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NASA: No Flights Until Foam Issue Fixed
Associated Press ^ | 7/27/05 | MARCIA DUNN

Posted on 07/27/2005 6:09:10 PM PDT by anymouse

The shuttle Discovery, like Columbia, shed a large chunk of foam debris during liftoff that could have threatened the return of the seven astronauts, NASA said Wednesday.

While there are no signs the piece of insulation damaged the spacecraft, NASA is grounding future shuttle flights until the hazard can be fixed.

"Call it luck or whatever, it didn't harm the orbiter," said shuttle program manager Bill Parsons. If the foam had broken away earlier in flight, when the atmosphere is thicker increasing the likelihood of impact, it could have caused catastrophic damage to Discovery.

"We think that would have been really bad, so it's not acceptable," said Parsons' deputy, Wayne Hale. But he said early signs are Discovery is safe for its return home.

A large chunk of foam flew off Discovery's redesigned external fuel tank just two minutes after what initially looked like a picture-perfect liftoff Tuesday morning. But in less than an hour NASA had spotted images of a mysterious object whirling away from the tank.

Mission managers did not realize what the object was — or how much havoc it would cause to the shuttle program — until Wednesday after reviewing video and images taken by just a few of the 100-plus cameras in place to watch for such dangers.

Officials do not believe the foam hit the shuttle, posing a threat to the seven astronauts when they return to Earth on Aug. 7. But they plan a closer inspection of the spacecraft in the next few days to be sure.

"You have to admit when you're wrong. We were wrong," Parsons said. "We need to do some work here, and so we're telling you right now that the ... foam should not have come off. It came off. We've got to go do something about that."

The loss of a chunk of debris, a vexing problem NASA thought had been fixed, represents a tremendous setback to a space program that has spent 2 1/2 years and over $1 billion trying to make the 20-year-old shuttles safe to fly.

"We won't be able to fly again," until the hazard is removed, Parsons told reporters in a briefing Wednesday evening.

Engineers believe the foam was 24 to 33 inches long, 10 to 14 inches wide, and anywhere between 2 and 8 inches thick, only somewhat smaller than the chunk that smashed into Columbia's left wing during liftoff in 2003. Its weight was not immediately known.

It broke away from a different part of the tank than the piece that mortally wounded Columbia. After the accident, the tank was redesigned to reduce the risk of foam insulation falling off.

Discovery's astronauts were told of the foam loss before going to sleep Wednesday.

Parsons stressed that Discovery's 12-day mission was a test flight designed to check the safety of future shuttle missions. He refused to give up on the spacecraft that was designed in the 1970s.

"We think we can make this vehicle safe for the next flight," he said, declining to judge the long-term impact on the manned space program. "We will determine if it's safe to fly."

Atlantis was supposed to lift off in September, but that mission is now on indefinite hold. Parsons refused to speculate when a shuttle might fly again, but did not rule out the possibility that Discovery's current mission may be the only one for 2005.

He said it was unlikely that Atlantis would be needed for a rescue mission, in the event Discovery could not return safely to Earth and its astronauts had to move into the international space station. Discovery, fortunately, appears to be in good shape for re-entry, he said.

In addition to the big chunk of foam, several smaller pieces broke off, including at least one from an area of the fuel tank that had been modified in the wake of the Columbia disaster.

Thermal tile was also damaged on Discovery's belly; one tile lost a 1 1/2-inch piece right next to the set of doors for the nose landing gear, a particularly vulnerable area.

Hale said none of the tile damage looked particularly serious, and likely would not require repairs in orbit.

Imagery experts and engineers expect to know by Thursday afternoon whether the gouge left by the missing piece of tile needs a second look. The astronauts have a 100-foot, laser-tipped crane on board that could determine precisely how deep the gouge is.

The tile fragment broke off less than two minutes after liftoff Tuesday and was spotted by a camera mounted on the external fuel tank.

If NASA decides to use its new inspection tool to get a 3-D view of the tile damage, the astronauts will examine the spot on Friday, a day after docking with the international space station.

On Wednesday, Discovery's astronauts spent nearly six hours using the boom to inspect Discovery's wings and nose cap for launch damage. The wings and nose are protected by reinforced carbon panels capable of taking the brunt of the searing re-entry heat.

Hale said the laser inspection turned up nothing alarming, but the analysis is ongoing.


TOPICS: Government; News/Current Events; Technical
KEYWORDS: columbia; discovery; et; foam; nasa; shuttlediscovery; space; spaceshuttle
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Thank you Al Gore and the environazies.
1 posted on 07/27/2005 6:09:11 PM PDT by anymouse
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To: KevinDavis; Brett66

Space ping.


2 posted on 07/27/2005 6:09:37 PM PDT by anymouse
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To: anymouse
Thank you Al Gore and the environazies.

What I want to know is if Bush didn't have the balls to tell the greenies to take a hike on this one. If the Montreal Protocol is the reason the Shuttle has been grounded, heads should roll.

3 posted on 07/27/2005 6:13:19 PM PDT by Carry_Okie (The environment is too complex and too important to manage by central planning.)
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To: anymouse

The foam during the Columbia disaster was replacement over "environmental" issues. The original foam had not exhibited a tendency to break off. Have they reverted to the original foam, or are they still risking people's lives over Global Warming?


4 posted on 07/27/2005 6:14:11 PM PDT by the_Watchman
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To: anymouse

OK, what the heck has NASA been doing for the past two years? It is completely insane that the exact same problem that killed 7 on Columbia happened again. I thought they spent the past two years and millions this very issue. For it to happen again is beyond belief...what kind of shop are they running down there?

If I was the current crew, I would be furious that they allowed this to happen again. I realize that space travel is a very dangerous business and you can never be sure that nothing will go wrong...but at least fix known problems...just plain crazy.


5 posted on 07/27/2005 6:15:45 PM PDT by kyperman (Hows this for a face you love to hate.)
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To: anymouse

I just want to hear NASA confirm it followed the same procedures it always has to ensure that the tiles in this area were affixed properly. If that's true, either the glue maker or the tile maker is doing something different and wrong. If that's NOT true, NASA is doing something wrong.

Either way, someone needs to be bouncing on asphalt for this cockup.


6 posted on 07/27/2005 6:17:08 PM PDT by LibertarianInExile (Kelo, Grutter, Raich and Roe-all them gotta go. Roberts on+2 liberals off=let's start the show!)
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To: anymouse

Thankfully it didn't harm the orbiter. I'll reserve any furthur judgement until the mission is over. While I am confident the crew will return safely, it does no good to second guess anybody while we have a crew in space.


7 posted on 07/27/2005 6:19:10 PM PDT by rs79bm
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To: kyperman
"OK, what the heck has NASA been doing for the past two years?"

Spending over $1 billion.
8 posted on 07/27/2005 6:21:09 PM PDT by Shawndell Green (Mecca delenda est!)
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To: anymouse

The external tank is not available for inspection...this will not happen again.


9 posted on 07/27/2005 6:21:20 PM PDT by Fitzcarraldo
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To: the_Watchman
The foam during the Columbia disaster was replacement over "environmental" issues. The original foam had not exhibited a tendency to break off. Have they reverted to the original foam, or are they still risking people's lives over Global Warming?

NASA is an agency of the federal government - what do you think they are doing? /sarcasm

All they did was not pack as much foam between the ET bi-pod strut mounts. They also put some kind of mesh embedded in the foam.

It is still a crappy solution, hamstrung by blind obedience to pseudoscience that claims CFCs like Freon are significantly affecting the ozone layer in the upper atmosphere.

Never mind that the "ozone hole" is nearly closed up again due to global cyclic changes having nothing to do with CFCs or human intervention at all.

10 posted on 07/27/2005 6:21:40 PM PDT by anymouse
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To: kyperman
It is not the same problem, the area of the foam dislodging is not the same area as before and in fact this problem is due to (part of the) changes made to eliminate the original problem.

As in some problem solving, when you change the landscape to eliminate the gofer from digging a hole in your front yard, he may just instead dig one in the backyard.
11 posted on 07/27/2005 6:23:50 PM PDT by LM_Guy
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To: anymouse



http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2003/7/11/121741.shtml

http://www.watchblog.com/republicans/archives/000764.html


12 posted on 07/27/2005 6:24:25 PM PDT by spycatcher
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To: LibertarianInExile
OK, what the heck has NASA been doing for the past two years?

In short, consuming our tax dollars and producing nothing. NASA is worthless without a real challenge. They need a mission that is difficult enough to clear out the current layer of inept management while attracting new and capable talent.
13 posted on 07/27/2005 6:24:53 PM PDT by ARCADIA (Abuse of power comes as no surprise)
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To: LM_Guy
It is not the same problem, the area of the foam dislodging is not the same area as before and in fact this problem is due to (part of the) changes made to eliminate the original problem.

It looks the same to me. The old NASA would have redesigned the entire central tank, these guys can only apply a new layer of gloss.
14 posted on 07/27/2005 6:29:12 PM PDT by ARCADIA (Abuse of power comes as no surprise)
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To: anymouse
NASA is now kowtowing to the Enviro-commies? I wish we'd just scrap the whole thing.
15 posted on 07/27/2005 6:30:24 PM PDT by Jaysun (Democrats are motivated mainly and perhaps almost wholly by envy.)
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To: ARCADIA

Every mission brings experience. Every mission brings data there is no other way to get but by flying.

You dont think the next vehicle is not going to benefit from all those shuttle missions?

We learn by doing. There IS more then capable talent at NASA.

Bringing nothing? my god. Opening the door to the next frontier. Keeping America ahead and in the lead. Inspiring explorers to come.

It brings everything.

I know this because those brave souls that came before us are the only reason any of us are here. They explored with ships that they knew sometimes didnt come home. The flew on imperfect wings. And we owe the next generation what was given to us.

NASA has a new mission now. Return to the moon, then to mars. President Bush has put something in motion now that is unstoppable. Thank god.


16 posted on 07/27/2005 6:30:38 PM PDT by Names Ash Housewares
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To: ARCADIA
They need a mission that is difficult enough to clear out the current layer of inept management while attracting new and capable talent.

Since the engineers who can actually build working spacecraft seem to have retired, how about a new NASA mission to sabotage the Chinese manned space program by selling them shuttle technology (ala the Clinton Administration and Loral)? ;)

17 posted on 07/27/2005 6:30:40 PM PDT by Mr. Jeeves ("Democracy...will be revengeful, bloody, and cruel." -- John Adams)
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To: anymouse

WTF has been going on down at NASA the last TWO YEARS anyhow? What do you mean "until foam issue fixed"!!!!The foam issue crashed the LAST shuttle-and TWO YEARS later we've just kicked another crew up there "to see what happpens"!!!...but we'll fix the "foam issue" later. Sheeesh..what kind of astronauts we got that will put up with this @#ap!!


18 posted on 07/27/2005 6:30:56 PM PDT by mo
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To: anymouse

Just what is the Montreal Protocol?


19 posted on 07/27/2005 6:31:09 PM PDT by Sen Jack S. Fogbound
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To: anymouse
I`m sure some won`t like this but I have to ask,why are we wasting time and money on this thing?
If we as a country feel it is in our national interest to explore space,which I think is still open to debate,than lets do it.
Lets find a way to extract product (oil or other source of energy) from the Moon or Mars or gain a military advantage (we are the only country that does`nt seek to exploit or dominate from its military advances)so maybe it will be a deterrence to our enemies.
If the shuttle is`nt providing either and is imposing a human risk on top of a monetary burden than end it.
20 posted on 07/27/2005 6:32:39 PM PDT by carlr
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To: anymouse

If you think about it, with the EPA around, human space travel is no longer safe for the US. I guess we'll have to give over the exploration of space to a country that does not have to answer to the EPA.


21 posted on 07/27/2005 6:33:15 PM PDT by microgood
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To: mo

Looks like Bush hire Griffen to test the Shuttle team...they have flunked the test...


22 posted on 07/27/2005 6:33:22 PM PDT by Fitzcarraldo
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To: anymouse

I still love my '86 4Runner, but I'm not planning to take it into Earth orbit. Why are we still using old space craft in 2005? Did budget cuts have anything to do with a technology standstill? We went to the Moon and back (with a few really close calls) several times starting in 1969. That was 36 years ago.

I'd like to strap some environmentally friendly foam to Big Al and send him into orbit.


23 posted on 07/27/2005 6:34:44 PM PDT by auboy
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To: Shawndell Green

"OK, what the heck has NASA been doing for the past two years?"

"Spending over $1 billion."

Exploring Mars, exploring Saturn, Exploring Titan, exporing comets.

Improving the shuttle in many other ways.

Its a test flight. TEST being the operative word here.
They are all test flights really.
We learn by doing.

NASA fixed several areas, and now another has come to attention because of all the new cameras and photography now.



24 posted on 07/27/2005 6:35:07 PM PDT by Names Ash Housewares
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To: kyperman
OK, what the heck has NASA been doing for the past two years?

Astounding, isn't it. Never underestimate the inertia of a decrepit old incompetent federal bureuacracy. Never.

25 posted on 07/27/2005 6:35:43 PM PDT by AndyJackson
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To: LM_Guy

"It is not the same problem, the area of the foam dislodging is not the same area as before and in fact this problem is due to (part of the) changes made to eliminate the original problem.

As in some problem solving, when you change the landscape to eliminate the gofer from digging a hole in your front yard, he may just instead dig one in the backyard."

Thats true, I got about a whole family of those little buggers in my yard, I drive em out of one hole and they dig another one, lousy rodents....not unlike liberals is some ways....


26 posted on 07/27/2005 6:35:49 PM PDT by kyperman (Hows this for a face you love to hate.)
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To: anymouse

Prayers for their safe return.


27 posted on 07/27/2005 6:37:39 PM PDT by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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To: ARCADIA

"NASA is worthless without a real challenge. They need a mission that is difficult enough to clear out the current layer of inept management while attracting new and capable talent."

Nope. The whole NASA concept needs put out to pasture. Space and research in general need to go back to private hands. If government wants pure research done, it should explicitly describe the functions that research is for from which government could really benefit, name a price it's willing to pay toward such a goal or item, and award it to the first person to come up with a practical method or invention.

Even that is unlikely to be a Constitutional use of tax dollars. If the private market doesn't want to do it, it usually ain't worth doing.

And don't get me started on all that Texas and Florida real estate sitting there going to little productive use.


28 posted on 07/27/2005 6:38:30 PM PDT by LibertarianInExile (Kelo, Grutter, Raich and Roe-all them gotta go. Roberts on+2 liberals off=let's start the show!)
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To: anymouse
During the STS-87 mission, there was a change made on the external tank. Because of NASA's goal to use environmentally friendly products, a new method of "foaming" the external tank had been used for this mission and the STS-86 mission. It is suspected that large amounts of foam separated from the external tank and impacted the orbiter

http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/people/journals/space/katnik/sts87-12-23.html

29 posted on 07/27/2005 6:39:07 PM PDT by Retired Chemist
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To: Shawndell Green

"OK, what the heck has NASA been doing for the past two years?"

Spending over $1 billion.

Looks like they've spent that $1 billion on a bunch of new cameras to take higher resolution pictures of the foam insulation falling off to prove that the new foam sucks.
Funny thing is is that they already knew it fell off upon inspection of a shuttle after its return.


30 posted on 07/27/2005 6:41:33 PM PDT by diverteach
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To: LibertarianInExile
If the private market doesn't want to do it, it usually ain't worth doing.

The private market has never invested in raw research, or in massive new projects. NASA provides a vehicle to fund private research while shielding it from the legal risk of loss. How would you like to be the company footing the bill for the Columbia Disaster? Private can exploit technology and develop applications, but your overly idealistic if you think that it can tackle stuff like this.

Use NASA but fund it adequately to do the job; we do not need curators, we need innovation.
31 posted on 07/27/2005 6:50:46 PM PDT by ARCADIA (Abuse of power comes as no surprise)
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To: diverteach

The foam is just insulation to keep the fuel cold before lift-off.

A new design for the insulation factor is needed since it is clear that this flimsy-any-kind-of-other-foam-as-well design is too dangerous to the shuttle now (same problem was there for the first 100 flights though.)

Solid rocket booster instead, thicker tank, up-to-the-minute fueling, new vehicle are the only options really.

Will be a long time and lots of testing before she goes up again.


32 posted on 07/27/2005 6:51:50 PM PDT by JustDoItAlways
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To: Names Ash Housewares
NASA has a new mission now. Return to the moon, then to mars. President Bush has put something in motion now that is unstoppable. Thank god.

What's on the moon? For the billions spent going to mars, we could send robots to every planet in the solar system. Robots that do better measurements, robots that don't need life support. Robots that don't need to come home. Humans do nothing more in space than try to stay alive. For all the human exploration of low earth orbit we've had, we've got a "permanant" station in low earth orbit that does no science, and a shuttle that ferries people to the station where they do no science. Real science is performed by robots who've been *far* farther than humans, and done better science. All the true space explorers of the past two decades have been robotic.

If humans do any more exploration in space, it will be by carrying a robot measurement tool to a nearby planet that's already been visited by dozens of probes that carried themselves, setting it on the ground, and letting it do it's job... the science, while the astronaut poses for pictures. Oh, and for a greatly increased price.
33 posted on 07/27/2005 6:56:25 PM PDT by crail (Better lives have been lost on the gallows than have ever been enshrined in the halls of palaces.)
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To: anymouse

Here is a quick solution: go back to the OLD foam that didn't fall off and tell the envirowhackos to go kill a truck load of puppies.


34 posted on 07/27/2005 6:57:15 PM PDT by Blood of Tyrants (G-d is not a Republican. But Satan is definitely a Democrat.)
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To: crail

Griffen is going to have to get out the big axe if NASA is to be credible.


35 posted on 07/27/2005 7:00:36 PM PDT by Fitzcarraldo
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To: ARCADIA

"The private market has never invested in raw research, or in massive new projects."

Oh, PUH-LEEZE. Wilbur and Orville Wright. Thomas Edison. Leonardo DaVinci. Robert Goddard. See also Space Ship One, Paul Allen.

"NASA provides a vehicle to fund private research while shielding it from the legal risk of loss. How would you like to be the company footing the bill for the Columbia Disaster? Private can exploit technology and develop applications, but your overly idealistic if you think that it can tackle stuff like this."

If your argument is that lawyers suck, well, you're right. If your argument is that nobody innovates because lawyers suck, I refer you to the U.S. patent office. You're overly attached to NASA and government research money if you think private industry CAN'T tackle stuff like this.


36 posted on 07/27/2005 7:04:08 PM PDT by LibertarianInExile (Kelo, Grutter, Raich and Roe-all them gotta go. Roberts on+2 liberals off=let's start the show!)
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To: Sen Jack S. Fogbound
Just what is the Montreal Protocol?

Treaty signed by Reagan essentially banning freon whose patents had ended thereby giving Dupont a blank check to charge exorbitant prices for inferior chemicals while throwing a bone to enviro wacko's and placing a secret tax on all of us. What is known as a political win/win.

37 posted on 07/27/2005 7:06:40 PM PDT by Raycpa
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To: crail

We are obligated to give to the next generation the same step up as we inherited from those before. We do not have the right to NOT explore. It is inevitable anyways. It is our very nature to do these things. The horizon will always call us. And it is the reason why we are 6 billion strong today. Exploration is part of something so much bigger. It is at the core of humanity itself. We are compelled deep within to do so. People must go and see and touch for themselves. They must be there. Robotic exploration is part of the equation. Not the goal. The goal is far larger.



I could point to dozens of web pages about the benefits of
human space exploration, technologies developed and of lives saved because
of it, but you can easily find them yourself on google.

Im going to tell you what I think instead, and some comments from others that speak a little more to the heart that I find ring true.

One of my most convincing arguments for space exploration is the analogy that Earth itself is a spacecraft. Everything we learn about how to function and live in space applies directly to our spacehip Earth. How to recycle air, water, how to generate and use power efficiently, how to grow food in closed ecosystems. All of it is important. We learn by doing. There is no other way. All of this can benefit mankind in a world with a fast growing population. Understanding other worlds is how we understand OUR world better, to understand how it formed and where it is going. Its our only home for now.


"We must not cease from exploration, and at the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we began, and to know it for the first time."
T.S. Eliot


Astronaut Story Musgrave thoughts on the matter.....................

"Why Space, Why Explore?

We have no choice, Sir. It is the Nature of Humanity, it is the Nature
of Life

The Globe was created and Life Evolved, and you look at every single
cubic millimeter on this Earth, You can go 30,000 feet down below the
Earth surface, You can go 40,000 feet up in the air and Life is There.
When you look at the globe down there, you see Teeming Life Everywhere

It is the Power of Life, And maybe I am not just a Human up here, you
know. Now Life is Leaping off the Planet. It is heading to other parts
of the Solar System, other parts of the Universe

There are those kinds of Pressures. It isn't simply politics, it is
not simply technology, it is really not just the essence of humanity,
but it is sort of also, you could look at it as maybe the Essence of
Life. I think Teilhard de Chardin, in Phenomenon of Man, I believe he
put that incredibly well. So those kind of Forces are at Work. It is
the nature of humans to be exploratory and to Push On

Yes, it costs resources and it does cost a lot, and there is a risk,
there is a penalty, there is a down side, but Exploration and
Pioneering, I think those are the critical things, it is the Essence
of what Human Beings are, and that is to try to understand their
Universe and to try to participate in the entire Universe and not just
their little Neighborhood" -Story Musgrave


President Bush at the Columbia memorial at JSC................

"The cause of exploration and discovery is not an option we choose, It
is a desire written in the human heart."


And at the announcement of new American space policy...........

"Mankind is drawn to the heavens for the same reason we were once
drawn into unknown lands and across the open sea. We choose to explore
space because doing so improves our lives, and lifts our national
spirit."


38 posted on 07/27/2005 7:11:00 PM PDT by Names Ash Housewares
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To: crail

It isn't about just science or exploration, it's about figuring out a path towards settlement.


39 posted on 07/27/2005 7:12:46 PM PDT by Brett66 (Where government advances and it advances relentlessly freedom is imperiled -Janice Rogers Brown)
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To: RightWhale; Brett66; xrp; gdc314; anymouse; RadioAstronomer; NonZeroSum; jimkress; discostu; ...
Yep...


40 posted on 07/27/2005 7:13:22 PM PDT by KevinDavis (the space/future belongs to the eagles, the earth/past to the groundhogs)
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To: ARCADIA

They did not redeisgn the ET, just made some changes - added heaters, sheilding, camera, sensors, and cutaway some foam they thought they could do with out.


41 posted on 07/27/2005 7:26:08 PM PDT by LM_Guy
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To: kyperman

One way to look at it: our shuttle astronauts are safer in space in a damaged vehicle, than riding a London subway here on earth.


42 posted on 07/27/2005 7:27:37 PM PDT by Ciexyz (Let us always remember, the Lord is in control.)
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To: JustDoItAlways
A new design for the insulation factor is needed since it is clear that this flimsy-any-kind-of-other-foam-as-well design is too dangerous to the shuttle now (same problem was there for the first 100 flights though.)

I don't think so. We didn't have the problem until the enviros made NASA get rid of the original insulation - which never failed. Since the change, there have been failures on every mission.

You could look it up.

http://capmag.com/article.asp?ID=2942

43 posted on 07/27/2005 7:28:00 PM PDT by jackbill
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To: Names Ash Housewares
We choose to explore space because doing so improves our lives, and lifts our national spirit.

Not on the moon. There's nothing an astronaut could learn on our planned return the moon some 20 years from now that a robot couldn't learn today. I'm not saying don't explore, I'm saying stop exploring our backyard for such an exorbant price. The moon?!? We want to go to the moon?!? We have probes on mars, audio from saturn, photos from the other side of the universe, robots crashing into asteroids to kick up dust for other robots. That's not exciting enough??? Would pictures of men giving beautiful speeches on the moon be more exciting??? With the recent refocus, we're instead going to focus the money to have pictures of astronauts kicking up dust doing lunar "research." That money will come out of the science budget.
44 posted on 07/27/2005 7:29:33 PM PDT by crail (Better lives have been lost on the gallows than have ever been enshrined in the halls of palaces.)
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To: Fitzcarraldo
they have flunked the test

Griffin wants to junk the Space Shuttle and get to work on the CEV. Now.

45 posted on 07/27/2005 7:29:48 PM PDT by RightWhale (Substance is essentially the relationship of accidents to itself)
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To: LibertarianInExile

The Goddard and the Wright brothers were working on a military contracts. Edison worked on developing applications for existing science, and Da Vinci was employed by his Prince. Big raw reseach requires massive public investment, without Isabella,Colombus would never have crossed the ocean.


46 posted on 07/27/2005 7:34:55 PM PDT by ARCADIA (Abuse of power comes as no surprise)
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To: Ciexyz

The shuttle safety record is about 1 death per 12 flights.


47 posted on 07/27/2005 7:34:58 PM PDT by Fitzcarraldo
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To: Raycpa

Question? Is it in NASA's best interest to let the shuttle fail?


48 posted on 07/27/2005 7:37:58 PM PDT by Raycpa
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To: diverteach
The dings to the shuttle tiles were from ice, not foam. The new foam falling off is not really that bad but unfortunately it looks like it was caused from the changes made solve the problem for the original location.
A. 1 Billion was not for cameras
B. The area were most foam was falling off has been eliminated (so-far) this area is completely different
C. If my suspicion is right they will have to reverse a design change and instead add more heaters.
49 posted on 07/27/2005 7:40:17 PM PDT by LM_Guy
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To: crail

There is so much left do do on the moon. Practice for Mars. Radio astronomy on the far side. Learning how to live in space colonies. Extracting water and air from the soil. Learning to build shelters. Exploring our closest neighbor that we have scarcely trod on at all.

Watch "From the Earth to the Moon" Episode about Apollo 15 and Professor Lee Silver.


50 posted on 07/27/2005 7:40:45 PM PDT by Names Ash Housewares
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