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Texas hopes it's found bison to replenish herd
The Wall Street Journal ^ | Aug. 13, 2005 | J. LYNN LUNSFORD

Posted on 08/14/2005 6:59:30 AM PDT by Shawndell Green

Nearly wiped out in the 1800s, the purebreds' newer enemy is a century of inbreeding

QUITAQUE - Pushing a button that activates a feed dispenser on a trailer behind his pickup, Danny Swepston summoned a sound that nearly disappeared from the plains 131 years ago: The thunder of bison hooves.

"Here they come now out of those mesquite trees," said Swepston, who as a wildlife leader for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is responsible for these bison.

A stampede it wasn't. Fewer than 60 of the fur-covered, humpbacked animals make up the last purebred examples of the Great Southern Bison Herd, which once numbered more than 3 million and roamed throughout the Southwest. Unlike many of today's commercially bred bison, many of which have strains of cattle in their bloodline, the small herd here is a remnant of the bison that were hunted by Native Americans and buffalo hunters 150 years ago.

Protected purebreds As such, they are carefully guarded. They live in a protected park surrounded by 10-foot-high fences and get daily attention from an experienced herdsman. They have regular veterinary care. In extreme summer and winter weather, they get special feed. Despite the excellent care, the Texas herd is in danger of dying out.

The animals are suffering from a malady known as "inbreeding depression" because no outside genes have been introduced into the herd. Some of the bulls are less virile, the cows are growing older, and the number of calves that survive their first spring has declined. "Without new blood, this herd will fade away," said Swepston.

The plight of the Texas herd — and what officials are doing about it — has attracted the attention of some of the top bison geneticists in the world, and the interest of media tycoon Ted Turner, whose own bison herd exceeds 40,000 head.

Saved by a cattleman The Texas animals are important for several reasons. Besides their roots in the Great Southern Bison Herd, they are directly linked to one of the most important figures of the old West. Legendary cattleman Charles Goodnight, who helped establish the Goodnight-Loving cattle trail and open the plains to ranching, first saved the ancestors of these bison in 1874.

His wife, Mary Ann, was upset that buffalo hunters and disease had reduced the Great Southern herd to just a few hundred animals. Goodnight rounded up five orphaned calves and set them loose on 10,000 acres in the Palo Duro Canyon, in the Texas Panhandle. Eventually, the herd grew to 250 animals, with Goodnight frequently sending some of them away to help start bison herds elsewhere.

For 75 years after Goodnight's death, the herd wandered mostly untended in the canyon, where they were regarded by some as a nuisance because they tore up fences and destroyed crops.

The bison's fortunes improved when James Derr, an expert on bison from Texas A&M University's College of Veterinary Medicine, confirmed that the forgotten herd had a special history. The herd has been under the guardianship of the state since 1997, when officials moved it to a protected compound about 100 miles southeast of Amarillo, just outside the town of Quitaque (pronounced Kitty-Quay, according to a road sign welcoming visitors).

Looking for ancestors Scientists first suspected the herd might be in trouble in 2001 after doing DNA and pregnancy tests. They noted that 15 of the 18 adult females in the herd were pregnant, but when calving time came that spring, just one calf survived.

Derr and Natalie Halbert, a postdoctoral research associate at the college, were already involved in a project to sample DNA from several federal bison herds. They compared DNA from the Texas herd with their other samples and found "the Texas herd had significantly less genetic variation," said Halbert. In simple terms, the animals were headed down the road to extinction because they were all too closely related to one another. "In another 50 years, they'll all be gone if something isn't done," said Derr.

In a normal livestock herd, such problems can swiftly be cured by bringing in animals from elsewhere. But where do you go to find a pureblood example of a species that was close to extinction in the 19th century? Even though the number of bison in North America has been growing in recent years — their numbers are estimated at more than 350,000 — it was important for conservation reasons to find bison whose bloodlines could somehow be traced to the original Goodnight herd.

Turner to the rescue One of the most difficult challenges — obtaining blood and hair samples from beasts that weigh as much as 2,300 pounds and can run for hours at a time at 30 mph — had already been taken care of. For several years, Derr's team has spent its winters obtaining DNA samples from various federal and private bison herds.

In their search for eligible bachelors for the Texas herd, Derr's team discovered that the most obvious solution wouldn't work. The last free-roaming herd in the U.S., in Yellowstone National Park, was started in 1903 with the help of three bison from Goodnight's herd. But the Yellowstone herd is now infected with brucellosis, a contagious bacterial disease that disqualifies all those animals.

Derr began looking for other herds with healthy critters that have no traces of cattle DNA but that do have a historical link to the Goodnight herd.

His genetic sleuthing turned up the right stuff in New Mexico at Vermejo Park Ranch, Ted Turner's 588,000-acre getaway. That herd is indirectly related to Goodnight's herd because it was founded about 70 years ago with some bison from Yellowstone. According to Derr and Texas officials, Turner gladly agreed to donate three young bulls for the experiment.

Today, the Turner bulls are in a pen adjacent to the cows from the Texas herd. Recently, the Vermejo bulls peered warily at a visitor before retreating a safe distance. Unlike many of the bulls in the Texas herd, many of which are older, the new kids on the block have sharp horns and appear to be perfect specimens of bisonhood.

Later this month, after calving season is over, one of the Vermejo bulls will be allowed to "socialize with the Texas cows, to see how they get along," Derr says. Next year, officials will examine the DNA of any offspring to see whether the experiment has resulted in the genetic variety necessary to make the herd thrive. If so, the other bulls will be allowed to cross the fence next year.

Eventually, the offspring will be allowed to breed with cows from the original herd, resulting in a bloodline that is still mostly similar to the original Texas herd but with a dash of important diversity.

BISON BLOODLINE

• 1830: Bison populations are estimated at 30 million to 40 million, but their numbers begin to decrease as trading bison hides becomes more popular. • 1858: Disease wipes out the middle herd of bison, dividing the bison into a northern and southern herd. The two herds never join again. • 1866: Charles Goodnight attempts to start a herd with six bison but is unsuccessful. • 1876: Goodnight raises bison calves on his ranch in a successful effort to preserve them. J.A. Ranch was home to the bison for many years. • 1930 : American Bison Society and the government work to create eight national herds. • 1998: Last of the wild bison in Texas are captured from the J.A. Ranch and moved to Caprock Canyon State Park. These bison are descendants of the Charles Goodnight herd. Source: Texas Parks and Wildlife Department


TOPICS: Culture/Society; US: Texas
KEYWORDS: animals; bison; wildlife
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1 posted on 08/14/2005 6:59:31 AM PDT by Shawndell Green
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To: Shawndell Green

Nice story for a Sunday AM.


2 posted on 08/14/2005 7:08:57 AM PDT by PeteB570
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To: Shawndell Green

BTTT


3 posted on 08/14/2005 7:11:30 AM PDT by Fiddlstix (This Tagline for sale. (Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: Shawndell Green

Good news!


4 posted on 08/14/2005 7:14:46 AM PDT by hershey
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To: PeteB570

Believe it or not, Catalina Island out here in so. california had a very large free roaming bison heard. How you ask? They were brought over for a movie shoot in the 1920's and never rounded up. I dont know how many there are now but 30 years ago there were several hundred.


5 posted on 08/14/2005 7:16:54 AM PDT by Walkingfeather
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To: PeteB570
The one redeeming thing Ted Turner has done is his Bison ranching. Bison is great meat, better tasting and better for you than beef.

I am hoping that it continues to grow in popularity and starts supplanting beef as a product. I can only get it in specialty stores right now. Bison burgers are really good.

6 posted on 08/14/2005 7:17:57 AM PDT by dogbyte12
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To: Walkingfeather

They also had the wild boars from the movie still roaming the north side of Catalina island as well. I ran into one when I was camping on the north side of the island in the 80's.


7 posted on 08/14/2005 7:19:10 AM PDT by dogbyte12
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To: Shawndell Green

Good night, what a story!


8 posted on 08/14/2005 7:21:30 AM PDT by mtbopfuyn (Legality does not dictate morality... Lavin)
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To: Shawndell Green

This is a good work. The species should be saved for it's own merit but it also is true that bison is delicious. I live in a part of Connecticut (believe it or not) where I have a choice of three restaurants that serve bison and I am only 30 miles from a working bison ranch.


9 posted on 08/14/2005 7:23:10 AM PDT by muir_redwoods (Free Sirhan Sirhan, after all, the bastard who killed Mary Jo Kopechne is walking around free)
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To: muir_redwoods

Harvey Wallbanger Jr. BUMP!

Has anyone seen HW Jr? He is a show buffalo that does stunts and races and beats this old gray horse in a 200 meter dash. Pretty neat show to watch.


10 posted on 08/14/2005 7:25:51 AM PDT by BookaT (My cat's breath smells like cat food!)
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To: Shawndell Green

Am I the only one that thinks the breathless dithering trying to find "Goodnight bloodlines" to introduce back into this herd is stupid?

They act like it's a seperate species. The herd needs some diversity, but not just any diversity, it HAS to be more of the same diversity.

Why?


11 posted on 08/14/2005 7:32:37 AM PDT by Valpal1 (Crush jihadists, drive collaborators before you, hear the lamentations of their media. Allahu FUBAR!)
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To: dogbyte12

PETA = People Eating Tasty Animals

It should be a crime to overcook a good steak.

Best end for a cow or bison is sizzling on a hot grill.

Some salt, pepper and a loaded baked potato on the side. YumYum.

Save the rabbit food for the Vegans.


12 posted on 08/14/2005 7:37:10 AM PDT by PeteB570
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To: Shawndell Green
To me, it's more important to preserve the bison than to worry about one particular bit of history. For heaven's sake, get some strong bulls and breed them with the cows. I wouldn't care if they descended from the original herd or not, just that they were strong, healthy and got the job done. The expense to which they are going to get particular DNA is $$$ that could be spent on enlarging and caring for the herd. New healthy blood is going to work out better in the long run.
13 posted on 08/14/2005 7:37:50 AM PDT by Marty
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To: Valpal1

Why?

It was in the story. Other blood lines have been mixed with cow and are not pure bison.


14 posted on 08/14/2005 7:38:37 AM PDT by PeteB570
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To: Army Air Corps

Ping.


15 posted on 08/14/2005 7:45:27 AM PDT by tuliptree76 (I'm sailing on the wide accountancy.)
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To: Shawndell Green
Protected purebreds As such, they are carefully guarded. They live in a protected park surrounded by 10-foot-high fences...

Better protection than our southern border.

16 posted on 08/14/2005 7:49:39 AM PDT by CPOSharky (You are born cold, wet, and hungry. Things get worse, then you die.)
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To: Valpal1
Apparently it wasn't even "separate" until

1858: Disease wipes out the middle herd of bison, dividing the bison into a northern and southern herd. The two herds never join again.

What was the disease I wonder, besides lead poisoning?

17 posted on 08/14/2005 7:49:44 AM PDT by Dust in the Wind (I've got peace like a river. . .)
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To: muir_redwoods

Are you sure it was from purebreed stock? I heard real bison has a strongh gamey taste and kinda tough while those that are interbreed with angus cows have a smoother taste. I'm willing to say it was a mixed breed. Just my opinion.


18 posted on 08/14/2005 7:55:44 AM PDT by RedMonqey
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To: RedMonqey

Probably so but I don't care if it was Great Dane, it was delicious.


19 posted on 08/14/2005 8:10:06 AM PDT by muir_redwoods (Free Sirhan Sirhan, after all, the bastard who killed Mary Jo Kopechne is walking around free)
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To: Shawndell Green

If I remember my history, the division between the northern herd and the southern herd came about not by disease, but by the transcontinental railroad. For some reason the herds refused to cross the tracks and broke up into the two groups. I have seen the same reaction in cattle.

If we loose these, there are still large numbers of Wood Buffalo in Canada and Alaska.


20 posted on 08/14/2005 8:17:02 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Islam, the religion of the criminally insane.)
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To: tuliptree76

I have been to the State park at Quitaque many times. The heard is kept in a fenced area near the park's entrance. They are impressive and unpredictable critters.


21 posted on 08/14/2005 8:34:22 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: muir_redwoods

Bison steak is the most delicious meat I've eaten.

I marinade it 48 hours in the fridge in a mix of water, salt, pepper, garlic and oregano. Don't cook too long or you'll end up with buffalo leather.

The local tribe raised buffalo here a while back. It didn't work.


22 posted on 08/14/2005 8:35:09 AM PDT by sergeantdave (Member of Arbor Day Foundation, travelling the country and destroying open space)
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To: RedMonqey

It dpends on the age of the critter as well as the preparation of the meat. Some bison can be quite tender and flavourful.


23 posted on 08/14/2005 8:36:32 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: muir_redwoods

Enjoy. It doesn't matter to me either. If it tickles my tastes buds too I wouldn't question whatever is on my plate. That's why I enjoy Chinese food. I taste first and ask questions latter. LOL


24 posted on 08/14/2005 8:45:10 AM PDT by RedMonqey
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To: dogbyte12
Bison burgers are really good.

Just like beef, only beefier. My daughter presented me with a couple of steaks and some ground bison a few months ago, and I'm now a committed fan. But it is, indeed, fairly expensive, and obtainable only through the speciality distributors.

25 posted on 08/14/2005 8:47:01 AM PDT by Mr Ramsbotham (Laws against sodomy are honored in the breech.)
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To: Army Air Corps

Very true. Veal of whatever cattle is more tender than an old cow that can be tough as leather.

If you enjoy it, go with it. Life is short enough without some busibody telling you what to enjoy.


26 posted on 08/14/2005 8:49:34 AM PDT by RedMonqey
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To: Shawndell Green

Speaking of Bison; we're told now that cows are the biggest source of air pollution in California. So how is it that, in those pristine and pure utopian days of the "native american," there was no air pollution yet there were somewhere between 60-90 million Bison wandering the plains and prairies of middle America? Don't buffalos fart?


27 posted on 08/14/2005 8:50:58 AM PDT by TigersEye
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To: RedMonqey

LOL!


28 posted on 08/14/2005 8:53:11 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: TigersEye

The Greens are basically opposed to anyhting that makes life better for humankind. Cattle are a source of food for most people. For the Environuts, that is bad. If humans are well-fed, then they might be, Horrors!, healthy and multiply. Also, anyhting pursued by modern man is mucho evil in the eye of the Environuts.


29 posted on 08/14/2005 8:56:03 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar

Cute story but aren't you forgetting about gullies and rivers and overland bridges?


30 posted on 08/14/2005 9:04:08 AM PDT by Old Professer (As darkness is the absence of light, evil is the absence of good; innocence is blind.)
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To: Army Air Corps

Well I love beef but buffalo IS better. I was just thinking we could solve the pollution problem (shutting up the nutcakes), have better dinners and, as a bonus, we would have buffalo everywhere instead of cows. I figure that would be a bonus because it would be a nice tribute to the 'first Americans' and a retro way of paying homage to the uniqueness and abundance of this continent which we call home. Much lower cholesterol too.


31 posted on 08/14/2005 9:05:07 AM PDT by TigersEye
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To: TigersEye

The EPA wasn't invented at the time.


32 posted on 08/14/2005 9:05:22 AM PDT by Old Professer (As darkness is the absence of light, evil is the absence of good; innocence is blind.)
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To: TigersEye

The nuts would continue to b*tch because Buffalo to flatulate and it would involve eating a critter.

I'd eat buffalo just to p*ss them off.


33 posted on 08/14/2005 9:08:05 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: Old Professer

There was no need for it because everything was pure, clean and wholesome at that time.


34 posted on 08/14/2005 9:10:20 AM PDT by TigersEye
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To: Walkingfeather

If he's still alive they should go get the renegade bull that lived above the quary and made a practice of challanging vehicles and pushing them over the cliff into the ocean. Last time I saw him was over 30 years ago.


35 posted on 08/14/2005 9:11:08 AM PDT by dalereed
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To: Army Air Corps
They couldn't complain about eating buffalo because that
would be a very deeply racist insult to Native Americans.
36 posted on 08/14/2005 9:12:19 AM PDT by TigersEye
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To: TigersEye

Only american Indians would get a "pass". Non-Indians would be accused of the usual crap. To the enviro nuts, logic is meaningless, ideology (e.g. anything pursued in western civilisation short of reversion to paleolithic livig) is bad. The enviros would complain that only the Native Americans were "in tune with Mother Earth" and knew how to "take only what they needed" and other myths.


37 posted on 08/14/2005 9:18:24 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: Shawndell Green

When the chips are down, the buffalo is empty.

Until the white man, buffalo were the masters of the Plain.

wiz = Sound on prairie, made by buffalo.


38 posted on 08/14/2005 9:26:14 AM PDT by wizr (Freedom ain't free.)
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To: Army Air Corps
I forgot one word "To the enviro nuts, logic is meaningless, ideology (e.g. anything pursued in western civilisation short of reversion to paleolithic livig)is everything."
39 posted on 08/14/2005 9:27:23 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: Army Air Corps; TigersEye

Ahhh, the noble red man on his horse crossing the plains covered in thick praire grass.

Too bad that didn't happen until the Spanish brought the hourse over with them in the 1500s.


40 posted on 08/14/2005 9:33:08 AM PDT by PeteB570
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To: Army Air Corps

You're really fighting me on this. OK, we will have to make some concessions in political principles then. A little affirmative action giving Indians preference in jobs working with bison and a certain percentage of all bison profits will go to support the BIA. If the wackos oppose that they will be totally politically incorrect and exposed for the completely anti-social misfits that they are.


41 posted on 08/14/2005 9:34:52 AM PDT by TigersEye
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To: PeteB570

Imagine how many buffalo there were before they had horses to hunt them!? The air must have been blue with Prairie Perfume.


42 posted on 08/14/2005 9:36:35 AM PDT by TigersEye
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To: PeteB570
That, and archaeologists and historians point-out that Indians did not "take only what they needed". Paleo-indians often killed scores more bison than they needed due to their hunting practices. Also, Indians helped in the near extinction of the buffalo in the late 19th century. Photographs and documents from the period indicate that Indians hunted buffalo for their pelts so that they could use them as trade goods. Often, the carcasses were stripped of the hides and the meat was left on the carcasses.
43 posted on 08/14/2005 9:37:50 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: TigersEye

LOL!

Really, I understanf what you are trying to say. The problem is that appeasing the left consists of becoming completely leftist. They constantly move the bar until you become one of them. Screw appeasing them; live and do as a free man.


44 posted on 08/14/2005 9:39:42 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: TigersEye

"completely anti-social misfits"

I think that is the best summary of the Left that I have read in a long time.


45 posted on 08/14/2005 9:41:28 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: Army Air Corps
Ungh. Ride horse, kill Tatanka, eat raw liver!
Hoka hey, today's a good day to grill!!!

[Vegetarian: Lakota dialect; lousy hunter.]

46 posted on 08/14/2005 9:45:27 AM PDT by TigersEye (Appeasement is not the answer.)
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To: TigersEye

ROFLMAO!

That's funny right there, I don't care who you are.


47 posted on 08/14/2005 9:49:28 AM PDT by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: Army Air Corps
TE: "completely anti-social misfits"

I think that is the best summary of the Left that I have read in a long time.

Thank you. If you'd like to read more of a dissertation about them take a look at this...
What causes fanaticism and why it is dangerous.

48 posted on 08/14/2005 9:51:55 AM PDT by TigersEye (Appeasement is not the answer.)
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To: PeteB570
I ate a chunk of one of these critters last time I was in Salt Lake City.. Very Tasty.. Very red and sweet. No fat and a little hard to cut with a fork.
49 posted on 08/14/2005 9:53:40 AM PDT by primatreat (without diabeties research, I would be a childless, old man with no purpose. Sort of like PETA peopl)
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To: Army Air Corps

Git 'r grilled. ;^)


50 posted on 08/14/2005 9:54:44 AM PDT by TigersEye (BBQ is the answer. Might be steaks, might be Islamo-fascists, that's the answer.)
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