Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

'There's Something Bottomless About It' - Robert Spano on Conducting Wagner's Ring
Atlanta Journa-Constitution via Andante ^ | September 15, 2005 | Pierre Ruhe

Posted on 09/18/2005 5:55:05 PM PDT by sitetest

Robert Spano is zooming along in his life as a conductor, the lights all turning green.

Tonight in Symphony Hall, he conducts Mahler's monumental "Resurrection" Symphony and begins his fourth season as music director of the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra — a partnership that increasingly draws national praise.

Robert Spano (photo courtesy of the Atlanta Symphony) Spano comes off a summer at the Seattle Opera, where he led Wagner's four-opera, 16-hour Ring cycle. After more than two months of rehearsal, he led the cycle three times over three weeks — and calls it a life-changing experience. A sign of success: He's already been invited back to Seattle to conduct the Ring in 2009.

We recently caught up with the 44-year-old conductor in a Midtown coffee shop.

Q: You received mostly glowing reviews for your first Ring. How did you feel about it?

A: It felt like a huge marker in my life. Not just as a conductor but as a human being. I feel like a different person. I'm altered and I'm grateful.

Q: What was so transformative?

A: For one thing the physicality, the athleticism of the Ring. In rehearsal, the first time we did Rheingold [Part 1 of the Ring saga] was the first time in my life I've had to conduct for 2½ hours without stopping. I made a point of not getting tired. I quit smoking, which I'd started at 17. I was going to the gym, doing Pilates. I went on a six-meal-a-day eating regimen, smaller meals. I took it very seriously. During the performances, I didn't get tired at all, didn't even think about it. But at intermission, and this was unusual, I'd be completely exhausted, physically and mentally. Sometimes I'd walk into my dressing room and have to lie on the floor to regroup, just so I'd have the energy to continue.

The other thing I hadn't expected, in the two years I spent in serious study [of the Ring score], was that everything took me twice as long to learn as usual. That terrified me. I'm usually a pretty quick study. Here I had to learn a whole new musical language — Wagner's language — which I'd been avoiding most of my life. No matter how hard I studied, I always had a thousand pages to go.

There is something bottomless about the Ring; it's such a vast and strange world. Fifty years before Freud and psychoanalysis, Wagner had it in the Ring. It goes very deep. Everyone who really knows the Ring will tell you that. But until you're inside it yourself, you can't quite imagine how such a thing could be true.

Conducting the Ring also, and this was really fascinating to me, warped my sense of time and space. Act 1 of Götterdämmerung [the fourth Ring opera] is two hours, which is as long as all of [Puccini's] Madama Butterfly, but I thought about it like 'an act of opera,' not in time but as units.

For long stretches I felt like I wasn't in my own body. I felt like I was growing with each performance, more than I'd grown in my entire life of conducting. It was amazing. And ridiculous, in a wonderful way.

Q: Did you take a nice break after Seattle?

A: No, I came right back to Atlanta to start preparing for the new season. I'll admit my first few days back I wasn't too functional. I'm not taking any vacation this year, but next fall [2006] I'm taking a chunk of time off, to compose. I have several pieces I need to finish, and this summer made me all the more aware that composing is a part of my life that I have to pursue. As a kid, when I was 12, I thought of myself as a composer, but later sort of fell into conducting. It's clear to me that returning to composition is something I have to do.

Q: You open the ASO season with Mahler's Second Symphony. It's only about 80 minutes long. Does that now feel short to you?

A: He's the opposite of Wagner; it's so concentrated and focused. Mahler, no fool, gave us a clue to music and meaning, the eternal question. Mahler quotes from Act 2, Scene 2 of Walküre [the second Ring opera]. It's a loveless scene where convention and society choke-hold creativity and the loving possibilities of the individual. I was blown away when I realized that connection. I love that I better understand Wagner through the eyes of his descendants, like Mahler.

Q: Will Atlanta ever share in your Wagner revelations?

A: I'd love to do Tristan und Isolde [with the ASO], maybe done in separate acts, maybe just a single act. That's an opera I have always loved. It's a long way away, but we might be able to pull it off.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: classicalmusic; mahler; music; opera; ring; wagner
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-61 next last
I can't imagine the effort it takes to do this.
1 posted on 09/18/2005 5:55:11 PM PDT by sitetest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: sitetest

The Mahler 2nd is no walk in the park, either.


2 posted on 09/18/2005 5:55:52 PM PDT by Sans-Culotte ("...on Earth, as it is in TEXAS")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sitetest; 1rudeboy; 31R1O; afraidfortherepublic; Argh; Bahbah; bboop; BeerForMyHorses; ...

Classical Music Ping List ping!

This is a moderate volume ping list, typically several times per week to one per day or so. Let me know if you want on or off the list via FR mail. Thanks!


3 posted on 09/18/2005 5:57:05 PM PDT by sitetest (If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sitetest
Wagner stole the ring idea from Tolkien.;-)
4 posted on 09/18/2005 5:58:26 PM PDT by js1138 (Great is the power of steady misrepresentation.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: js1138

* snicker *


5 posted on 09/18/2005 6:01:30 PM PDT by sitetest (If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Sans-Culotte
The Mahler symphonies are often overlooked by classical music fans. They are definitely worth the effort to appreciate as they grow on you over time.

On the other hand, it would take a lifetime to fully appreciate the music of Wagner.

6 posted on 09/18/2005 6:01:43 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (What Would Howard Roarke Do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: js1138
Wagner stole the ring idea from Tolkien.;-)

Stupid ring. Bad idea

7 posted on 09/18/2005 6:13:17 PM PDT by SauronOfMordor (Never try to teach a pig to sing -- it wastes your time and it annoys the pig)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Sans-Culotte
I have performed the Mahler Second (here in San Diego, with the chorus) and am about to do so again, in November.

It's good but overrated.

Give me the B-minor Mass anytime.

As for Wagner and Der Ring des Niebelungen, let me recommend Anna Russell.

8 posted on 09/18/2005 6:16:03 PM PDT by Chairman Fred (@mousiedung.commie)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: sitetest
For those who don't have the time or money, the entire Ring cycle is explained on this album.


9 posted on 09/18/2005 6:18:14 PM PDT by js1138 (Great is the power of steady misrepresentation.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: sitetest

With Wagnerian operas --- You don't have to watch. Just close your eyes and listen and feel.


10 posted on 09/18/2005 6:24:10 PM PDT by Exit148 (Founder of the Loose Change Club. Every nickle and dime counts!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: js1138

I couldn't agree more.


11 posted on 09/18/2005 6:26:13 PM PDT by Chairman Fred (@mousiedung.commie)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Sans-Culotte

Yes, but after the Ring, it's no thousand mile journey either.


12 posted on 09/18/2005 6:29:37 PM PDT by Panzerlied ("We shall never surrender!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: js1138
Wet me expand on my comment: if you weawwy want to know Wagner, just watch "What's Opera, Doc?" stawwing Bugs Bunny and Ewmew Fudd.

"Kill the Wabbit, Kill the Wabbitt, Kill the Wabbit, uh-uh-uh-uh-uh-uh!"

13 posted on 09/18/2005 6:33:30 PM PDT by Chairman Fred (@mousiedung.commie)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Chairman Fred
Well, we cannot all have the same tastes. Mahler is definitely an acquired one, and there are some of his symphonies even I am not really into. However, the 2nd "Resurrection" Symphony cannot be rated highly enough IMO. Though an early work, I always regard it as Mahler's "Beethoven's Ninth".

I agree with all that The Ring is a mighty work. I'm just not always in the mood for a 4 night opera festival. They are certainly something, though.

I only mentioned the Mahler 2nd because the article said that was on the conductor's agenda, and then said little about it. There are so many high points in Mahler's 2nd, that it is very easy for a conductor (and orchestra and solosists and chorus) to fail to hit them all just right. I've been to two live performances of it, and both were tremendously exciting.

14 posted on 09/18/2005 6:42:59 PM PDT by Sans-Culotte ("...on Earth, as it is in TEXAS")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: sitetest

P*S televised the Ring over a week several years ago. Four operas later I was drained. It was in my dreams. Conducting it, and above all making the whole thing come together, must take a very special person...like me. I'd love to do it :)


15 posted on 09/18/2005 6:44:11 PM PDT by cloud8
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sitetest

If bottomless means the same as never-emdimg, I certain;y agree.


16 posted on 09/18/2005 6:46:31 PM PDT by Socratic (Liberal's motto: Capio ergo sum.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SamAdams76

Mahler's 1st is my absolute favorite...


17 posted on 09/18/2005 6:50:36 PM PDT by Born Conservative ("I'm expecting that some people who are die-hards will die hard.'' -NOLA parish president)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Chairman Fred

I stood in line for the Seattle Opera a couple of years ago and the whole dang crowd started singing "Kill the Wabbit, Kill the Wabbit, Kill the Wabbit, the Wabbit must die..." Hope none of the cast heard us...


18 posted on 09/18/2005 6:51:15 PM PDT by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: sitetest

I'll contribute a dissenting view. I have grown to like Mahler and now really enjoy many of the symphonies. I have never liked Wagner with the exception of the Ride of the Valkyries theme used in Apocalypse now.

Saw a special on Discovery/Times network the other day (I know, I know). It was on occultism in the 3rd Reich. It was actually quite good and made many points not all of them can I summarize here.

One point it made however, was that Hitler was heavily influenced by Wagner - it might not be an overstatement to say that Nazism was the product of Wagner's aryan mysticism and Hitler's take on all of it. All the top Nazi's saw themselves as Aryan or Nordic knights that were going to find the grail or some such nonsense - all right out of Wagner. I'm sure intelligent people can differ but for me it just reinforced my already strong predisposition to not like Wagner.


19 posted on 09/18/2005 6:52:25 PM PDT by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten (Is your problem ignorance or apathy? I don't know and I don't care.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
Woody Allen once said that listening to Wagner made him want to invade Poland. Racial theories like those that Wagner held were a product of the time and he was simply the most gifted exponent of them. Though he wanted Jews to assimilate quite unlike the Nazis. There were petitions to expel Jews from Germany going around that he refused to sign. At the end of his life he personally picked a Jewish conductor named Hermann Levi to conduct the premiere of Parsifal.
20 posted on 09/18/2005 6:58:39 PM PDT by Borges
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Borges

Interesting.

I was not really trying to cast Wagner the man as good or evil, more trying to make the point that his operas were a jumping off point for the hodge-podge of racism, mythology, occultism, and cultural trope that was Nazism.

In short, Wagnerism begat Nazism. (or so it would appear from the documentary that I saw and other anecdotal information I have read from time to time).

There is a guy at work that I have not liked for a long time. Recently I found out he was a prominent democrat in the local party. So I said to myself, great, I already don't like the guy, now I have a whole other reason to not like him :)

I feel the same about Wagner. I already didn't like him. Now I have another reason not to.


21 posted on 09/18/2005 7:06:46 PM PDT by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten (Is your problem ignorance or apathy? I don't know and I don't care.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Blue Highway

ping


22 posted on 09/18/2005 7:12:32 PM PDT by perfect stranger ("Hell Bent for Election" by Warburg)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
Wagner was an thiest fascinated by the occult and Germanic mythology throughout most of his career. He was, for a long time, a close friend of Frederich Nietzche (sp?). Apparantly Wagner had a falling out with Nietzche and found God late in life, and subsequently wrote Pasrsifal as a redemption-seeking work.
23 posted on 09/18/2005 7:26:11 PM PDT by Morgan's Raider
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: Morgan's Raider

Also interesting.

As I type I'm listening to Mozart's Great Mass in C minor at a reasonably loud volume.

Words cannot begin to describe it.

That's what does it for me, anyway.


24 posted on 09/18/2005 7:32:54 PM PDT by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten (Is your problem ignorance or apathy? I don't know and I don't care.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Morgan's Raider
Wagner was an thiest fascinated by the occult and Germanic mythology throughout most of his career. He was, for a long time, a close friend of Frederich Nietzche (sp?). Apparantly Wagner had a falling out with Nietzche and found God late in life, and subsequently wrote Pasrsifal as a redemption-seeking work.

For a good laugh, you should listen to Nietzsche's music; I have a CD of some music he wrote while he was still friendly with Wagner. According to the story I heard, Wagner had to leave the room to hide his guffaws when Nietzsche was playing his new music for the first time on Wagner's piano. Nietzsche certainly had no talents as a music composer, to put it mildly.

25 posted on 09/18/2005 7:50:12 PM PDT by Vast Buffalo Wing Conspiracy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
Saw a special on Discovery/Times network the other day (I know, I know). It was on occultism in the 3rd Reich. It was actually quite good and made many points not all of them can I summarize here.

Cable TV programs (Discovery, History Channel, etc) are a horrible way to learn about history. Their documentaries are simplistic at best, and often repeat a lot of misinformation, half truths, and downright untrue information. The subject of "Nazis and the Occult" is an especially kooky field overly ripe with questionable assertions and assumptions. These occult ideas were certainly "out there" in the culture back then (just as they are now) but their influence is grossly overestimated. Even gross frauds like Ravenscroft's "Spear of Destiny" are uncritically accepted as factual. Separating fact from fiction in this area isn't easy, and these cable TV documentaries don't give the viewer any hint about the problems and complexities involved in sifting the evidence. It's good entertainment, but not necessarily good history.

26 posted on 09/18/2005 7:57:01 PM PDT by Vast Buffalo Wing Conspiracy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Socratic

LOL.


27 posted on 09/18/2005 8:14:47 PM PDT by sitetest (If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Billthedrill
... the Seattle Opera a couple of years ago and the whole dang crowd started singing "Kill the Wabbit,...I attended the Seattle Symphony 'way back in the sixties when they played Walton's Belshazzar's Feast for the first (and probably last) time - a third of the audience walked out - a tough crowd, those Seattlites......
28 posted on 09/18/2005 8:59:04 PM PDT by Intolerant in NJ
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: sitetest

BUMP!


29 posted on 09/18/2005 9:04:46 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Vast Buffalo Wing Conspiracy

As a fairly knowledgable person about history I feel able to filter such cable TV shows through the prism of what I already know from other sources. I would say that taking any single source at face value is always hazardous be it book, movie, TV show or anecdote. I think if you've read dozens if not hundreds of books on the general subject of WWII history in particular and 20th century in general, the hazard is not nearly so great. Nobody produces an historical work without wanting to express an historical opinion - that's why people do history. The only thing one can do is to put all the sources into a pot and stir well - hopefully what emerges is at least an approximation to the "truth".


30 posted on 09/18/2005 9:05:13 PM PDT by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten (Is your problem ignorance or apathy? I don't know and I don't care.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Intolerant in NJ

FWIW the symphony has really improved (I think) under Gerard Schwartz, whatever the London Symphony Orchestra may think of him. Benaroya Hall turned out to be an incredible venue. Nobody walks out these days...


31 posted on 09/18/2005 10:22:51 PM PDT by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: sitetest

Great post, thanks. Almost makes we want to listen to Wagner. Mahler, yes, any time. Wagner still seems awfully heavy to me...I'll have to try again.


32 posted on 09/19/2005 4:42:18 AM PDT by Republicanprofessor
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: sitetest
The Ring is like a Cricket Test Match.
33 posted on 09/19/2005 4:44:22 AM PDT by Shazbot29 (Trolling member of the DU Activist Corps!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sitetest

It's only rock and roll.


34 posted on 09/19/2005 4:47:16 AM PDT by Lazamataz (Islam is merely Nazism without the snappy fashion sense.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sitetest

You have to be genius level to be a good conductor. Same way Emeril is a genius. His show is boring cliché to me but last night I relaxed and noticed how smoothly he "orchestrated". You try cooking and talking and ten other things at the same time!


35 posted on 09/19/2005 4:52:54 AM PDT by dennisw (If you can serve a cup of tea right, you can do anything. - Gurdjieff)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Lazamataz

And tell Tchaikovsky the news


36 posted on 09/19/2005 4:53:48 AM PDT by dennisw (If you can serve a cup of tea right, you can do anything. - Gurdjieff)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Chairman Fred
I have performed the Mahler Second (here in San Diego, with the chorus) and am about to do so again, in November.

It's good but overrated.


Disagree. The only thing better than Mahler 2 is Mahler 3.
37 posted on 09/19/2005 8:04:51 AM PDT by Cyclopean Squid (Social Darwinism will claim me first.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Panzerlied

I am a devotee of military marches as well. The Germans easily had the best. The Panzerlied is right up there, along with the classic "Russlandlied" and "Panzer Rollen im Afrika vor."


38 posted on 09/19/2005 8:06:42 AM PDT by Cyclopean Squid (Social Darwinism will claim me first.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Sans-Culotte

I absolutely agree that the Resurrection cannot be rated highly enough. It runs the gamut of despair, longing, hope and triumph. Each movement is staggering in its vision. I'm not sure what to call the themes, but personally my favorite moments in the work are the "remembering lost happiness" theme in the 1st movement (that sad rising theme that occurs throughout), the whole Urlicht, and the moment the organ speaks in the glorious finale. I've never been to a live performance, but I hope to someday. I never miss a Mahler concert if I can help it. His music has transformed my life.

I'm also a fan of your screen-name. I read a work on the French Revolution not too long ago, "Citizens." It was superb and remains an area of history in which I am deeply interested.


39 posted on 09/19/2005 8:14:16 AM PDT by Cyclopean Squid (Social Darwinism will claim me first.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Billthedrill

40 posted on 09/19/2005 8:21:11 AM PDT by ArrogantBustard (Western Civilisation is aborting, buggering, and contracepting itself out of existence.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Socratic
LOL. :)

Now, young man, get your mind out of the gutter or I'll wash your mouth out with soap.

41 posted on 09/19/2005 8:32:36 AM PDT by tom h
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Cyclopean Squid

Dear Cyclopean Squid,

"Disagree. The only thing better than Mahler 2 is Mahler 3."

LOL. What a fun thread.

As for me, I don't really care for either Wagner or Mahler. Neither does my older son. But my younger son, while not finding Mahler especially worthwhile, does enjoy Wagner.

It's fun and interesting seeing how each person has his own tastes in the broad range of music to which we loosely apply the term "classical." There is certainly something for everyone.


sitetest


42 posted on 09/19/2005 8:37:36 AM PDT by sitetest (If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Sans-Culotte; Chairman Fred

The problem with any Mahler symphony is that, as an audience member, one tends to listen to them in comfortable seats in a dark, warm hall. It takes intense concentration to listen to one in full: if you let your attention wander for a moment, you'll be asleep and drooling in no time.


43 posted on 09/19/2005 8:44:29 AM PDT by r9etb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: sitetest

That's true. Usually I try to avoid using "classical" music, but I've given up on that. I would normally say Baroque, Classical, Romantic, etc. But that is not accepted practice and so I gave in.

This is a particularly good thread. Once, long ago, I was not into classical music (there I go) with the human voice. I just wasn't ready. So for that reason I was not into Mahler. I took a "Symphony" class which had a great guide written by Edward Downes. This was a collection of program notes on various works. I read through them and become floored when I read the descriptions of Mahler's works, and the stories behind them. I rushed out and listened to the Titan and was transformed. I instantly purchased his complete works on Amazon. It remains my best purchase.

There is so much feeling in Mahler that everything else seems subdued. That can turn some folks off, but being a hopeless neurotic like the G-man I find it perfection itself. There's a Mahler symphony for whichever mood you're in.

I guess I can't understand when folks don't like Mahler. Maybe like my old self they weren't yet ready. Or maybe they just don't like it, plain and simple. I force people to listen and when they respond coldly I am shocked. But I guess when you love something you want everyone else to love it too. I see myself as something of a missionary spreading the music of Mahler. I played it on my college radio station, and wrote about it in our newsletter (it was a prog rock station, but I am friends with the ExecBoard and the newsletter editor).

I'm going to stop rambling now. Honestly.


44 posted on 09/19/2005 8:51:30 AM PDT by Cyclopean Squid (Social Darwinism will claim me first.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Cyclopean Squid

Dear Cyclopean Squid,

I understand what you mean regarding the terms that we use. My own way of using the terms is to recognize that properly speaking, "Classical" relates to a pretty specific sort of music during a pretty specific era, but that the term is also broadly used to refer to a very wide range of music.

I think about the range of music played by our local classical music station - all the way from Renaissance music up through stuff done in the 20th century. Or the main classical radio station on XM Satellite Radio (where, by the way, they don't stint on Mahler), where the slogan is, "The greatest music of the last thousand years." * chuckle *

That seems like a fair enough broad working definition for the term.

Mahler - eh. His music just doesn't ring my bells. I get chills down my spine from Bach and Vivaldi. I can be entranced by Beethoven. I thrill to Gershwin. Even with Wagner, I have some emotional response (although not all positive). But not with Mahler.

Oh well.


sitetest


45 posted on 09/19/2005 9:02:22 AM PDT by sitetest (If Roe is not overturned, no unborn child will ever be protected in law.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: Chairman Fred

Is that the so-called "Symphony of a Thousand"?


46 posted on 09/19/2005 9:05:54 AM PDT by rahbert
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: rahbert

You are thinking of the 8th. That one's got only 2 movements, but one of them is about an hour long! And it's the final scene from Faust II--a great combo, Goethe's words and Mahler's music.


47 posted on 09/19/2005 9:17:22 AM PDT by Cyclopean Squid (Social Darwinism will claim me first.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: Borges
Tristan und Isolde

48 posted on 09/19/2005 9:56:21 AM PDT by wolficatZ (Higgens - "Zeus...Apollo...Patrol!"....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Borges

Wagner's music is better than it sounds.


49 posted on 09/19/2005 9:58:17 AM PDT by durasell
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: sitetest

Listen to the Mahler 5th. It's a great entry piece. And it has the famous Adigietto.


50 posted on 09/19/2005 10:06:12 AM PDT by Borges
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-61 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson