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Hurricane Preparedness ( and general "bad times" links )
various FR links & stories | 10-23-05 | the heavy equipment guy

Posted on 10/23/2005 2:50:03 PM PDT by backhoe

 
The following is my usual slap-dash collection of quotes and links from other posts I have run across, with information about preparing for, coping with, and generally surviving hurricanes.

Tossed in is some general disaster information. Credit given when I can find or remember it.

The Survivalist & Y2K hounds weren't so wrong, after all...


  Fast Facts: How to Prepare  

  Survival starts at the household level -Here is one Survivalist site which I've found fascinatingly useful...(Simple Survival)

 Emergency Preparedness (year's supply of food, 72 hour kit)
( Our own UtahGirl- hattip! )

 
To: All
To: RoseyT; All

I hope everyone reading your post is paying attention. Losing electricity means no water, no refrigerated food, canned food disappearing from stores twice as fast as a result, no gasoline, because pumps can't bring it up out of the ground, and because there's no gasoline, no deliveries of food or medicine or other necessary supplies.

From what I've seen in the aftermath of these two hurricanes. most Americans simply are not set up to survive without electricity, and this worries me, because our electrical grid is wide open to a terrorist attack.

If we can't defend a 1000 mile border with Mexico, how can we possibly defend ten thousand miles of transmission lines? Any group of idiots with a crate of hand grenades can do to the country at large exactly what we see happening in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi.

I've spent a lot of time thinking about this, and it seems to me that survival in the absence of electricity falls into four main categories.

1. Water. You can survive for 3 minutes without oxygen, three days without water, and three weeks without food. You need a dead minimum of 1 gallon of water, per person, per day. This will only meet survival needs if no water is used for flushing toilets or for bathing. The average person may not drink a full gallon everyday, but by the time you factor in cooking and cleaning needs, one gallon per person is cutting the supply very thin.

Water storage takes up a lot of space, and it can be a fragile resource. Most containers of store bought water will break down over time and leak, they are designed to, so that they will biodegrade. Two liter soda bottles seem to hold up for much longer. So do water jugs purchased for camping. A family of four will need a minimum of 40 gallons to survive ten days. That is eight 5 gallon camping jugs or 80 two liter pop bottles full.

Far better is a sustainable supply. With the proper preparation, a creek or lake will keep you and your family alive for a long time. You need to be able to filter out particulate matter and you need to be able to kill germs and bacteria to use this water, especially since the chances are that others will be using these sources for waste disposal in the event of an emergency.

Water filters for backpackers can be purchased for around $50 to $100, but without filter replacements, they are limited to 100 to 200 gallons before they clog up.

A large scale filter can be constructed from a pair of large tupperware containers or buckets, some playground sand, and some fist sized rocks or driveway gravel. Cut half inch holes in the bottom of the smaller container and fill it two inches with gravel. Fill it another four inches with playground sand. Place about two inches of gravel in the bottom of the larger container, and then place the smaller container inside the larger one. Unfiltered water goes into the inner container, and filtered water is drawn off from the outer container. Be careful not to contaminate the outer container when pouring unfiltered water into the inner one.

This will remove mud, sand and grit, but it will not purify the water. Purification can be accomplished with ordinary Clorox bleach, 5.5 percent sodium hypochlorite solution, no perfumes or softeners. Use 8 drops of bleach per gallon of clean water, or up to 16 drops of bleach per gallon for water from suspect sources. The colder the water, the longer it will take the bleach to kill the bugs. Let the bleach do it's thing at least half an hour, I prefer to let it stand overight before using it. This will allow you nearly unlimited reserves of water without consuming fuel for boiling.

2. Food. Canned or boxed food, anything that does not require refrigeration, will disappear from stores overnight or sooner in the event of an emergency. You cannot wait until disaster strikes to stock up. You need breakfast, lunch and dinner for each person to function in the long term without electricity or outside aid. Foods requiring only boiled water require less water for cooking and cleanup.

Oatmeal or cream of wheat will suffice for breakfast. Canned fruit can improve the taste and nutrition value. Sugar may be required for flavor. Powdered fruit juice mixes can be served cold. A mix of powdered fruit juices and powdered gatorade will serve multiple purposes in warmer climates. Tea or coffee will improve the morale of adults.

Peanut butter, jam and crackers can serve as a basis for lunch. Powdered soups may supplement. Discount stores sell ramen noodle soups with vegetables by the case for less than 2 dollars. Beef jerky, peanuts, and M&M's can provide a change of pace. Canned tomatoes and elbow macaroni make a tasty hot dish. A little bit of onion or garlic seasoning go a long way to providing variety and improving flavor.

Dinner options are limited. Canned chicken or fish is most readily available. Bulk can be achieved with canned vegatables, canned fruits, and rice/macaroni. Foil pouches of hamburger do not require refrigeration and taste ok for tacos or spaghetti sauce. Spam and armor treet do not require refrigeration. Canned beef stew, beef hash, and spoaghetti/lasagne products can be purchased by the case from discount houses. Canned ham is readily available. One can of vegetable and another of fruit will keep from lunchtime to dinnertime, allowing for less waste and more balanced servings.

Liquor can serve as trading stock, and in some cases, fuel. A surplus of spices can serve as trading stock.

Don't forget the can opener, manual type, and a backup, plus a couple of P-38 style emergency backups.

3. Sanitation and human waste disposal. If water is readily available and sanitary sewers are functional, unfiltered water can be used to flush toilets. Dedicated containers make this process easier. Be sure to differentiate between containers used for filtered and unfiltered water and do not mix them up, or flushing requirements will skyrocket.

If sanitary sewers are not functional or water for flushing is in short supply, solid human waste should be deposited in 5 gallon buckets and burned in 30 or 55 gallon steel containers. Some fuel (kerosine works well) will be necessary to get the fire started. Burning containers need ventilation holes punched around the bottom rim for good combustion. Note wind direction before burning waste. A standard toilet seat will fit onto a 5 gallon bucket for better balance. Provisions for privacy will do a lot for morale. Don't forget to stockpile toilet paper.

A solar shower can be purchased for less than $10 at discount houses. In an emergency one can be constructed from a black garbage bag, but it will not function as well or as fast as one designed for the purpose, nor will it serve as a sprinkler head. In cold or cool climates, the ground or the hood of a vehicle will act as a heat sink and speed heat loss and prolong warm-up times. Insulation under the shower bag will counter this effect. On cloudy days, or whenever warming does not happen fast enough, take what you can get from the sun and enhance it with water warmed on the stove. This water does not have to be filtered, but it should not be swallowed or used to brush teeth if it hasn't been purified.

One adult can shower with as little as 1 gallon of water, although 1.5 gallons is a more realistic estimate.

Don't forget soap and shampoo. Clothes can be washed in a tub, sink or other container, using the friction method. Don't forget a suitable detergent. Dishwasher soap and automatic laundry detergents are poor substitutes for the manual variants. Clorox will act as a good disinfectant.

4. First aid. The major injuries you can expect after a disaster are cuts and broken bones. You need a way to stop bleeding, to clean and disinfect wounds, and to dress them so as to avoid infection later on. You can never have too many four by fours, 4" square gauze pads. You can never have too much duct tape. A well made dressing does not require surgical tape, since the tape does not touch open or abraded skin.

Duct tape and splints will stabilize broken bones. Be sure to pad splints if they will be used for an extended period, or ulceration will occur.

In an absolute emergency salt water will kill germs, and a ziplock bag with a pinhole will serve as an irrigation aid. Better yet is to stock up in advance on commercial disinfectant ointments. Rubbing alcohol and/or hydrogen peroxide are inexpensive in quantity but suffer some of the same drawbacks as salt water. Rubber tourniquets are worth their weight in gold, for a lot more than medical emergencies.

In addition to being ready for cuts and broken bones, a well tuned first aid kit will contain apsirin, antacid tablets, and antihistamines. Cough drops are a plus. Heavier pain medications may be useful if you have a prescription. Surgical masks, disposable rubber gloves and scissors are very useful to have.

If you purchase a surgical suite, or include needle and thread in your kit, be sure to include a weighty medical reference text along with it. Emergency appendectomies look good on TV. Your mileage may vary.

These are the four basic considerations in a situation where electrical service is interrupted for an indeterminate time, water, food, sanitation, and medical emergencies.

Heat or cold temperatures will require forethought and some sacrifice. Layers provide better insulation that one thick coat. Artificial fabrics next to the skin will wick away perspiration and greatly improve your survival chances in cold weather. Cotton holds moisture and kills people in cold environments through hypothermia.

In hot environments you need steady water intake to survive 4 hours of sweating. If you feel thirsty, you have waited too long. After four hours of heavy perspiration, you will need to address electrolyte balance. Powdered gatorade will deal with this, as will other sources of potassium such as bananas. Ordinary salt might not hurt, but it won't help as much as gatorade. One quart of gatorade will allow an adult male to perspire heavily for 8 hours without significant effect. Dinner and breakfast can be used to replete electrolytes after the workday is finished, preserving and extending gatorade stockpiles. An ordinary headband, handkerchief, or ballcap will keep sweat out of your eyes while working, and will go a long way towards improving your effort and its beneficial effect.

Emergency lighting is necessary, but not always advisable. LED headlamps provide hands-free emergency light for working, and preserve battery life up to 100 hours. Flashlights require a hand to hold them and use batteries much faster. Whale oil lamps can soot damage a dwelling very quickly if not properly adjusted, but will last longer than candles and will provide more light. Most oil lamps are cheaply constructed, get familiar with their inner workings before you need to depend on them. A small needlenose pilers and small screwdriver are essential for servicing these lamps. Oil for lamps can spontaneausly combust, discard wicks and rags outside, away from flammable materials after use. Any combustion consumes oxygen. Proper ventilation is a must.

Displaying light after sunset will call attention to your dwelling and may invite unwanted attention. Changing to a sunrise to sunset schedule will preserve resources and enhance security.

Security is a matter of personal choice, especially involving firearms. The uninitiated will be best served with a 12 gauge shotgun, which requires minimal practice to serve as an effective deterrent. During an emergency is a bad time to learn muzzle and trigger discipline, not to mention markmanship. An assortment of #5 or #7 birdshot, double ought buckshot, and deer slugs will allow you to double the utility for both defense and for small game hunting. Weapons should always be kept immaculately clean and should always be considered to be loaded.

That's enough for now, it covers the basics and doesn't add more detail than is necessary. In my opinion, it is only a matter of time before large segments of the American population are subjected to moderate or prolonged periods without electricity. We will either be ready for it, or we will not. The choice to prepare ourselves rests with each of us as individuals.



2,192 posted on 09/30/2005 2:55:57 PM EDT by jeffers
 
  Survival Preparedness
 
 Hurricane evacuation lessons
 
  Here's what you need:

Water
a fill bath tub
b fill all large pots
c several dozen cleaned plastic milk carton / change quarterly

Battery operated radio
Battery operated flashlights (1 per person + 1)

Week worth of batteries for above

Fill propane for gas grill

Fill all cars

Sterno cans and fondue pot for cooking

Matches, lighter, lighter fluid

Several rolls of 6 mil plastic sheets 10’ x 100’

5 boxes of 20 each, large garbage sacks

4 pair heavy work gloves

Axe, hatchet, shovel nails, heavy duty staples, staple gun, hammers, saws, chain saw

6 bread baking pans (to make block ice)

4 large ice chests

Hand operated can opener and bottle opener

Bug spray

1 month of all medicine, gauze, band aids, tape, alcohol, OTC headache, antiseptic

Heavy duty knives, 100 each plastic forks, spoons, knives, paper towels, paper plates Toilet Paper!

Soup, Vienna sausage, peanut butter, crackers, chili, bread, several small jelly, mustard, spam, apples, dried fruit, hard candy,

Stove top coffee pot, 10 lbs coffee, sugar, salt, pepper, tea bags

2 12 ga shot guns – 2 boxes of 00; 1 of slugs; bird shot

Can't recall the SN of the FReeper who penned the above- apologies!

 Start your food storage on $10 a week
 
 What is the best weapon for my wife?
 
  Gun sales up since hurricanes (CA) -- This is quite a phenomenon since all the footege of the looters in NO ran endlessly on the MSM.
My niece and nephew in Florida, boomer peaceniks, went out and bought their first guns last month, and have been down at the firing range learning how to use them. They are well-off, and have a lot of property to protect. Never thought I'd see the day that they would arm themselves.
 
 
Emergency Kit Is First Step
 
 FEMA family disaster supplies kit
 
 Food Storage and Emergency Preparation
 

-Terror Tips--

 
 When disaster strikes, be ready
 
 What you need
 
 


TOPICS: Extended News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 41; alasbabylon; difficulttimes; emergencyprep; hurricanes; prep; preparedness; prepper; preppers; prepping; preps; survival; teotwawki
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As usual also, you have to follow "the links within the links" to see all the information. Rest assured, if you do so, you will find much to do, and much to ponder.
1 posted on 10/23/2005 2:50:04 PM PDT by backhoe
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To: backhoe
"Any group of idiots with a crate of hand grenades can do to the country at large exactly what we see happening in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. "

But not for long. Witness the recent attacks on Baghdad's electrical grid.
2 posted on 10/23/2005 2:56:13 PM PDT by Pessimist
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To: backhoe

Bookmarked! Thanks Backhoe! Excellent work! I live way outta town in the Iowa countryside, so we're used to going for days without the amenities, never hurts to be MORE prepared though :)


3 posted on 10/23/2005 2:57:41 PM PDT by America's Resolve (I've just become a 'single issue voter' for 06 and 08. My issue is illegal immigration!)
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To: America's Resolve; Pessimist
Thank you both for looking.

I'll be around, but have to retrieve the Lovely Miss Emily from the boondocks at some time soon.

4 posted on 10/23/2005 3:02:47 PM PDT by backhoe (-30-)
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To: backhoe

Thank You so much for providing this info.


5 posted on 10/23/2005 3:06:05 PM PDT by mother22wife21 (...Like a rhinestone cowboy....)
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To: mother22wife21

Thanks for looking- it's appreciated.


6 posted on 10/23/2005 3:09:10 PM PDT by backhoe (-30-)
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To: BartMan1; Nailbiter; Forecaster

... boy scout ping...


7 posted on 10/23/2005 3:10:51 PM PDT by IncPen (Because it's not your money, Senator Kennedy. It's mine, and I'd like to keep it)
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To: IncPen

Thanks for those pings, neighbor... and regarding your tagline, take a look at mine:


8 posted on 10/23/2005 3:26:07 PM PDT by backhoe ("It's so easy to spend someone else's money." [My Dad, circa 1958])
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To: backhoe

I bookmarked this. I wonder what happens to inner city apartment dwellers who don't have the room to store all this stuff?

This might be mentioned on the links, but diaper wipes are indespensible. I used to fill up 2 liter soda bottles with water for camping trips many years ago, for a block ice substitute. Just pop them in the freezer for a couple of days before the trip.

Don't forget pet food. Storing an adequate amount of water has always seemed like a problem. It takes up so much space, and trying to remember to rotate the stock can be a pain.

Thank you for posting this! I don't think we have to worry about a hurricane, but we've had earthquakes frequently in the last few months, and in June or July, I think we had a small twister roll through. East facing, west facing doors, and all the windows trying to bust loose....? Lasted less than a minute. We need to get off our rears and get prepared, after we move.


9 posted on 10/23/2005 3:28:08 PM PDT by TheSpottedOwl ("President Bush, start building that wall"!)
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To: backhoe

Bookmarked and ping


10 posted on 10/23/2005 3:33:12 PM PDT by Vinnie
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To: backhoe
Here's a great water filter:

Here's the website:

www.aquarain.com

I bought one of these after September 11 when we were all concerned about the safety of our water supply.

11 posted on 10/23/2005 3:47:44 PM PDT by FReepaholic (My other tagline is hilarious.)
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To: TheSpottedOwl
Hi, Owl!

Thanks for those tips, they're good ones.

Remembering food for any animals is easy to overlook- I've done it myself in the past.

One little-remembered source of clean water is your water heater- the water is flat ( shake it in a bottle to re-aerate it ), and may have minerals in the bottom of the tank when you first start draining it
( the hose barb at the base, behind the access panel- be sure to kill the power, just in case, and do not restore it until you get the tank refilled, later )
but it's potable.

Another overlooked source of water is every toilet tank ( not the bowl, mind you! ) which has about 5 gallons in it. If you're paranoid or fastidious, water purification tablets can be used to treat it, but it's perfectly sanitary, despite how it sounds!

12 posted on 10/23/2005 3:52:50 PM PDT by backhoe
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To: TheSpottedOwl
...I wonder what happens to inner city apartment dwellers who don't have the room to store all this stuff? ...

You'd be surprised how much room you can come up with if you try.

Store water containers under beds, can goods in closets, etc.

Another good way to store water is in a waterbed. There is a problem with some waterbed chemicals, however.

13 posted on 10/23/2005 3:53:25 PM PDT by FReepaholic (My other tagline is hilarious.)
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To: backhoe

I only have 1 20 gauge shotgun am I doomed?


14 posted on 10/23/2005 3:54:51 PM PDT by TheRedSoxWinThePennant
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To: tscislaw

http://www.aquarain.com

I bought one of these after September 11 when we were all concerned about the safety of our water supply.



Thanks- I'm sure many will find that helpful.


15 posted on 10/23/2005 3:56:32 PM PDT by backhoe
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To: Vinnie

Thanks for looking.


16 posted on 10/23/2005 3:56:54 PM PDT by backhoe
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To: TheRedSoxWinThePennant
I only have 1 20 gauge shotgun am I doomed?

Not at all- I routinely recommend a 20, or less often, a 16 gauge if that's what you are comfortable with.

The list you are probably referring to was copied from an unknown FReeper- I do recommend each person have a shotgun, a sidearm, and if possible, a rifle. Preferrably of common calibres/gauges. In other words, if you have a 20 gauge, it is less of a logistical problem if everyone else in your "unit" uses it, too.

17 posted on 10/23/2005 4:04:26 PM PDT by backhoe
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To: backhoe

I feel quite comfortable with my 20 and a 40 by my side. No rifles though.


18 posted on 10/23/2005 4:07:23 PM PDT by TheRedSoxWinThePennant
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To: TheRedSoxWinThePennant
I feel quite comfortable with my 20 and a 40 by my side. No rifles though.

It's not really needed that much in a home setting- slugs will give your shotgun a reach of about a hundred yards, and that should be enough.

19 posted on 10/23/2005 4:14:47 PM PDT by backhoe
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To: TheRedSoxWinThePennant

No, you are ok, but I'd lay in extra shells. I have 10 boxes of 12 ga shells here and three more in the back of my Bronco.

Don't you have a handgun? You should.

I have a Glock 17 with six 17 round mags, plus a Kimber Gold Match 45 auto with several Wilson Combat 7 round magazines.


20 posted on 10/23/2005 4:14:55 PM PDT by Armedanddangerous (Liberals are so stupid, they couldn't spell cat if you spotted them the C and the A.)
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To: Armedanddangerous

I have a kimber 40


21 posted on 10/23/2005 4:19:36 PM PDT by TheRedSoxWinThePennant
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To: backhoe

Hey Backhoe!

Those cats won't be denied, lol! I know about the water heater and toilet tank as sources of emercency water sources. My biggest worry is if the vehicles are disabled, and there is a forced evacuation. How do you pack it all out? If I was settled permanently, mind you we're in the desert, so no 8 ft of polluted water to worry about(plus we have the wrench to immediately shut off the gas), why should we evacuate if we have ample supplies? Heck, the Mojave river is just down the road, and so is the CA aqueduct.


22 posted on 10/23/2005 4:26:58 PM PDT by TheSpottedOwl ("President Bush, start building that wall"!)
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To: tscislaw

Some landlords specifically prohibit waterbeds, for good reason. There is a lot of room under regular beds though, but my kids used them to hide dirty dishes and socks ;-)

I like the 72 hr trash can idea. Plus we have basic camping equipment. More can be picked up at yard sales. I've done a lot of camping in the past, so I know what works, and I'm interested in what's new.


23 posted on 10/23/2005 4:31:26 PM PDT by TheSpottedOwl ("President Bush, start building that wall"!)
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To: TheSpottedOwl
My biggest worry is if the vehicles are disabled, and there is a forced evacuation. How do you pack it all out?

That's a good question- I guess if I had a choice, I'd get and keep an old Army Duece & a half 5 ton truck as a bugout vehicle. My brother-in-law actually has a neighbor who keeps one in his carport. The downside being license, insurance, keeping it in running condition-- they aren't something you take for a spin to the grocery, normally.

When we had the wrecker and welding services, the wrecker and service truck were handy to have, as they could carry a fair amount of cargo. Alas, the service truck got sold, and the wrecker needs a new master cylinder- to say nothing of a current license plate and insurance- to make it roadworthy & legal. I still use it as a boom truck around my MIL's old store, but stopping 8,000+ pounds of truck with the hand brake is a little hair-raising...

24 posted on 10/23/2005 4:38:40 PM PDT by backhoe
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To: backhoe
("It's so easy to spend someone else's money." [My Dad, circa 1958])

One of my favorites from my Dad, and a sometime tagline of mine is:

The liberal's reward is self-disgust [circa 1979]

Thanks for the links and info; my gut tells me we're gonna need them, sooner rather than later...

25 posted on 10/23/2005 4:52:40 PM PDT by IncPen (Because it's not your money, Senator Kennedy. It's mine, and I'd like to keep it)
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To: backhoe
Don't overlook Heater Meals http://www.heatermeals.com/ for storage for emergencies. I'm still using my Y2K stock, and they're in good shape.

They come in a cardboard box, with a plastic tub and a bag of saltwater inside, in addition to the sealed meal. You take everything out, pour the saltwater onto the chemical element in the bottom of the tub, put the meal back in the tub, and slide everything back into the box for 15 minutes. Watch the steam come out. Self-heating, wide variety of meals, easy storage.

I've used them for years for camping, for meals at outdoor concerts, and for emergencies (like when my wife visits her family in CA).

26 posted on 10/23/2005 4:53:41 PM PDT by JoeFromSidney (My book is out. Read excerpts at www.thejusticecooperative.com)
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To: TheRedSoxWinThePennant

That is always a great option if you are into the 40 short and weak caliber. Personally, I'd like to have a full size Kimber in 9mm. Ten shots with excellent accuracy, and not much recoil to speak of.


27 posted on 10/23/2005 4:58:01 PM PDT by Armedanddangerous (Liberals are so stupid, they couldn't spell cat if you spotted them the C and the A.)
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To: backhoe

Excellent compendium, backhoe. You always come up with the best info around. Bookmarked to Favorites.


28 posted on 10/23/2005 5:00:33 PM PDT by shezza (Boy Scout motto: "Be Prepared.")
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To: Armedanddangerous

You know I don't shoot as much as I used to. To be honest if I need a gun for home defense I think I would prefer my 20g. I am more comfortable with it. Plus the intimidation factor of a shotgun blast I think helps ward off any accomplices


29 posted on 10/23/2005 5:01:33 PM PDT by TheRedSoxWinThePennant
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To: IncPen

Thanks- your Dad and mine probably would have gotten alone well. He was a Goldwater man, as was I, eons ago.


30 posted on 10/23/2005 5:01:57 PM PDT by backhoe
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To: JoeFromSidney

"Don't overlook Heater Meals

http://www.heatermeals.com/

for storage for emergencies. I'm still using my Y2K stock, and they're in good shape...I've used them for years..."




Great tip, thanks! Made clickable.


31 posted on 10/23/2005 5:05:14 PM PDT by backhoe
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To: shezza

Appreciate the kind words- thanks for looking.


32 posted on 10/23/2005 5:05:49 PM PDT by backhoe
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To: backhoe
Thanks- your Dad and mine probably would have gotten alone well. He was a Goldwater man, as was I, eons ago.

My guess is that Dad was a Goldwater man- I can't be sure, I was just a pup.

But I know that to him Reagan was like water to a man dying of thirst.

I remember picking him up from some appointment right when the Iran-Contra story was breaking.

He got in the car and I turned down the radio news and said, 'Guess what- they're saying they used the Iran money to fund the Contras..."

He burst out laughing and said, 'Oh, those poor liberals."

He thought it was the funniest damn thing... and laughed the whole way home.

He's gone 6 years last week- I still miss talking to him

33 posted on 10/23/2005 5:09:37 PM PDT by IncPen (Because it's not your money, Senator Kennedy. It's mine, and I'd like to keep it)
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To: IncPen
He's gone 6 years last week- I still miss talking to him...

Mine's been gone 20 years, and I still have the childish feeling that if I just drove up the drive to the house ( long gone, too, ) and walked up the walk, he'd be standing there with that "go to Hell" smile of his, a square, squat, ham-handed Dutchman to the core.

34 posted on 10/23/2005 5:16:36 PM PDT by backhoe (Just an old Keyboard Cowboy, ridin' the trakball into the Dawn of Information...)
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To: TheRedSoxWinThePennant

Get out there and practice with your handgun. The 1911 has the easiest manual of arms of any pistol out there. If you shoot 50 rounds a month, you will at least be keeping up your knowledge of the handgun.

I try and shoot my Glock at least that much, and as I live in the country, I can shoot off the back porch.

Another point is, you can get practice ammo relatively cheap from places like Wal Mart and Dicks Sporting Goods. Almost every Sunday Dicks has some sort of a sale on handgun ammunition. You don't have to have hollow point ammo to punch holes in paper targets. Full metal jacket ammo is just fine for that purpose.

Optimally, I might consider the purchase of 500 rounds from some place online like Georgia Ammo, or www.aimspurplus.com

If some SHTF situation happened, I would think 500 rounds of 40 cal ammo in the closet would be a calming thing. Especially if there are reports of looting, like in New Orleans.

Shooting a handgun is fun. You should do it as much as possible.


35 posted on 10/23/2005 5:39:18 PM PDT by Armedanddangerous (Liberals are so stupid, they couldn't spell cat if you spotted them the C and the A.)
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To: Armedanddangerous

I agree shooting a handgun is fun and my wife and I go to an indoor range in Tampa maybe 4 times a year. You are right though I should shoot it more. I cant shoot it off my back porch though. Although about 2 months ago I loaded my shotgun with the intention of shooting a pitbull that attacked 3 people in my neighborhood and had my wife cornered in the back of a pickup truck. Fortunately for the dog a hillsborough county deputy showed up and proceeded to do absolutely nothing.


36 posted on 10/23/2005 5:44:14 PM PDT by TheRedSoxWinThePennant
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To: backhoe

Aaaah, there lies the problem, if you don't have neighbors you can collaborate with. We don't even know where we're moving, but I have a list I'm calling later on tonight for rentals.

My bf has a 60's Suburban that is almost fixed, but his friend is working 12+ hrs a day and cannot complete. They were going to put in an automatic transmission so I could drive it, but lets just get it running. Keeping all vehicles in gas makes sense, and also keeping jerry cans filled is a good idea.

Such a pain to take care of yourselves and loved ones : (


37 posted on 10/23/2005 5:50:19 PM PDT by TheSpottedOwl ("President Bush, start building that wall"!)
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To: TheSpottedOwl
Such a pain to take care of yourselves and loved ones : (

Indeed it is- I'm the "Mother Hen" ( that's "Mutha!" to be a little rude about it... ) for my extended family.

Mechanic, medic, gopher--
( "Hey, it's raining/snowing/Hurricane Weather outside, and we need medicine/gas/repairs-- let's call John! He knows how to do it!" )
Grumble, grumble! If I could just get paid to it, I'd be rich...

38 posted on 10/24/2005 1:09:09 AM PDT by backhoe (Just an old Keyboard Cowboy, ridin' the trakball into the Dawn of Information...)
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To: backhoe

Oh yes, mother hen. Every time my grown kids need something, I hear from them. Finally told them to fix it themselves, because it ends up costing me money!


39 posted on 10/24/2005 5:36:40 AM PDT by TheSpottedOwl ("President Bush, start building that wall"!)
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To: TheSpottedOwl
Every time my grown kids need something, I hear from them.

My Dad had an interesting take on "children getting in touch with you."

He had a dozen siblings, and due to his father's premature death, he became the man of the family- he always said, "As long as I never heard from them, I knew they were doing OK. It was only when they got in a jam I'd hear something from them."

40 posted on 10/24/2005 5:47:16 AM PDT by backhoe (Just an old Keyboard Cowboy, ridin' the trakball into the Dawn of Information...)
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To: All
The following advice is lifted from a webpage which has generally good advice. I have highlighted my own additions in red, with an asterik, or made this [ * best advice ] designation for particularly important sections:
 
==================================================
 
Pre Event Actions:
 
1. Learn about the natural disasters that could occur in your community from your local emergency management office or American Red Cross chapter. Learn whether hazardous materials are produced, stored or transported near your area. Learn about possible consequences of deliberate acts of terror. Ask how to prepare for each potential emergency and how to respond.
 
2. Talk with employers and school officials about their emergency response plans.
 
3. Talk with your household about potential emergencies and how to respond to each. Talk about what you would need to do in an evacuation. If someone in the family has a critical job, expect them to be gone.
 
[ * best advice ]
4. Plan how your household would stay in contact if you were separated. Identify two meeting places: the first should be near your home—in case of fire, perhaps a tree or a telephone pole; the second should be away from your neighborhood in case you cannot return home.
 
[ * best advice ]
5. Pick a friend or relative who lives out of the area for household members to call to say they are okay.
 
6. Draw a floor plan of your home. Mark two escape routes from each room.
 
[ * best advice-- cell phone for everyone ]
7. Post emergency telephone numbers by telephones. Teach children how and when to call 911.
 
[ * best advice ]
8. Make sure everyone in your household knows how and when to shut off water, gas, and electricity at the main switches. Consult with your local utilities if you have questions.
 
[ * best advice ]
9. Take a first aid and CPR class. Local American Red Cross chapters can provide information. Official certification by the American Red Cross provides “good Samaritan” law protection for those giving first aid.
 
10. Reduce the economic impact of disaster on your property and your household’s health and financial well-being.
 
• Review property insurance policies before disaster strikes—make sure policies are current and be certain they meet your needs (type of coverage, amount of coverage, and hazard covered—flood, earthquake)
 
• Protect your household’s financial well-being before a disaster strikes— review life insurance policies and consider saving money in an “emergency” savings account that could be used in any crisis. It is advisable to keep a small amount of cash or traveler’s checks at home in a safe place where you can quickly gain access to it in case of an evacuation.
 
• Be certain that health insurance policies are current and meet the needs of your household.
 
11. Consider ways to help neighbors who may need special assistance, such as the elderly or the disabled.
 
12. Make arrangements for pets. Pets are not allowed in public shelters. Service animals for those who depend on them are allowed.
 
If you have a disability or special need, you may have to take additional steps to protect yourself and your household in an emergency. If you know of friends or neighbors with special needs, help them with these extra precautions. Hearing impaired may need to make special arrangements to receive warning. Mobility impaired may need assistance in getting to a shelter. Households with a single working parent may need help from others both in planning for disasters and during an emergency. People without vehicles may need to make arrangements for transportation. People with special dietary needs should have an adequate emergency food supply. Find out about special assistance that may be available in your community. Register with the office of emergency services or fire department for assistance, so needed help can be provided quickly in an emergency.
 
[ * best advice ]
Create a network of neighbors, relatives, friends and co-workers to aid you in an emergency. Discuss your needs and make sure they know how to operate necessary equipment.
 
Discuss your needs with your employer.
 
If you are mobility impaired and live or work in a high-rise building, have an escape chair. If you live in an apartment building, ask the management to mark accessible exits clearly and to make arrangements to help you evacuate the building. Keep extra wheelchair batteries, oxygen, catheters, medication, food for guide or hearing-ear dogs, or other items you might need. Also, keep a list of the type and serial numbers of medical devices you need.
 
Those who are not disabled should learn who in their neighborhood or building is disabled so that they may assist them during emergencies. If you are a care-giver for a person with special needs, make sure you have a plan to communicate if an emergency occurs.
 
Preparedness Overview:
 
[ * best advice ]
You may need to survive on your own for three days or more. This means having your own water, food and emergency supplies. Try using backpacks or duffel bags to keep the supplies together. Assembling the supplies you might need following a disaster is an important part of your disaster plan. You should prepare emergency supplies for the following situations:
 
A disaster supply kit with essential food, water, and supplies for at least three days—this kit should be kept in a designated place and be ready to “grab and go” in case you have to leave your home quickly because of a disaster, such as a flash flood or major chemical emergency. Make sure all household members know where the kit is kept.
 
Consider having additional supplies for sheltering or home confinement for up to two weeks.
 
You should also have a disaster supply kit at work. This should be in one container, ready to "grab and go" in case you have to evacuate the building. Remember to have a comfortable pair of shoes in case you need to walk long distances.
 
A car kit of emergency supplies, including food and water, to keep stored in your car at all times. This kit would also include flares, jumper cables, and seasonal supplies.
 
Stockpiling Water Safely
 
[ * best advice-- remember hot water heaters and toilet tanks ( not bowls! ) have perfectly safe water to drink ]
Stocking water reserves should be a top priority. Drinking water in emergency situations should not be rationed. Therefore, it is critical to store adequate amounts of water for your household. Individual needs vary, depending on age, physical condition, activity, diet, and climate. A normally active person needs at least two quarts of water daily just for drinking. Children, nursing mothers, and ill people need more. Very hot temperatures can double the amount of water needed. Because you will also need water for sanitary purposes and, possibly, for cooking, you should store at least one gallon of water per person per day.
 
Store water in thoroughly washed plastic, fiberglass or enamel-lined metal containers. Don't use containers that can break, such as glass bottles. Never use a container that has held toxic substances. Sound plastic containers, such as soft drink bottles, are best. You can also purchase food grade plastic buckets or drums. Containers for water should be rinsed with a diluted bleach solution (one part bleach to ten parts water) before use. Previously used bottles or other containers may be contaminated with microbes or chemicals. Do not rely on untested devices for decontaminating water.
 
If your water is treated commercially by a water utility, you do not need to treat water before storing it. Additional treatments of treated public water will not increase storage life. If you have a well or public water that has not been treated, follow the treatment instructions provided by your public health service or water provider. If you suspect that your well may be contaminated, contact your local or state health department or agriculture extension agent for specific advice.
 
Seal your water containers tightly, label them and store them in a cool, dark place. It is important to change stored water every six months.
 
Food:
 
If activity is reduced, healthy people can survive on half their usual food intake for an extended period or without any food for many days. Food, unlike water, may be rationed safely, except for children and pregnant women.
 
[ * best advice-- don't forget your animals- and don't forget, you can eat canned pet food & treats... ]
You don’t need to go out and buy unfamiliar foods to prepare an emergency food supply. You can use the canned foods, dry mixes and other staples on your cupboard shelves. Canned foods do not require cooking, water or special preparation. Be sure to include a manual can opener.
 
Keep canned foods in a dry place where the temperature is fairly cool. To protect boxed foods from pests and to extend their shelf life, store the food in tightly closed plastic or metal containers.
 
Replace items in your food supply every six months. Throw out any canned good that becomes swollen, dented, or corroded. Use foods before they go bad, and replace them with fresh supplies. Date each food item with a marker. Place new items at the back of the storage area and older ones in front.
 
Food items that you might consider including in your disaster supply kit include: ready-to-eat meats, fruits, and vegetables; canned or boxed juices, milk, and soup; high-energy foods like peanut butter, jelly, low-sodium crackers, granola bars, and trail mix; vitamins; foods for infants or persons on special diets; cookies, hard candy; instant coffee, cereals, and powdered milk.
 
Buy a box of MRE entrée’s – 72 packages of main course MRE meals and keep them at home. They will fee a familty of four for about a week. It’s no frills eating.
 
You may need to survive on your own after a disaster. Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster, but they cannot reach everyone immediately. You could get help in hours, or it may take days. Basic services, such as electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment and telephones, may be cut off for days, even a week or longer. Or you may have to evacuate at a moment’s notice and take essentials with you.
 
You probably won’t have the opportunity to shop or search for the supplies you’ll need. Your household will cope best by preparing for disaster before it strikes.
 

First aid:
· Sterile adhesive bandages in assorted sizes
· Assorted sizes of safety pins
· Isopropyl alcohol
· Hydrogen peroxide
· Antibiotic ointment
· Latex gloves (2 pairs)
· Petroleum jelly
· 2-inch and 4-inch sterile gauze pads (4-6 each size)
· Triangular bandages(3)
· 2-inch and 3-inch sterile rolled bandages (3 rolls each)
· Cotton balls
· Scissors
· Tweezers  [ * best advice-- splinter tweezers and a magnifying glass ]
· Needle
· Moistened towelettes
· Antiseptic
· Thermometer
· Tongue depressor blades (2)
· Tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant
· Sunscreen
· Aspirin
· Anti-diarrhea medication
· Antacid
· Tagamet
· Decongestant
· Cough Suppressant
· Space Blanket
· Mole Skin & Foam
· Epi-pin (?!?)
· Snake Bite Kit
·
 
[ My own 2 cents about medicine? Codeine, cortisone, asprin, and broad-spectrum antibiotics treat, or relieve, most conditions-- hoard what you can from old toothache prescriptions. Failing that, hard liquor will at least make the casualty feel better temporarily...
Veterinary medicines can be used on humans, usually, but adjust dosage by weight. ]
 
 
Tools:
· A portable, battery-powered radio and extra batteries [ * best advice- select only those that can run off a car battery ( cigarette lighter socket ) too. ]
· Flashlight(3), extra bulbs(6) & batteries(12)
· Oil Lamps (Hurricane)-- [ Coleman Lanterns, mantles, fuel ]
· Signal flare(6)
· Candles
· Matches [ * best advice-- kitchen ( strike anywhere )-- dip head in parrafin to waterproof ]
· Lighters
· Waterproof Matches
· Magnesium Fire Starter
· Paraffin
· Leather-man Tool(2) [ * best advice-- one per car ]
· All Purpose Knife(2) [ * best advice- penknife on keychain ]
· Duct tape  [ * best advice-- don't forget steel tape ( the shiny stuff ) and bailing, or mechanic's wire ]
· Scissors [ * best advice-- good idea, but don't forget construction knives, with extra blades stored in the handles-- one per car ]
· Plastic sheeting
· Whistle
· Small canister, A-B-C-type fire extinguisher(2) [ * best advice-- the biggest you can carry is none too big, and you need several for a fire ]
· Compass(2)
· Work gloves (2) [ * best advice-- don't forget rags-- a mechanic's rag can be used to grab rough or hot things, used as a bandage, etc. ]
· Paper, pens, and pencils [ * best advice-- Space Pen ]
· Needles and thread (2)
· Wrist Watch
· Honing Stone & Oil
· Hatchet [ * best advice-- a machete' is more useful ]
· Shovel
 
Kitchen items:
· Manual can opener [ * best advice ]
· Mess kit
· Fork & Spoon
· Knife
· Frying Pan
· Pots
· Plastic Forks, Spoons, Knives
· Heavy Duty Paper Plates
· PUR Drinking Water System
· Water Bottles
· Extra filters for PUR Water Filter
· Propane Stove
· Propane Grill
· Extra Case(s) Propane
· Heavy Duty Tin Foil
· Trioxane Stove
· Trioxane Fuel
· Sterno Fuel
· ZipLoc bags (Lg & Sm)
· Cooler
 

Food:
· Vitamins.
· Summer Sausage
· Hard Candy
· Freeze Dried Dinners
· Cup of Noodles
· Canned Veggies
· Canned Meats
· Canned Soups & Stews
· Coffee
· Tea
· Sugar
· Salt & Pepper [ * best advice- spices were worth their weight in gold 500 years ago   ]
 

Water(15g)
 
Sanitation and hygiene items:
· Washcloth and towel
· Towelettes
· Soap
· Hand sanitizer
· Liquid detergent
· Tooth paste and toothbrushes
· Shampoo
· Deodorant
· Feminine Supplies [ * best advice-- sanitary pads double as field dressings for wounds ]
· Razor
· Shaving cream
· Lip balm
· Sunscreen
· Insect repellent
· Heavy-duty plastic garbage bags (to go potty in)
· Toilet paper [ * best advice ]
· Medium-sized plastic bucket with tight lid
· Disinfectant
· Chlorine bleach
· Shovel (for a latrine)
 
Documents:
· Personal identification
· Cash [ * best advice ]
· Emergency phone numbers [ * best advice- all important numbers ]
· Map of the area
 
Misc:
· Extra pair of prescription glasses [ * best advice ]
· Candles
· Carton of Cigarettes [ * best advice-- in natural disasters, cigs are valuable barter items ]
· Tequila[ * best advice-- in natural disasters, liquor is a  valuable barter item ]
· Extra set of car & house keys [ * best advice ]
· Reading material, books, etc.
 
Clothing (no cotton): [ * best advice-- don't agree about "no cotton"-- cotton breaths, unlike synthetics ]
· Heavy Boots
· Wool Socks
· Rain gear
· Hat w/ visor  [ * best advice-- a hat shields both heat and cold- visor improves vision ]
· Gloves
· Sunglasses
· Capelin Pants (4)
· Wind pants
· Polypro Shirt (2)(short sleeve)
· Polortech Shirt (2)(Long sleeve) [ * best advice- long sleeve only- they can be rolled up ]
· Polartech Pants (2)
· Polypro Boxers(5)
· Gortex/Thinsulate Parka
· Gortex/Thinsulate Bibs
 
Shelter:
· Sleeping bag
· Sleeping pad
· Tent
· Small Tarps
· Large Tarp
· Folding Chair
· Nylon Cord
 
Weapons:  [  * shotgun, rifle, sidearm ( pistol ), one per family member- ammunition. If practical, keep calibres and gauges the same. ]
 
============================================================================================
 

41 posted on 10/27/2005 12:14:30 PM PDT by backhoe (-30-)
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To: Armedanddangerous

I will have you know I went to the range 3 times since we had our discussion. Today I picked up my new Taurus 24/7 9mm shot 50 rounds and loved it. I actually think I am a better shot than with my .40


42 posted on 10/28/2005 4:33:58 PM PDT by TheRedSoxWinThePennant
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To: TheRedSoxWinThePennant

I've seen that particular gun but never fired it. Did you get any high capacity magazines with it?

One of the reasons to carry/own a nine millimeter pistol is the ability to own a slew of 17 round magazines.

I have seven high caps for my glock 17. I have a friend in Palm Bay that has twenty for his two glocks, and loads them whenever a hurricane is coming, in case the looters come back to his neighborhood, which they do on occasion.

If you keep the 9mm loaded for home defense, please don't load it with FMJ ball ammunition. Get some kind of decent hollow point bullet.

I use 127 gr Winchester Ranger +P+


43 posted on 10/28/2005 9:35:30 PM PDT by Armedanddangerous (Liberals are so stupid, they couldn't spell cat if you spotted them the C and the A.)
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To: All
 Thoughts On Urban Survival (Post-Collapse Life in Argentina)

FReeper Laz's Account of Wilma and Aftermath

44 posted on 10/29/2005 4:37:43 PM PDT by backhoe (-30-)
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To: Armedanddangerous

It came with 2 17 round magazines! I went with the wife today and we fired off a 150 rounds between us. Lots of fun!


45 posted on 10/29/2005 5:06:02 PM PDT by TheRedSoxWinThePennant
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To: All
Nuclear, Biological, & Chemical Warfare- Survival Skills, Pt. II

-Terror Tips--

46 posted on 02/06/2006 3:06:54 PM PST by backhoe (-30-)
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To: backhoe

Don't forget old eyeglasses as spares, in case you break or lose yours, and eyeglass repair kits. Preferrably, the type with a magnifying glass!


47 posted on 02/11/2006 5:25:40 AM PST by backhoe
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To: All
#226 nonic  2/21/2006 03:15AM PST
 

#213 littleoldlady

BTW, do you sell your crafts?

No. What I like to do is experiment, research, learn, and teach.

When I got involved in spinning 20 years ago, I realized that there is a (scattered world-wide) community of people (men as well as women, but more women) who are keeping alive skills and knowledge that took mankind thousands of years to develop but are now being forgotten, lost, becoming unknown.

There was a time when every thread -- for every piece of cloth, for every sail and "line" on every ship, for every candle wick, for every artist's canvas, for every fishing line and net, and for everything else that was fiber-based -- was spun by hand.

For thousands of years, the technology didn't improve over the drop spindle. How To Make A Drop Spindle & How to Use a Drop Spindle

This is a very slow process, and it took many people nearly all their "free" time to supply the weaver or rope maker.

Then during the Renaissance, the wheel and flyer were developed, vastly speeding up the process. Choosing a Spinning Wheel Today

And then in the Industrial Revolution, all this knowledge and skill and progress was set aside.

Keeping that alive and advancing this part of human achievement is what is of most interest to me.

And, of course, the sheer fun and personal satisfaction. And the "therapeutic" value. And the wonderful community of people out there who love the fiber crafts and share so much.

Huh. Now you know why the entire living room is going to be the craft room. :-)

 

48 posted on 02/21/2006 3:26:23 AM PST by backhoe
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To: All
What's the best kind of generator, fuel-wise; propane, gas or diesel, for my home?  KEYWORDS: GENERATORS; POWEROUTAGE;
 

49 posted on 02/27/2006 7:27:56 AM PST by backhoe
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To: backhoe

We seldom have an emergency in this area that takes out water and electric – but the last time it happened (Hurricane Isabel in 2003) many lost power for several weeks with a lot of areas destroyed. My neighborhood was lucky – we lost power for about a day and a half and had little damage – but it was a wake up call.
While my survival supplies are not as extensive as those listed – a one bedroom apartment lacks space – I do have the necessities.
Basic tools, water purification, canned food (which I rotate on a regular basis) that include carbohydrates as well as meat, veggies, fruits and dog food for The Boogie. My first aid kit is well stocked and I know how to use it. I also keep a small emergency supply of ammunition and maintain proficiency with my firearms. Everything but fresh water is contained in one “bug out bag” along with a strong box containing computer disks with account numbers, insurance policies, cash etc. I won’t have to hunt around and look for things if I have to leave.


50 posted on 02/27/2006 7:48:27 AM PST by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink.)
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