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Where's today's Rosa? Civil rights movement started with Parks, but ended with King.
New York Daily News ^ | Originally published on November 3, 2005 | Stanley Crouch

Posted on 11/03/2005 7:49:32 AM PST by .cnI redruM

There's a reason thousands of people turned out for Rosa Parks' funeral yesterday. On Dec. 1, 1955, when she refused to lift her bottom from a bus seat in Montgomery so that a white man could put his down, American history was cut into two parts - before the civil rights movement and after it.

Parks had no idea that her refusal would become a standard by which the nonviolent movement would judge itself as it grew to take on all of the grand dragons of Southern segregation. Yet it is important to understand that Rosa Parks, the young Martin Luther King Jr. and the many others whom we came to associate with the civil rights movement were not the petulant adolescents we saw take over most protest movements within 10 years.

The civil rights movement was a shooting star that brought much light, but it really only lasted until Martin Luther King was assassinated in 1968. By then, King was already losing ground to the separatist and "revolutionary" fantasies that misled younger black people into laughable obsessions with Africa. Ethnic identity became largely cosmetic. There was also the camouflage gear that has yet to leave us, and the addled admiration of mush-mouthed "leaders" like the Black Panthers.

It is almost 50 years since Rosa Parks took her position in the pantheon with Abigail Adams, Harriet Tubman and all of the rest of the remarkable American women who fought for women's rights, abolition, public education and the endlessly important aspects of the public good that could not come into existence unless people stood up to all that held them back. We have come a long way and are still behind the eight ball because the civil rights organizations are largely ineffectual, and the tribal impulses that had nothing to do with the civil rights movement have become, once again, a threat to the hard facts of what will get us out of this ongoing mess.

Affirmative action and the diversity hustle are now well established responses to bigotry. However important such policies might be for now, the irony is that they make it possible for our nation to continue to avoid the big, raggedy elephant in the room - inadequate public education. Hidden behind quotas and set-asides, the idea of providing high-quality education across the lines of color and class remains in the shadows.

We need a movement focused on this problem. Quality education is central to our getting as near as possible to equality, which actually means an equal chance to compete, not equal privilege.

Things are surely much better than they were when Rosa Parks declined to get up, but with a much clearer understanding of what we need in order to develop our population - which is always our greatest natural resource - we could do much, much better right now.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: calledout; civilrights; parks; rosaparks; stanleycrouch
I guess today's Rosa is too busy chucking Oreo COokies at Shelby Steele.
1 posted on 11/03/2005 7:49:33 AM PST by .cnI redruM
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To: .cnI redruM
Parks had no idea that her refusal would become a standard by which the nonviolent movement would judge itself as it grew to take on all of the grand dragons of Southern segregation.

First of all, I am a Rosa Parks fan because I believe she was fairly conservative, and she was a big fan of JC Watts.

Having said that, I heard on a conservative talk station that the whole incident was something of a set-up. She worked for the NAACP and the plan was to have her refuse, then use this incident to sue the city.

I have no problem with the tactic really, but if this is true, it bothers me because of the mythology that has arisen around the incident. As I have gotten older, I realise that much of Liberalism is based on Mythology, thus I consider it a religion.

2 posted on 11/03/2005 7:58:12 AM PST by Paradox (Just because we are not perfect, does not mean we are not good.)
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To: .cnI redruM

Content of character over color of skin is supposed to actually mean something.


3 posted on 11/03/2005 7:59:52 AM PST by cyclotic (Cub Scouts-Teach 'em young to be men, and politically incorrect in the process)
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To: Paradox

Interesting if true. The NAACP was actually a lot more skillful and careful back then. Perhaps it was out of dire necessity.


4 posted on 11/03/2005 8:00:36 AM PST by .cnI redruM (Because change is not something you talk into existence.)
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To: .cnI redruM

I usually do not agree with Stanley Crouch, but on this subject he hits the nail squarely on the head. American Blacks are totally lost and are going down further. A small item such as the tossing of Oreo cookies at Shelby Steele speaks volumes of the current plight of American Blacks. No sense going into detail here, but unless American Blacks get rid of their racism, their current leaders and the Democrat Party, they are going nowhere fast. Assimilation, assimilation, assimilation, Education, Education, Education. Crouch is right, when MLK died, and now Mother Parks, all that is left for American Blacks is hatred of the white man and economic slavery from Black leaders and the Democrat Party. What a waste of humanity!!!


5 posted on 11/03/2005 8:01:18 AM PST by JLAGRAYFOX
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To: Paradox
I agree with the "religion" bit - my Atlanta paper ran a headline reading "Mother Rosa"
6 posted on 11/03/2005 8:01:29 AM PST by freedomlover (This Fall a Woman will be the Mother of a Mouse)
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To: JLAGRAYFOX

>>>>A small item such as the tossing of Oreo cookies at Shelby Steele

Sad. Steele should have asked them if they had any Double Stuffs and a glass of milk.


7 posted on 11/03/2005 8:03:29 AM PST by .cnI redruM (Because change is not something you talk into existence.)
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To: Paradox

"First of all, I am a Rosa Parks fan because I believe she was fairly conservative, and she was a big fan of JC Watts."

While I do applaude the actions of Rosa Parks on that bus, I cringe when I think about her demands a couple years ago to be paid because someone used her name in a song. Come to think of it, it was probably her handlers demanding to be paid.


8 posted on 11/03/2005 8:05:38 AM PST by L98Fiero
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To: .cnI redruM

Today's Rosa Parks is the woman whose case leads ultimately to the reversal of Roe v. Wade.


9 posted on 11/03/2005 8:05:50 AM PST by Lexinom
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To: Paradox

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosa_Parks#Civil_rights_and_legal_context

My (white, military) family started to go into a restaurant, mid-`60s somewhere outside Montgomery, Alabama, and the old man saw the 'Members Only' sign on the door, so we went down the road. We did that a lot.
She was a brave woman. The NAACP needed someone to say 'No', and she did it. So you would think the Democrats could bury her with some dignity, let her rest in peace, but of course they turn her funeral into another `breast-beating' political propaganda session, though muted without the outrageous Wellman histrionics.

Over on DU the other day they were nearly swooning over how great it was to hear the "First Black President" again, how wonderful everything was back when he was in the Oval Office, and that President Bush and conservatives--and pretty much everything now--well, it just sucked you know?

I'll say this much: Rosa Parks deserved better company than the crowd of vampires that put her to rest the other day.


10 posted on 11/03/2005 8:21:05 AM PST by tumblindice
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To: .cnI redruM

Todays real civil rights movement is with conservatives who believe that all people should be treated equally and not judged or given preference (as is the case) based upon the color of their skin, gender or private sexual practices.

Conservatives are the true harbingers of equality, liberals are the purveyors of hate and division.


11 posted on 11/03/2005 8:25:06 AM PST by sasafras ("Licentiousness destroyes order, and when chaos ensues, the yearning for order will destroy freedom.)
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To: sasafras
And they have been since the 1930's when Democrats discovered that winning political coalitions could be constructed of 'building blocks' which consisted of different political interest groups. The interest groups routinely delivered their voters. This was the genesis of today's divisive, hatred-driven politics.
12 posted on 11/03/2005 8:27:09 AM PST by .cnI redruM (Because change is not something you talk into existence.)
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To: .cnI redruM
Parks had no idea that her refusal would become a standard...

Parks was an activist long before she was CHOSEN to make her stand on that bus. More power to her, but don't for a minute think that incident wasn't planned. I am glad it worked!

13 posted on 11/03/2005 8:36:04 AM PST by yoe
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To: .cnI redruM
I heard a clip of Clinton yesterday at her funeral call her Rosa PARK!!! Mabe he was thinking of Ft. Marcy PARK!! If Bush had screwed up her name it would be front page news for two days!!

Hey Hillbilly....her name was PARKS...not PARK...idiot.

14 posted on 11/03/2005 8:42:59 AM PST by Ann Archy (Abortion: The Human Sacrifice to the god of Convenience. T)
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To: yoe
Parks was an activist long before she was CHOSEN to make her stand on that bus. More power to her, but don't for a minute think that incident wasn't planned. I am glad it worked!

I heard that as well, but I haven't seen any evidence of it. It would not surprise me, however. Having said that, reading the accounts of how they treated blacks back then makes me shake my head in disbelief. I am glad that is all in the past.

15 posted on 11/03/2005 8:51:30 AM PST by Paradox (Just because we are not perfect, does not mean we are not good.)
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To: .cnI redruM

A few brave people changed the world.


16 posted on 11/03/2005 8:53:21 AM PST by marron
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To: Paradox
(try this for Rosa Parks)

As with many things, the good news rarely gets out, just the squeeky wheels get the attention - many Black Americans would live no other place than the south.

17 posted on 11/03/2005 9:36:10 AM PST by yoe
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To: Paradox
Having said that, I heard on a conservative talk station that the whole incident was something of a set-up. She worked for the NAACP and the plan was to have her refuse, then use this incident to sue the city.

That calls for even more courage, in my book. Apparently, many people were refusing to move as ordered. The NAACP chose hers as a test case because she was willing and able to fight it through to the end. That fight, and not her mere refusal to move, is what commands our respect.

18 posted on 11/03/2005 10:15:33 AM PST by Physicist
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To: Physicist
That fight, and not her mere refusal to move, is what commands our respect.

I completely agree. I just like to get the real facts straight.

19 posted on 11/03/2005 10:26:33 AM PST by Paradox (Just because we are not perfect, does not mean we are not good.)
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To: .cnI redruM
We can all sit here and say nice things, that's swell. But, I tell you, I've never seen or felt the hatred of racism so much, and so deeply, as I do these days.

Everyone of us is attracted to this forum because we are conservatives, and, most of us believe that the current state of our politics will be our undoing.

I see racism, and it's ancillary infections, as the number one problem in this Country. IMO, most of the reasons behind this racism stems from divisive political tactics.

Yeah, I agree, the Civil Rights movement ended with the death of MLK.

:O)

P
20 posted on 11/03/2005 11:44:32 AM PST by papasmurf (How can I be guilty of lying about a non-crime???)
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To: .cnI redruM

Today's "Rosa Parks" are those Black conservatives who stand for public office and persevere, despite being smeared by racist opponents. Such as Clarence Thomas, Condi Rice and Michael Steele.


21 posted on 11/03/2005 1:02:11 PM PST by silverleaf (Fasten your seat belts- it's going to be a BUMPY ride.)
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To: .cnI redruM
The hoopla around this woman's death certainly provokes some thoughts, most of which cannot be discussed here or anywhere in the midst of the syrupy celebrations of politically corrected history. So I won't.

Be that as it may, it is ironic and unacknowledged that the woman who defied, yes, defied, the establishment of the day is now celebrated by the very establishment! So perhaps a woman who defies the establishment of this day will be celebrated in 50 years as heroine? Who could that be? There are candidates out there, that you and I disapprove of today as we would have most likely disapproved of Rosa Parks had we been part of the white majority in the South of 1955. Something to ponder, while we congratulate ourselves for being so much more enlightened than every generation that preceeded us.

22 posted on 11/03/2005 1:12:23 PM PST by Revolting cat! ("In the end, nothing explains anything.")
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To: Paradox; Physicist
This is not the P.C. time to get the "facts straight". R. Parks AND her husband were NAACP reps and the "event" was well rehearsed. It was to be followed up with the Bus strike there which carried MLK to his leadership position, ending in the Memphis strike operations where he was slain and his "head held in Rev Jackson's arms".

I rode segregated buses to high school and three of us were thrown off the bus (rightfully) for sitting in the back of the bus in the colored section and refusing to give up our seats to coloured ladies who were maids going to work in the better neighborhoods.

When I say thrown, I mean thrown and no white person had any pity on us having to walk to school that day.

It was a different time and there was not the nastiness we have today.
23 posted on 11/07/2005 12:28:00 PM PST by Phosgood (Kerry was a Shill for Hillery)
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To: Phosgood
R. Parks AND her husband were NAACP reps and the "event" was well rehearsed.

I heard that on the radio, but I haven't seen it documented. I just want to know the truth about things, sick of the mythology that the Left creates about things. As I said, I am something of a fan of hers otherwise, and I realize that what she did still took courage, and that the right thing was eventually done. I just want to know the TRUTH.

24 posted on 11/07/2005 12:38:12 PM PST by Paradox (Just because we are not perfect, does not mean we are not good.)
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To: Phosgood
R. Parks AND her husband were NAACP reps and the "event" was well rehearsed.

Does that make a difference?

25 posted on 11/07/2005 12:49:57 PM PST by Physicist
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To: Physicist

""R. Parks AND her husband were NAACP reps and the "event" was well rehearsed.
Does that make a difference?""

If it is kept secret, it makes a difference to me. Does it make a difference whether you believe Rev Jackson held the dying MLK's head in his arms?


26 posted on 11/09/2005 1:35:00 PM PST by Phosgood (Kerry was a Shill for Hillery)
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To: Phosgood
Does it make a difference whether you believe Rev Jackson held the dying MLK's head in his arms?

It makes no difference whatsoever in my opinion of Dr. King. He fought for moral right, and was killed for it. (As for Jackson, I have no use for him either way, so no difference there, either.)

Likewise, Rosa Parks really did have her civil rights violated by an immoral law, and really did fight it through to the end to have it changed. And it really was changed, for everybody.

The fact that she knew in advance what she was about to suffer in no way cheapens or falsifies what she did. Jesus knew what he had coming, didn't he?

27 posted on 11/09/2005 2:02:03 PM PST by Physicist
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To: Physicist

You are following the moral side of this issue and I was addressing the "Truth" as raised by PARADOX.

You have feelings about why MLK was shot and I would like to know the Truth.


28 posted on 11/10/2005 2:26:20 PM PST by Phosgood (Kerry was a Shill for Hillery)
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