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Retire early - die early
The Local ^ | 10/12/05

Posted on 10/12/2005 4:42:55 PM PDT by BurbankKarl

The idea of a long, relaxed retirement may appeal to many after a life of hard work, but the results of a new Swedish study show that it might not be such a good idea after all.

A joint project from the Karolinska Institute and Linköping University has revealed that people who retire early are twice as likely to die earlier than the rest of the population. The increased risk affects both men and women, noted Dagens Medicin, which got hold of the unpublished results.

For twelve years researchers have studied almost a quarter of a million people in the county of Östergötland who was aged 16 to 64 in 1984.

They found that the risk of dying early was 2.5 times higher among women who retired early and 2.8 times higher among men who retired early.

Women who were forced into an early pension before the age of 24 run the greatest risk: their chances of dying early are 14 times higher than the average.

The news will disturb the 60% of Swedes who in a recent survey said that they are eager to retire early.

Professor Kristina Alexandersson, who led the project, said she was surprised by the result. She told Dagens Medicin that it is normally muscular and skeletal diagnoses, along with depression, which result in early retirement - conditions which do not normally lead to death.

The precise risk of dying early is unclear.

Researchers offer two explanations. One is that the health factors which result in early retirement are many and complex. Another is that the social isolation of early retirement can have a negative influence on health.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: sweden

1 posted on 10/12/2005 4:42:58 PM PDT by BurbankKarl
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To: BurbankKarl

NOW they tell me! ;-}


2 posted on 10/12/2005 4:44:21 PM PDT by Vermonter
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To: BurbankKarl

>>Women who were forced into an early pension before the age of 24<,

Now that's BEFORE early.


3 posted on 10/12/2005 4:46:30 PM PDT by sissyjane (Don't be stuck on stupid!)
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To: BurbankKarl
I think Swedes should work until they are 100, just for the health benefits.

Women who were forced into an early pension before the age of 24 run the greatest risk: their chances of dying early are 14 times higher than the average.

That sounds weird. To be forced into retirement at such an early age would indicate a severe medical problem. Those with severe medical problems are likely to die younger. Ah, the magic of statistics.

That is why the rest should work til 100. To pay for the ones who can't or won't.

4 posted on 10/12/2005 4:49:01 PM PDT by Mind-numbed Robot (Not all that needs to be done needs to be done by the government.)
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To: BurbankKarl
Women who were forced into an early pension before the age of 24 run the greatest risk: their chances of dying

How common is it for anyone to retire before 24? Seems to me if you had to retire before 24, you were probably doing so because of a disability or illness. It seems logical that these people would die earlier.

Perhaps the study didn't adjust for people who left the workforce early due to health reasons? 24 seems very young. Why not look at what happens to people who retire between 40-55?

5 posted on 10/12/2005 4:50:04 PM PDT by radiohead (Proud member of the 'arrogant supermagt')
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To: BurbankKarl
Retirement is overrated. At least, that's what I hear from everybody I know that's retired. Most of them have gone back to at least some type of job.
6 posted on 10/12/2005 4:51:48 PM PDT by SamAdams76 (What Would Howard Roarke Do?)
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To: radiohead

Since the upper age quoted for the study two lines above is "64", I presume the "24" is a typo.


7 posted on 10/12/2005 4:53:10 PM PDT by Mr. Jeeves (Speaking several languages is an asset; keeping your mouth shut in one is priceless.)
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To: BurbankKarl
Don't be telling me this! I retired at 55. That was three years ago.

I actually am FAR MORE busy than I was working. You know...FReepin' and that kind of stuff. LOL

8 posted on 10/12/2005 4:55:23 PM PDT by afnamvet
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To: Mr. Jeeves
Since the upper age quoted for the study two lines above is "64", I presume the "24" is a typo.

Ah ha. See what happens when you read closely? : )

9 posted on 10/12/2005 4:57:13 PM PDT by radiohead (Proud member of the 'arrogant supermagt')
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To: BurbankKarl
"Another is that the social isolation of early retirement can have a negative influence on health."

Hey this site keeps me going in spite of a lot of 'negative influences'.

10 posted on 10/12/2005 4:59:24 PM PDT by ex-snook (Vote gridlock for the most conservative government)
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To: BurbankKarl

So is this good news for the Delphi workers forced into early retirement and now worrying about losing their pensions? The bankruptcy court can rule against the UAW since all the retirees are going to die early.


11 posted on 10/12/2005 5:02:52 PM PDT by Elmer Gantry
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To: BurbankKarl

Umm... Could it be that sick people retire early... Because they are sick?


12 posted on 10/12/2005 5:06:38 PM PDT by Poser (Willing to fight for oil)
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To: BurbankKarl

i actually believe that retiring is hazzardous to your health.
people lose purpose when they do not have a routine to persue.
it is important to have that intermingling with co workers,
birthday partys child birth etc.
it does not have to be full time but any commitment to work gives you an outlet from the ho hum. it is rare that someone can float through retirement and be blissful.
check out woody hayse. retires and dies.


13 posted on 10/12/2005 5:08:51 PM PDT by 537cant be wrong (vampires stole my lunch money !)
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To: BurbankKarl
my father just turned 82 and is still self-employed... he does landscape design... he loves it... at his 70th birthday/retirement party he announced to all in attendance that he was absolutely not retiring...

a couple of years ago, he began cutting way back on work, maybe keeping 1/2 his accounts... that did not last long... slowly but surely, he began to take on more... his work has been very good for him and my mom... he takes time off when he wants to, and just about always has... he and my mom have traveled extensively during the last 20 years... besides, the whole notion of retirement is not biblical...

14 posted on 10/12/2005 5:14:16 PM PDT by latina4dubya
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To: BurbankKarl

Retirement is a hoax. Everyone needs a reason to get up in the morning.


15 posted on 10/12/2005 5:15:52 PM PDT by durasell
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To: Mind-numbed Robot
"That sounds weird. To be forced into retirement at such an early age would indicate a severe medical problem. Those with severe medical problems are likely to die younger. Ah, the magic of statistics."

That was exactly my first thought.

In my case, I retired at 50 (11 years ago) and am in very good health.

16 posted on 10/12/2005 5:32:51 PM PDT by blam
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To: durasell
Retirement (inactivity, no purpose) kills. I noticed that when some IBMers, real company men, who had no life besides company life retired, it didn't take much longer than 2 - 5 years before obituary notice announced their short retirement.
Maybe Swedish Socialist government dies retirees early, so they don't have to pay pensions? Sure easy to administer with free medical care. Doctor mistakes kill more people than war.
17 posted on 10/12/2005 5:34:13 PM PDT by Leo Carpathian (FReeeePeee!)
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To: BurbankKarl

What a crock this article is. I retired early nearly 15 years ago at 45 and I’m now 60. When we retired my wife and I and our baby daughter moved to a rural state and bought an acreage. What a wonderful and life we have lived since! We would in no way give up the experience of getting out of the cities to move out to the country with our family. Our days are filled with golfing, boating, hanging out together at our home, computers, gardening, ham radio, motorcycles, walking, running, birds, hobbies, and enjoying being together. Back before retirement, I'd come home ticked off, stressed out, taking antacids, etc. and didn't hardly talk to my wife for the first hour I was home.

And, some think retiring early is bad for you? Don’t think so -- no way. This article is BS.


18 posted on 10/12/2005 5:35:38 PM PDT by Rightone
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To: SamAdams76
"Retirement is overrated"

No it's not. I retired at 57, now 66 and happier than heck. Good health and a son that just turned 20 today.

Simple fact, life is better for some than others. I have no clue why.

Personally, I think the answer is Boxers vs Jockey's.

19 posted on 10/12/2005 5:40:33 PM PDT by AGreatPer
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To: Vermonter

Mom and Dad are a very healthy 85.

They must be the exception--and I'm blessed!!!!


20 posted on 10/12/2005 5:41:52 PM PDT by bannie (The government which robs Peter to pay Paul can always depend upon the support of Paul.)
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To: Vermonter

I'm getting prepared for a second career. My son is in college, my daughter is in the eleventh grade. I don't plan on retiring, but I may go part time at some point.


21 posted on 10/12/2005 5:42:04 PM PDT by television is just wrong (http://hehttp://print.google.com/print/doc?articleidisblogs.blogspot.com/ (visit blogs, visit ads).)
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To: BurbankKarl

Ummmm... of course in the very socialist state of Sweden where this bogus article was prepared, the WORST thing they could possibly have happen is to have people retiring early. The STATE needs everyone working as long as possible to support all the state's programs.


22 posted on 10/12/2005 5:51:48 PM PDT by Rightone
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To: BurbankKarl

Had a neighbor retire just 6 months ago. He was in law enforcement for 35 years. He just dropped dead two months ago, exactly 4 months to the day after retiring. I recall him telling me he was bored as hell.


23 posted on 10/12/2005 5:54:34 PM PDT by Black Tooth (The more people I meet, the more I like my dog.)
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To: BurbankKarl

I've noticed this for a long time although I look at it differently. Those who work have the impetus to get up every morning and keep themselves in relative good health because they need to keep working. Once the need to work everyday disappears, many people ask their bodies to do less and wind up killing themselves in the process through weight gain, heart disease, etc.

I think of Paul "Bear" Bryant who coached football to a ripe old age and then died of a heart attack a year into retirement. I think some people just aren't meant to stop working.

BTW, I also see a correlation between occupations and length of life. It seems that if you swing your arms regularly and have few bosses, you will live longer. The celebrities I note who seem to have the longest average lifespans are professional golfers, orchestra conductors and movie directors. That's what I see that all three have in common.


24 posted on 10/12/2005 5:59:52 PM PDT by Tall_Texan ("I regret that I have but one spine to give to my party.")
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To: Rightone

Nearly everyone (retirees that is) that I know agree. They're all having more fun (and seem busier) than when they were working.


25 posted on 10/12/2005 6:05:28 PM PDT by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch ist der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: Poser
Umm... Could it be that sick people retire early... Because they are sick?Likely, even if they are unaware of problems, they may just not feel as good as before. (I never felt as good as before.)
26 posted on 10/12/2005 6:06:58 PM PDT by Doctor Stochastic (Vegetabilisch = chaotisch ist der Charakter der Modernen. - Friedrich Schlegel)
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To: BurbankKarl

Six days shalt thou labor and do all thy work.


27 posted on 10/12/2005 6:15:43 PM PDT by aardvark1 (Eschew obfuscation.)
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To: BurbankKarl; Leo Carpathian; Rightone

It is an interesting study, but it has the opposite data than a report I saw.

Last year, I saw a paper circuilating around at work that showed the average number of monthly retirement checks that Boeing retirees drew, based on the age of retirement.

For those retiring at age 55 .... 300 monthly payments (25 years of retirement)
For those retiring at age 65 .... 18 monthly payments.

Now, like so many others in this thread, I suspect that there are far more things that go into this.

BUT ... I suspect that those who have active retired life - and those retiring at earlier ages might have developed major hobbies that keep the retirees busy!!

As for me ... I wish I had retired at 40, because based on the Boeing curve, I would live forever!

Now ... maybe the Swedish study was looking at people who were totally bored in retired life, and died off after retirement, regardless of age of retirement ... but I am skeptical. I think both Leo Carpathian & Rightone are both correct in their suppositions!

Mike


28 posted on 10/12/2005 6:15:46 PM PDT by Vineyard
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To: Leo Carpathian

Ever go to a retirement community? The most boring bunch of people you ever want to meet. Their entire focus has been narrowed to the trivial or the crack pot. They're in storage. I talk to everyone, and believe me, the old guy who is still working as a janitor or driving a cab is more interesting than the former CEO living in retirement.


29 posted on 10/12/2005 6:16:24 PM PDT by durasell
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To: radiohead
Why not look at what happens to people who retire between 40-55?

OK, keep your eye on me. I retired when I was 46 and now I'm 59. If I quit posting you can assume it's because I'm dead. =:0

30 posted on 10/12/2005 6:26:07 PM PDT by DumpsterDiver
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To: DumpsterDiver
If I quit posting you can assume it's because I'm dead.

LOL

Too bad you're not a Dim, you could post after you're dead.

31 posted on 10/12/2005 6:33:50 PM PDT by radiohead (Proud member of the 'arrogant supermagt')
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To: BurbankKarl
Sweden?

They died of boredom.

32 posted on 10/12/2005 6:35:19 PM PDT by Hank Rearden (Never allow anyone who could only get a government job attempt to tell you how to run your life.)
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To: BurbankKarl

How many people who "retire" early do so because of failing health and skew the mortality avergaes?


33 posted on 10/12/2005 6:37:40 PM PDT by muir_redwoods (Free Sirhan Sirhan, after all, the bastard who killed Mary Jo Kopechne is walking around free)
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To: SamAdams76
You haven't talked to me or the guys I know who have retired. Not one of them wants to go back to work, EVER, especially if they have to work for someone else. If I die sooner, so what, we all die, it is just a matter of when.

IMO, these types of studies are done in order to discourage people from retiring early in welfare states in order to cut down on the amount of money paid out to the retirees. Back in the 70s, I think it was, there was a study done on similar lines in the US and they were urging people not to draw there SS before they reached full retirement as they might die sooner.

34 posted on 10/12/2005 8:29:22 PM PDT by calex59
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