoninus (Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domini, Hosanna in excelsis!)
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