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Hunt treasure in dumpsters, thrift stores
Wisconsin Dells Events ^ | 10-25-05 | Kay Lapp James

Posted on 10/25/2005 6:37:45 PM PDT by SJackson

Before I could write my column this week, I had to take an hour off to watch "Antiques Roadshow" on PBS, locally WHA. It feeds my fantasy of finding or buying an item and have it turn out to be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars.

The show always has a few people who either bought an item at a yard sale for a dollar or two or found it. For example, Monday's show featured a man who went dumpster diving and found a rare print by John Turnbull of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. It was worth $700 to $800. That's not a bad find.

A woman on the show had something even more valuable: a Cartier cigarette case worth thousands. It had been given to her mother, who owned a restaurant. The mother took it from a hungry man in exchange for three breakfasts. The woman had kept it in a box under her bed along with other items her mother had taken in exchange for food when people couldn't pay for meals. When she got home, she planned to check through the box to see what else she could find. I certainly would and would seek a good appraiser too.

My favorite antiques story comes from the British edition of "Antiques Roadshow." A woman who was the supervisor for a dumpsite in Britain collected jewelry she found over the years in the garbage. Her collection was worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, and it had come from garbage.

I'm left with the question of how it got in the garbage. Did someone cleaning house mistake real gems for fake ones and because she didn't like the style throw it in the garbage? Alternatively, did the piece fall into the garbage by mistake and was not missed for so long no one had any idea to where it disappeared? Or, maybe someone with a lot of money got mad at whomever gave her the jewelry and threw it away to flout him.

I think the show has spurred me to haunting thrift stores, flea markets and yard sales. I keep hoping that an item that catches my eye and is cheap will really be worth a fortune or at least much more than I paid. I don't know if this has ever happened, although I have bought plenty from such places. I never take any of my finds to antiques dealers or appraisers. I guess I am not optimistic enough that I will be that fortunate.

If I really wanted antiques, I should go to antique stores and shows. However, they scare me. I'm afraid my knowledge of antiques is too limited, and I would end up either paying more than something is worth, or I would buy a reproduction rather than a real antique.

I should go to some of the reputable dealers in the area, but I really don't have the money to buy antiques. My pocketbook squeezes me into the used market.

Anything we buy for our homes may someday become an antique -- provided not many people keep that particular style. For example, our parents and grandparents bought dinnerware in a style now known as Depression glass. It was cheap and colorful with many intricate patterns. You could buy it at the dime store in the 20s, 30s and 40s for next to nothing.

Many people probably donated it to thrift stores or sold it at yard sales when they got tired of it or their children didn't want it. Perhaps it even went out with the garbage, because nobody thought it was worth much.

Today, Depression glass is highly valued and collected by many people who will pay a hundred times what a piece sold for originally.

My plan is to find nice pieces of anything that might become an antique and hold on to them for years until they become valuable. Of course, I'm still limited by money and by space -- no house is ever big enough if you become a collector and you never have enough money.

If I could just find one item and take it to "Antiques Roadshow" maybe, I'd make some money. I believe my chances are probably as good as buying a lottery ticket and a lot more fun.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: antiques; collectibles; dumpsterdiving; hobby; lucky; shopping
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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1 posted on 10/25/2005 6:37:46 PM PDT by SJackson
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To: ButThreeLeftsDo; Iowa Granny; Ladysmith; Diana in Wisconsin; JLO; sergeantdave; damncat; ...
If you'd like to be on or off this new (maybe) Upper Midwest (WI, IA, MN, MI, and anyone else) list, largely rural and outdoors issues, please FR mail me. And ping me is you see articles of interest.

A little off topic, I admit.

2 posted on 10/25/2005 6:38:16 PM PDT by SJackson (God isn`t dead. We just can`t talk to Him in the classroom anymore, R Reagan.)
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To: DumpsterDiver

(heh)


3 posted on 10/25/2005 6:39:57 PM PDT by Bradís Gramma (FR1....Varoooooom, Varooooooom!!!)
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To: SJackson

If you find any Microsoft stock certificates issued around 1985, give me a call!


4 posted on 10/25/2005 6:45:05 PM PDT by operation clinton cleanup
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To: SJackson

I frequent the ebay vintage clothing board. There are many ladies who make a living from shopping in Salvation Army and Goodwill stores, yard sales and estate sales. They research the stuff and sell them on ebay.

The board is educational and explains different eras, patterns, etc. of vintage clothes.

There is one woman who sells 70's and 80's junk clothes, but has fantastic stylists and photos. She caters to teenyboppers with lots of cash. Mamastonevintage is the envy of ebay vintage sellers.


5 posted on 10/25/2005 7:07:15 PM PDT by japaneseghost
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To: japaneseghost
Oh, wow, you mean hip-hugger bell-bottoms and tube tops are coming back??????!!!! FAR OUT, MAN! My first girlfriend wore that stuff ... and ... uh ... FAR OUT, MAN!
6 posted on 10/25/2005 7:15:57 PM PDT by manwiththehands
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To: SJackson; Brad's Gramma; japaneseghost; DumpsterDiver; manwiththehands
The writer has a point ~ I know because back when I was selling on eBay it worked for me most of the time!

My two best finds included a bakelite bracelet I found at the local Goodwill Store which I bought for $1.00 which, when I put it on eBay, sold for over $300.00 and an old framed print by a famous artist I found in a small thrift store that I paid $25.00 for and sold on eBay for over $800.00!

7 posted on 10/25/2005 7:20:53 PM PDT by Zacs Mom (Proud wife of a Marine! ... and purveyor of "rampant, unedited dialogue")
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To: SJackson

The thing the person described is an actual job -- those people are called "pickers" in the antique business. They mostly have a fair knowledge of a lot of different fields, furniture, glass jewelry, and a good eye. They travel across country or regions snooping in garage sales and thrift stores for un-discovered gems. When they find one, they sell it to a dealer who then launches it into the antiques pipeline.


8 posted on 10/25/2005 7:21:02 PM PDT by durasell
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To: SJackson

Hasn't "Antiques Road Show" been busted for inflating values and trying to help hoodwink insurance companies?


9 posted on 10/25/2005 7:22:11 PM PDT by SeriousSassy (I know manure when I step in it!)
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To: Zacs Mom

I started with 'rescuing' pottery and glass...

now I seem to pick up 'everything'....sigh....


10 posted on 10/25/2005 7:27:50 PM PDT by bitt (THE PRESIDENT: "Ask the pollsters. My job is to lead and to solve problems. ")
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To: Zacs Mom; SJackson

I bought the Cosmopolitan edition of the first Male nude, Burt Reynolds, as I knew someday it would be worth alot. Unfortunately one of my kids got ahold of it and it disappeared. :-(


11 posted on 10/25/2005 7:33:05 PM PDT by Spunky ("Everyone has a freedom of choice, but not of consequences.")
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To: manwiththehands

Dang, you must be really old! :o)


12 posted on 10/25/2005 7:33:12 PM PDT by derllak
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To: SJackson
Please add me to your ping list. I was (time currently doesn't permit) an avid eBayer for a couple of years. And I do want to go back to it.

What you called Depression Glass I actually sold. Mine was actually sold as Westmoreland Glass (McKee, Jeanette, Westmoreland) companies that produced glass dishes and giftware in the early to mid 20th century. It was made in abudance locally...first rule of eBaying, sell something you can easily find yourself.

13 posted on 10/25/2005 7:35:16 PM PDT by PennsylvaniaMom (Shiny things distract me :))
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To: SeriousSassy

I thought it was undervaluing and buying the goods.

Maybe google will help us.


14 posted on 10/25/2005 7:36:25 PM PDT by razorback-bert
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To: SeriousSassy

One famous segment involved a rather nondescript sword brought onto the show in 1997. The owner claimed to have used it, in his youth, to slice watermelons. Appraiser George Juno excitedly declared the sword a remarkable Civil War find worth $35,000, and instructed the bewildered owner to handle it in the future only while wearing white gloves. This was classic “Roadshow” -- an unassuming piece of rust, brought in by an owner who figured “What the hell; guess I’ll see if this is worth anything,” turns out to be a portable Brinks truck.

Trouble is, that quintessential segment was faked. The Boston Herald recently investigated; turns out, the appraiser had orchestrated the entire appraisal. This wasn’t Joe Q. Public stumbling onto an attic goldmine; this was a scheme by a businessman to cook up some free publicity for himself.


15 posted on 10/25/2005 7:38:43 PM PDT by razorback-bert
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To: derllak

I'm not THAT old. Did you ever watch "That 70's Show"? :) I was one of the kids ... :o)


16 posted on 10/25/2005 7:40:10 PM PDT by manwiththehands
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To: SJackson

Found a metal tape measure "H.B. Maynard Co." with case all metal too. It's a hard-to-find item.


17 posted on 10/25/2005 7:41:42 PM PDT by MeneMeneTekelUpharsin (Freedom is the freedom to discipline yourself so others don't have to do it for you.)
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To: SeriousSassy

This is not the first time that ethics questions have dogged the pair. In June 1999 Pritchard and the AOPA were found liable in federal civil court of defrauding George Pickett V over artifacts of his ancestor, the famous general who made the futile charge at Gettysburg, artifacts that Pritchard purchased for $87,500 and were later sold for over $850,000.


18 posted on 10/25/2005 7:42:13 PM PDT by razorback-bert
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To: razorback-bert

Yes. Google records a number of problems with Antiques Roadshow. Which doesn't mean it's not fun to watch, hehe.

As a flea market vendor, I was shocked at the attitude of some other vendors who never missed ROADSHOW so they could exploit items evn remotely similar to anything on the show. Naive me!


19 posted on 10/25/2005 7:42:41 PM PDT by SeriousSassy (I know manure when I step in it!)
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To: SJackson; DumpsterDiver

Pinging ya DD...;-)


20 posted on 10/25/2005 7:46:11 PM PDT by azhenfud (He who always is looking up seldom finds others' lost change.)
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To: razorback-bert

I'll never forget that sword segment. It is one of my favorite TV moments, and it's as though I just saw it yesterday. I am shocked to find out it was faked by the appraiser. The young man seemed so earnest, and the whole story was so believable.

Thanks for the truth, but I hate hearing it.


21 posted on 10/25/2005 7:49:33 PM PDT by Semper911
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To: bitt
I know what you mean! It's easy to get caught up in the treasure hunting ~ my 'collecting' went from old books and teacups to just about anything that looked interesting! LOL

I finally seemed to run out of space ~ I was no longer selling because I began providing full-time care for an ailing elderly family member and didn't have time to do it anymore, so I had to really reign myself in!

22 posted on 10/25/2005 7:51:13 PM PDT by Zacs Mom (Proud wife of a Marine! ... and purveyor of "rampant, unedited dialogue")
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To: SeriousSassy

I stick to documented stuff. The 1992 Postcard Ballot issued by the Post Office to the public so they can vote on which version of the Elvis Presley stamp should be printed. Millions of them were free for the public in the lobby of Post Offices. Today one of them cards sell for 3 to 6 dollars in Mint/Near Mint condition. I scuffed lots of them and will let my son or grandchildren have them.


23 posted on 10/25/2005 7:54:46 PM PDT by Fee (`+Great powers never let minor allies dictate who, where and when they must fight.)
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To: SJackson

I'm an artist and I'm always on the look out for cheap supplies in the thrifts and curb-shopping.

No treasures yet but I'm still hopeful.


24 posted on 10/25/2005 8:01:32 PM PDT by WIladyconservative (Save us from future Freepathons - set up a monthly donation!)
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To: SeriousSassy

"Hasn't "Antiques Road Show" been busted for inflating values and trying to help hoodwink insurance companies?"

I know a few of their appraisers have been busted for giving low appraisials on air, and later approaching that guest offering to buy their stuff.


25 posted on 10/25/2005 8:02:21 PM PDT by Gum Shoe
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To: manwiththehands

Oh, yeah! You're the pervert with the plaid pants and the big afro, right? I was just a wee one in those times. Thank goodness I missed it!


26 posted on 10/25/2005 8:15:44 PM PDT by derllak
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To: SJackson

The only thing of interest that I read being hidden in a dumpster was Eric Rudolph.


27 posted on 10/25/2005 8:20:03 PM PDT by Brofholdonow
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To: SJackson
My best find (so far): A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole, LSU Press, 1st Ed., 1st state, for 50 cents at an AAUW book fair. In this condition (no better than "good"), I've seen them sell for $500 on Ebay. (Pristine copies have gone for almost ten times that at auction.) I'll put it up someday on Ebay. Maybe.
28 posted on 10/25/2005 8:41:29 PM PDT by Physicist
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To: Physicist

I bought a metal robot at a garage sale for a quarter when I was about ten. It was pretty impressive, the eyes flashed, arms moved, legs moved back and forth while gears turned wheels in the feet, and it had a traversing laser cannon in its chest that flashed and made pretty good laser noises.

Impressive or not, interest soon waned so I took it apart and scored a goodly number of gears, belts and motors.

About ten years ago they had the exact robot at an antiques show selling for $450.

Back when I was twenty or so, and in the market for a car, there was an ad in a local paper for a 1960 Jaguar, XK150 Drophead Coupe. I drove an hour to take a look at it, and ended up "test driving" it around the hilly southern part of the state for longer than that. The owner wasn't too pleased, but there weren't any warrants out when I returned the car.

The asking price was $3100, I had $3000 to spend, and I know I could have talked him down to a price I could afford. The car was cherry with the exception of the solid mahogany spars that supported the convertible roof. They were rotted out, but the owner had bought new ones, without installing them yet.

Thinking I was making an adult decision, (a rare occurrance even 25 years later) I decided not to buy it, because buying an old Jag for primary transportation just doesn't pass the common sense test. Especially not a convertible, when the February temps around here have been known to drop to minus 29 F before.

The price tag on another one just like it, at an auto show several years later, was $25,000.


29 posted on 10/25/2005 8:58:19 PM PDT by jeffers
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To: Physicist
Many moons ago, I was dating this girl(great gooch btw), well, I met her family who happened to own an antique store.

They were nice people and I admired a painting they had in the store, ( the dogs playing poker), long story short, Her Mother gave me the painting for Christmas...It turns out that its signed by Coolidge and is supposed to be worth 30K.

I still have the picture but would swap it for the gal back. (Did I mention that was great gooch?).
30 posted on 10/25/2005 9:23:08 PM PDT by Beagle8U
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To: azhenfud; Brad's Gramma
Say, you two wouldn't be snickering behind my back, now would you? ;^)

There are treasures in those dumpsters, I tell ya!

31 posted on 10/25/2005 9:34:39 PM PDT by DumpsterDiver
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To: SJackson

I have a good story for you. About 45 years ago my father in law found a painting on top of a pile of trash in the basement of an old apartment building. It had been cut out of the fame and was rolled up. It was a painting of Sam Houston painted early in the 1900's (not during Houston's life time). At one time it hung in the Texas state Capitol but disappeared from there many years ago. The story that we learned was that the artist expected to be paid by the state and when that didn't happen, he took it back. It is in my husbands office now, we don't know what it is worth, but I imagine it is pretty valuable. Another one of Sam Houston by the same artist and in almost the same pose, hangs in the courthouse in Houston.


32 posted on 10/25/2005 9:38:48 PM PDT by Ditter
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To: DumpsterDiver

"There are treasures in those dumpsters, I tell ya!"



I know!!!!!! :)


33 posted on 10/25/2005 10:30:23 PM PDT by Bradís Gramma (FR1....Varoooooom, Varooooooom!!!)
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To: SJackson

The best story I remember coming across concerned one of smaller NYC museums. Several years ago it was reported that in their archives they found a scrap of paper with some doodles/sketches on it. Well, it turned out to be $12 million Michelangelo [although how to authenticate an unsigned scrap of paper with some minor sketches/doodles is a mystery to me]. And since the old guy was sketching all his life since age 13, there must have been some 20000+ of these.


34 posted on 10/25/2005 10:39:06 PM PDT by GSlob
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To: SJackson
okay....so I bought an original water color by an artist by the name of Giraldine Fallon Merrill, out of California...I know its and original because it still has the brown paper cover on the back, although its a little torn...

there is a letter written about the artist pasted on the back, and a note....

it seems this lady was the "Grandma Moses of California" and exhibited across the country and at the Western whitehouse at San Clemente for Richard Nixon....

I don't know if its worth anything, but it is interesting....

35 posted on 10/25/2005 11:22:30 PM PDT by cherry
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To: Spunky

you know, my girlfriends got in big trouble for posting that Bert Reynolds pic on the nun's door at the school we went to.......it was a strict nursing school run by nuns and this particular nun was in charge and a very, very strange nun in many ways and very old......LOL


36 posted on 10/25/2005 11:25:22 PM PDT by cherry
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To: SJackson
If you'd like to be on or off this new (maybe) Upper Midwest (WI, IA,
MN, MI, and anyone else) list, largely rural and outdoors issues,
please FR mail me. And ping me is you see articles of interest.

A little off topic, I admit.<<<<<<<<<

If I prove that I can possibly be of help to the thread, will you allow someone from Arizona on the list?

As I am not able to get out of the house now adays, you will need to settle for my memories of auctions and garage sales of the past.

I learned all that I could about antiques, by reading the books from the library, this is the most important education that you can get, as you must learn the trade marks and where they will be found on the items.

After you reach the point that you know what and where the
makers marks are to be found, then go to the antique stores and try to see the items that you learned about.

In time, if you have the eye, you will be able to spot the real ones, across the room.

To me the old glass has a "feel", the reproductions are almost soulless, they are cold.

A friend started teaching me in about 1955, and we worked the sales together, as our interests were different.

Before she passed away, ten years ago, she said that the one mistake she had made, was in trying to "learn it all", instead of becoming a specialist, as she did in later years on dolls.

My personality, is more of the I want to know it all, so I
never became a specialist in any one area and learned only enough to be dangerous.

I have not thought of antiques in many years, as this area is a poor area for them, so even when I was out and around, they were not to be found.

I never found the million dollar antiques, but did buy cheap and twice, sold them to support my husband when he was sick.

Even had enough to open a small antique store in mid 1970 and
still have more than I can take care of.

Most of it bought at garage sales and swap meets.

Choose something that you like.

Choose something that you will find in your area.

In old towns, you may find glass and fine antiques.

In farm areas, you will find the old, kitchen and barn antiques.

Try not to be like me, china, glass and a horse drawn cultivator.

You will need books in the chosen area of interest, but the best book for prices and getting a feel for the subject, that I know of and used was the Kovel's price list and you should be able to find it on line, possibly at: half.com

The latest issue that i have is 2000, but there should be later issues, there was a copy of this type book, but I cannot recall the name of it, it was not as good, but worth
reading.

The other books, start with the library books, as you don't need all of them and they will give you an idea of the ones that you want to own, never mind the fancy new books, look for the histories of the subjects, that has the real facts in them.

Kovel's
Antiques and Collectibles
Price list (try for 2005, unless buying the old books).

Published by:
Three Rivers Press
201 East 50th Street
New York, New York 10022

Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 83-643618

IBSN 0-609-80471-5 (pbk)

Above numbers are for the year 2000 edition.

The first page is a list of books on the antiques, you might want to start the library search with the other Kovel books.

I will not be able to help with Ebay or television, my computer is too old for Ebay and I don't own a TV.

I do hope my rambling is of use to you......have fun and be
careful.
37 posted on 10/25/2005 11:49:04 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny (For better health, plant a few winter greens in a pot,put in a sunny window,Oriental greens do well)
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To: SJackson

Bought a copy of "The Sheltering Sky" in the East Village for $5. It turned out to be autographed by the author, Paul Bowles, who has not left Tunisia since the 1950s.


38 posted on 10/25/2005 11:53:03 PM PDT by Clemenza (Gentlemen, Behold!)
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To: MamaDearest; DAVEY CROCKETT; lacylu; LucyT; LibertyRocks; WestCoastGal; jerseygirl; Honestly; ...

This thread has lots of promise for learning about new items.


39 posted on 10/25/2005 11:55:28 PM PDT by nw_arizona_granny (For better health, plant a few winter greens in a pot,put in a sunny window,Oriental greens do well)
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To: japaneseghost; All
Watch for the old patterns at sales.

Don't laugh, but I went through mine a couple years ago and I still have the sewing patterns from the 1950's, not many up to date ones, but lots of old ones.

They sell for $25.00 and up, some get that much for reprints.

There are a couple of ladies on the Internet, that sell photocopies of toy patterns, at about $5.00 for 5 or 6 pages.

They are the old ones from 1950 back, the older the more expensive.

I did check a couple of the sellers sales lists for the toy patterns, it was in the thousands.

For that nice steady income, I could photocopy all day, as I would love envelopes with $5.00 bills coming in every day.

I long ago decided that selling information was a better project, than shipping the heavy stuff.

You will need to pay attention to the copy-write laws, which I am very out of date on.

Old lace and trims are valuable as is the actual materials, if in large enough pieces.

Estate sales are good places for fabrics and patterns.
40 posted on 10/26/2005 12:07:00 AM PDT by nw_arizona_granny (For better health, plant a few winter greens in a pot,put in a sunny window,Oriental greens do well)
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To: Zacs Mom

I've found lots of personal gems at the thrift store. Just clothes, sports gear, etc. for myself and familly. Trick is to go often! (and quickly!). I work outside so work shirts and jackets are my isle. Of course I'll buy a $2 shirt and it's so nice it becomes my church-going shirt! I think my best deal was a clean (new?) full-length goose down L.L. Bean coat for my wife - about $15. I think. (1/2 price sale!!)


41 posted on 10/26/2005 12:10:44 AM PDT by geopyg (I BELIEVE CONGRESSMAN WELDON! (Ever Vigilant, Never Fearful))
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To: nw_arizona_granny; All

Thanks for the ping to this thread. I LOVE thrift stores. Unfortunately, the ones I've found so far here in upper Wisconsin aren't quite as good as the ones in Denver.

FYI for everyone: ARC Thrift stores are the BEST if you happen to be in Colorado/Denver. They used to have 50% off sales at least once per month on clothes and such (great for families on budgets as some of the children's clothes are in brand-new condition if you get there early enough on sales days).


42 posted on 10/26/2005 1:41:55 AM PDT by LibertyRocks (Comprehensive info RE: OU Bombing and more... http://sweetliberty.alfablog.com)
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To: derllak
My generation (i.e. growing up in the 60's and adolescence during the 70's) saw some pretty crazy stuff. No one should have to live through all that lunacy at such an impressionable age. :)
43 posted on 10/26/2005 5:07:56 AM PDT by manwiththehands
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To: manwiththehands
I'm not THAT old. Did you ever watch "That 70's Show"? :) I was one of the kids ... :o)

You roo!

That was my basement circa 1977 =;-)

44 posted on 10/26/2005 5:17:17 AM PDT by KosmicKitty (Not too worry - we'll all be united again under the next Clinton presidency!!)
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To: SJackson
After all these hurricanes, I'd love to go dumpster hopping in these areas. My company once hired several homeless people. These folks were experts in dumpsterology, mostly finding treasures left by departing college students.
45 posted on 10/26/2005 5:28:10 AM PDT by wolfcreek
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To: SJackson
I'm a pawn shop junkie. Like thrift stores, you never know what you will find. I am a watch collector, among other things.

I bought a jewelers roll-up full of them, from a guy on 14th st in DC, for a grand. It contained a couple of expensive watches, worth a lot more than my thou.

One of them, though, was a ringer, I thought. It had the name "Birks" on it. But, upon inspection, I noticed the name "Rolex" in tiny letters, on the bottom of the face.

At home, I opened tha stainless back. The case was 18k yellow, on this rectangular watch. Inside it was stamped Rolex. The movement also had the stamp Rolex!

It was missing the hands, and had no strap. but I had taken it, along with the rest of them.

I took it to a watch repairman at Fair Oaks mall, in Fairfax, VA. He was from Indian, and had lots of spare parts he had brought from retiring European shops. He looked at it, and suggested we send it to Switzerland, for inspection, or authentication.

I got a letter back from Rolex, offering 10 grand for it, so they could put it in their museum. It was made in the early 1900's, by them, for the Birks jewelry stores in Canada. Birk's had 18 specially made with a stainless back, due to the workmen's lifestyle, of those that bought them.

I asked to have it returned, and my watchmaker set some newer ROLEX hands on the beautiful filgreed face. I wear it occasionally, but it is really too dressy and fragile for everyday use. I have a Seiko, for that.

I ended up with over $85k in value, from that $1K investment, but nothing I bought, is for sale... I collect old watches...

46 posted on 10/26/2005 5:37:16 AM PDT by pageonetoo (You'll spot their posts soon enough!)
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To: pageonetoo

that is the coolest thing i have ever heard! where is the jewelry repair guy in Fair Oaks Mall? i used to go to Root Jewelers in Rosyln to have my watches cleaned and serviced but it is too hard to park over there.


47 posted on 10/26/2005 5:40:00 AM PDT by xsmommy
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To: SJackson

http://www.audiokarma.org

Audio finds and refurbs


48 posted on 10/26/2005 5:40:09 AM PDT by AppyPappy (If you aren't part of the solution, there is good money to be made prolonging the problem.)
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To: SJackson
Anyone remember the traveling dog and pony shows looking for "old silver and Japanese swords?
If one knew how to read the marks under the handle wrappers, they made a fortune selling the real old ones back to the Japanese family it represented.
49 posted on 10/26/2005 5:42:12 AM PDT by investigateworld (Abortion stops a beating heart)
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To: pageonetoo

Ah, that is the difference between someone who collects for the appreciation of the item, and a reseller who is only looking to turn a fast buck.


50 posted on 10/26/2005 5:45:38 AM PDT by unsycophant
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