Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Bizarre Trip of a Lifetime ('extreme' American travlers go to N. Korea)
LA Times ^ | November 11, 2005 | By Bruce Wallace, Times Staff Writer

Posted on 11/10/2005 11:36:50 PM PST by Simmy2.5

PYONGYANG, North Korea — Monty Anderson got word that the trip was on two weeks after rushing home to California from Ukraine for emergency open-heart surgery. He didn't ask his doctor if it was OK to take another trip so soon. He told him he was going.

Eighty-year-old Joan Youmans heard about it when she picked up her phone messages after a trip to Indonesia. She canceled a few doctors' appointments and booked immediately.

When Joe Walker learned the trip was a go, he said he "just gave them my credit card number and told them to fill in the amount." Cost him seven grand, he figures.

Such is the allure of North Korea to the "extreme traveler."

Opportunities for American tourists to visit the secretive state that makes no secret of its loathing for the U.S. are mighty tough to come by. A North Korean visa for an American is like round-the-clock electricity here in the North Korean capital: not impossible, but rare enough to be appreciated when it unexpectedly arrives.

(Excerpt) Read more at latimes.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS: idiots; northkorea; socialistparadise
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-69 next last
Only Youmans appeared unperturbed by the relentless propaganda. North Korean officials called her "Grandma," and when the group was told to line up by age to walk to the edge of the DMZ, she was at the head of the line. Youmans found the North Korean attitude at the border to be fairly casual and said she loved the "orderliness" of Pyongyang. People were "well dressed and healthy," she said, adding that she believed North Korea could become a "real power one day."

Uhhh...yeah. Real power one day. Uh huh.

Anyways, just want I want to do! Getting my thrills...by visiting a whack socialist cesspool!

1 posted on 11/10/2005 11:36:51 PM PST by Simmy2.5
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5
"Eighty-year-old Joan Youmans"

Senility kills.

2 posted on 11/10/2005 11:40:29 PM PST by fieldmarshaldj (*Fightin' the system like a $2 hooker on crack*)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5
she loved the "orderliness" of Pyongyang. People were "well dressed and healthy," she said, adding that she believed North Korea could become a "real power one day.

Wow - this one really has drunk deep of the Kool-Aid. I wonder if she ever asked herself why it was necessary to have government minders at her side at all times...
3 posted on 11/10/2005 11:42:23 PM PST by notfornothing
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: notfornothing

bttt


4 posted on 11/10/2005 11:42:36 PM PST by ConservativeMan55 (DON'T FIRE UNTIL YOU SEE THE WHITES OF THE CURTAINS THEY ARE WEARING ON THEIR HEADS !)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5

Bizarre trip of a lifetime?!

Heck, just visit Michael Jackson at his Neverland Ranch.


5 posted on 11/10/2005 11:43:17 PM PST by This Just In ("Those are my principles, if you don't like them, I've got others" - Groucho Marx)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5
"Totalitarian governments take care of you," said Altaffer"

And how !

6 posted on 11/10/2005 11:44:55 PM PST by fieldmarshaldj (*Fightin' the system like a $2 hooker on crack*)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5

Here is an interesting website about a trip to North Korea. There is several websites on the web similar to this one. I think it is sad what the people of North Korea have to go trough because of their government. I really hope it becomes a free nation sometime in my lifetime.

http://weecheng.com/asia/dprk/index2.htm


7 posted on 11/10/2005 11:50:19 PM PST by rwh
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5; Admin Moderator; All

Opps! Forgot an e in 'travelers'.

Anyways, if you check out LA Times homepage, the link to this article (which is the BIG article on the homepage. Well, okay, not 'big' maybe, but it does have a picture of the idiots...I mean tourist), the link to this article are "Wish You Were Here" and "N. Korea: It's Their Dream Destination". Yes! I'm sure the LA Times staff wish they were in North Korea!


8 posted on 11/10/2005 11:50:26 PM PST by Simmy2.5 (There are more conspiracies at DU then there are on Coast to Coast AM.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5

there was a call to boortz one day this last week from some kid who was headed to N. Korea...

What a pathetic dupe.


9 posted on 11/10/2005 11:59:06 PM PST by wigswest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TigerLikesRooster; AmericanInTokyo
탁 (ping?)
10 posted on 11/11/2005 12:03:31 AM PST by martin_fierro (Able to communicate telepathically with sea creatures)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro; TigerLikesRooster; AmericanInTokyo; Simmy2.5; lizol; Atlantic Bridge; NYer; ...

Of those I know, there are 3 types of Americans that have visited North Korea: Spec ops guys who won't talk about what is national security, Hollywood previleged that tout NK as paradise on earth, and merchant mariners who deliver US food aid to the starving N. Koreans.

All of the mariners I've met who visited NK, NONE would ever return...except one who is a born again Christian.

There are interesting and horrifying things about this small and peculiar country: dock strikes and labor violence, rampant homosexuality, family blood feuds, and the obvious corruption for survival. I suppose that North Korea is the worst it can get for humanity. I've met quite a few folk from former communist nations. None of their experiences matched (not even the worst cases for Romania). The short book "Aquariums of Pyongyang" is a real eye-opener and I highly recommend it.

I've searched for this article and was able to find it after a good hunt:




North Korea
By Christopher Gasiorek '95
(Third Mate, M/V JUDY LITRICO, May-July 1997)

Where to begin? There is no other place like this on earth. We arrive in fog and wonder whether it’s a Government Plot so we don’t see anything. As we approach the country, still about 6 miles away, the navy questions us. Harbor pilots do not understand why we cannot approach through the channel in the fog and continually want our ETA even though we’re just waiting until the fog clears.

After we anchor at the foreign vessel waiting area #1 we are instructed to wait until the next morning for the pilot to board. I took a few pictures of land so I would have at least a hazy picture of North Korea from a distance. The next morning comes the small tugboat, the engine of which sounds as if were running on three of eight cylinders. Two pilots, two army immigration officers, and a quarantine officer board the vessel, all wearing uniforms or some shade of off-green. Standard issue Kim Il Sung pins on every chest. We exchange initial formalities. The immigration officials and the quarantine officer set up to check crewmembers against their passports. Included in this process is taking everyone’s pulse--I understand that it is illegal to enter the country if you are dead. The immigration officers declare that they must secure the depth sounder and all long-range radio equipment, as well as locking up all cameras and binoculars. Once all this is accomplished we are ready to enter the port, but not until the North Koreans have their fill of lunch, soda, and cigarettes. Our limited chatter with them includes their ensuring that all Americans live in fear of North Korean missiles.

The port of Nampo is about 12 miles up the Taedong River, which has a huge dam built across it to prevent the tide from affecting the port. The vessel enters a lock to go from the sea to the river. The pilot informs us that the tower in the middle of the lock is where Jimmy and Rosalyn Carter danced during their visit to the country. A huge monument to the army workers who built the dam sits next to it. All is constructed of low-tech concrete and the ten-year-old dam and locks are crumbling, but Nampo doesn’t look too bad from afar. We are shoehorned in behind an idle North Korean freighter. Several pieces of the dock crumble into the harbor when I heave up the stern lines.

After our vessel is all secure we undergo the search. I accompany three North Korean officers to inspect the house and crew quarters, a two-hour process. All rooms and spaces are thoroughly included--insides of books, entire content of wallets, and anywhere else imaginable. The inspectors are most interested in how much money each crewmember has. The chief engineer has $125 more than he declared and is forced to turn it over to the authorities.

Three cranes do unloading with buckets into three bagging units. From the bagging units the cargo is turned over to the Koreans for transportation to the famine-stricken areas. This transport includes trucks (ancient Chinese and Russian things that must often be push or tow-started), barges, trains, buses, and even tank train cars, which are loaded one bag at a time through the small loading hatches on top. Trains are pulled by coal- and wood-fired locomotives. Approximately fifty workers man the dock at all times. Brainwashed is not a strong enough word to describe them. The high officials and ship agents have some rather warped idea of the outside world, but the rest of the people seem to have no knowledge at all. The exceptions to this are: South Korea (the enemy) and the United States (of which they know nothing other than that we are also the enemy). The unfounded hate in these people’s eyes amazes me. From the bridge it is at all times possible to observe at least four military guards with machine guns, including young women with machine guns nearly as long as they are tall (including the attached bayonets).

I have just realized that in every other country in the world you see people reading the newspaper. The reason this stuck me is that I have yet to see a newspaper, let alone someone reading one. All of the mid-level and above officials, as well as all military personnel, wear a pin on their breast with a picture of the Great Leader centered on a red flag. In the Soviet Union pins such as these, featuring Lenin, were everywhere and were given to us freely. When we asked whether we might be able to get some of these Kim Il Sung pins we were initially given hostile looks. It was later established that only people who have the Great Leader "strongly in their heart" may have these pins--these people actually believe this stuff. Richard, an AB, saw a fight between two truck drivers that was explained away as great socialist workers teaming together to make the Great Leader happy.

The barges that are loaded have families living aboard them. The water that we are in is fresh, although not particularly clean. Still, I’ve observed cooking water being taken from one end of a barge while a man urinates from the other. The North Korean ship moored ahead of us departed, hitting our bow on the way out. No damage other than some scraped paint. Earlier in the day we were told that we would have to shift aft one hundred feet, but this request quietly went away after the collision.

It is interesting that in the port area where we were allowed to go freely there were no obvious signs of starvation. On several occasions I observed young boys stealing corn from the warehouse where our cargo was being stored. They did it as a group and were chased, and, when caught, beaten by the numerous guards. Fortunately none of the multitudes of machine guns were used.

A few notes on politics: The North Koreans would prefer to handle our corn in bulk. The U.S. government, however, wanted the cargo put into bags, bags they have the large letters u.s.a. written on them. When the North Koreans saw the bags they refused to accept them. Hearing this, the U.S. government said it would not give the food without the bags. The North Koreans relented and accepted the bags; I can see the people who receive the cargo having it explained to them that the food was intended to go as aid from North Korea to the United States to help the starving Americans. We had been scheduled to discharge at a second port, Chongjin, on the eastern side of the Korean peninsula. We were to take a very small amount of cargo there, from only our government. Because we were to "show the flag," however, this has now been changed. A North Korean ship will take the cargo for Chongjin.

In talking with a Washington Post journalist who is on assignment with the World Food Program I was able to learn a bit about the conditions outside the city. (We are not able to see any sign of famine in the immediate area, the 4 acres our travel is limited to. Whether this is by design, so that we do not see, or if conditions here are better than elsewhere, is impossible to know.) The journalist had traveled—travel that was by no means free—to areas that had been prepared for her arrival, but she still told stories of schoolchildren dying at their desks.

We are granted the opportunity to tour Pyongyang, the capital, with our agents for about $50. Imagine being shown all of the monuments in Washington, D.C., on a private tour with no one else there. Imagine visiting the Washington Monument (they have something very similar) on any day of the year and not seeing a single other person. The official explanation for this was that all the people have jobs at which they were working. That’s commonly heard in Russia, too, but Red Square is never empty. We were allowed to take only one camera for our group of six people. (We soon learned that if we wanted to take ten cameras to anything, we must ask permission, in writing, to take twenty.)

The drive to Pyongyang from Nampo initially transited the port and then the town of Nampo itself. My initial impression was that the architecture was very similar to that in Russia—Early Stalinist Revival might be a good description. But the quality here was worse. At least in the Russian capital and in many other cities the Soviet-style architecture was interspersed with the existing buildings, except in the case of collective farms and such. Here I see no "existing buildings." General living conditions appear to be quite horrid. From what it was possible to tell from a moving van, the apartments were considerably smaller and in much worse shape than their Russian counterparts, and the North Koreans would not have allowed us to drive by anything of which they were not proud. It was clear that there was much that they were not proud of that we were not to see. Also along the 37-mile drive into the capital we passed several large industrial complexes, possibly steel mills and large manufacturing sites. They were all closed down and appeared to have been so for a while. It could have been their "rust belt" for all I know--they wouldn’t tell us much--but it didn’t look like the country was producing anything. The only export that I saw was that of zinc ingots. This is interesting as it is what Cargill had hoped to trade for grain.

The roads are huge. Nearly all main roads are at least four lanes. They have interchanges with on-ramps, exits, and so on, but very few cars. We passed many of the trucks that we had loaded parked on the side of the road, broken down. We also saw quite a bit of military traffic, and I’d estimate that about half of the men we saw in the capital are in one uniform or another.

The first site we are taken to is the Great Leader’s birthplace. As our guides told us, we were among very few Americans to have ever been there. The Great Leader’s birthplace has been preserved in its "original state"; whether this included the thirty or so North Koreans scrubbing the granite walkway by hand was not entirely clear. From the looks of the workers, we were more on display than the birthplace of their Great Leader. The kimono-clad women who gave us a history of the leader’s family were pleasant and informative. One described several times "the ruthless occupation by the Japs," very harsh feelings for a country that now appears to be one of North Korea’s largest trading partners (our tour van was a Nissan). This feeling would show continually throughout the day. The Great Leader’s birthplace is in a park that is kept up and very pretty. It also includes a small, deserted amusement park with two halfway decent-looking roller coasters that are a bit worse for the wear. In response to our question of when the amusement park is open, we were told "everyday." I would guess it hadn’t been open for a while.

Next was a tour through the sporting area. Here there was a giant building for each of many sports, including swimming, tae kwon do, ping pong, bowling (huh?), soccer, and others. All of them are empty--no people, no cars. Again, everyone was at work.

We then went to pay our respects to the Great Leader at a huge monument on a hill overlooking the capital. The monument itself is a multistory bronze statue of Kim Il Sung, arm raised, with a wall of huge soldiers in battle on either side of him. Loud patriotic music played from large speakers behind the statue. We were instructed to stand in a line as our chief mate, Dave, laid flowers before the statue. There were other people here, and just before Dave laid the flowers an announcement in Korean came over the loudspeaker that seemed to announce our presence to the other visitors, making us a great propaganda tool. This was not the first time we were so used.

Having paid our respects to the Great Leader we were taken to a store in order to fill the Great Leader’s pockets with foreign currency. The store was similar to a Russian beriozka. Only foreign currency or Korean blue currency could be used. (Regular Korean currency is brown but foreigners cannot use this, and Koreans can not use the blue.) The guides worked their way around answering the question of who was allowed to shop in the store, which was about the size of a large drug store and had a stock including radios, TVs, liquor, clothing, souvenirs, and a motorcycle. We also went to a four-story "department store" with a similar but more spread out inventory.

Lunch was in the basement of a hotel restaurant. It was an indoor barbecue. Each table was the size of a normal booth but with a gas grill inset into the middle. We were given marinated beef, squid, and cucumbers that were slightly spicy. When barbecued and served with large quantities of Chinese beer it made a very good lunch.

After lunch we went to a 170-meter-tall monument presented to the Great Leader for his seventieth birthday. Again we were the only people present. The monument was impeccably clean and well constructed, in contrast to non-memorial buildings. Throughout the city are many smaller reminders of the greatness of the Great Leader. It seems impossible to not be within sight of his picture. Looming over the Pyongyang skyline is a 105-story hotel under construction. It is pyramid-shaped and is visible from almost everywhere in the city. While riding around town we once got within about 200 yards of the monstrosity. It was in terrible shape, with the prefab concrete at the bottom crumbling. It is my impression that construction has stopped and that the building’s structural integrity is in question, but this was not mentioned on our tour and our guides would say nothing about it.

We then went for a ride on the Pyongyang subway. Judging by their reactions, very few of the people we encountered on the subway had ever seen a foreigner. The subway was in very good condition and ranks among the nicest I have seen. It was very deep, seemingly built to the same specs as those in Moscow and St. Petersburg. Our guides denied it but there were the telltale huge doors at the bottom of the escalators to seal the system as a nuclear shelter. The walls were covered with every sort of socialist art, all of very high quality.

We were then taken to another store followed by dinner and drinks at a Tavern on the Green–like restaurant located on a pond in a park. It was quite drab inside, however. We had a few more beers and Korean spicy noodle soup that was very good. We had a good talk with our agents over this meal, and I thought that we had made some progress toward understanding each other’s ideas. Unfortunately, a few days later, this turned out to not be the case. We then made our way back to the ship with a short break on the highway for a rest stop and a beautiful double rainbow.

We were in North Korea for the third anniversary of Kim Il Sung’s death. (That’s correct: the revered Great Leader has been dead and not officially replaced for some time.) We were initially invited to a memorial ceremony for foreigners to be held one day before the anniversary. At first we were just asked to attend, but later our invitation was extended to include a special dinner after the ceremony. I was anxious to go even though it was only about 5 minutes from the ship, still further than our usual limits. About two days prior to the event we were told that we were expected to give a short speech. Dave wrote a very short speech saying that we understand the grief that the Korean people must have. The next day the agents returned, said that the speech was unacceptable, and gave us another to read; they also wanted us to sign it. It was a page-long speech that basically said that Kim Il Sung was the greatest leader that the world has ever known and how we Americans believe this and wish Korea to be united under the rule of the North. We refused to read this or sign it, and our invitation to attend the ceremony was rescinded. The statue of the Great Leader at which the ceremonies for foreigners and for Koreans were to be held was very close to the ship.

Early in the morning of the anniversary loud patriotic music began to play over the whole city. On the various tugboats and North Korean vessels in the harbor we could see people getting ready for the ceremony. This included bathing in the harbor. Bathing in general seemed to be done only on special occasions. From the flying bridge of the ship I could see the statue and the square around it. Unfortunately our binoculars had been locked up. I could see columns of people dressed in dark pants, white shirts, and dark ties marching toward the statue from different parts of the city. All marching, like some great army. I would guess that there were 25–30,000 people in the square with the statue. This would constitute nearly every one in the whole city. All work in the harbor had stopped. The ceremony went from 6 am to 11 am. We were required to sound the ship’s whistle for three minutes to commemorate the three years since the death of the Great Leader.

The long trip home let much of this culture sink in. A lot of the things that we saw did not register in our heads, but through conversations on the way home they slowly came out. What everyone in the crew agreed upon was that this was by far the most foreign place that they had ever been to, and that North Korea does pose a threat to world security---the leaders of this country are strongly determined to keep their country the way it is, and more miraculously, the people are enthusiastic to follow. I can compare it only to Russia, which I visited before the collapse of the Soviet Union. The difference being the people. In the USSR the people were aware of outside events, and their part in them. The North Koreans are so brainwashed as to believe that they are the luckiest people in the world.


11 posted on 11/11/2005 1:09:10 AM PST by SaltyJoe (A mother's sorrowful heart and personal sacrifice redeems her lost child's soul.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5

,,, wherever you go... there you are! Extweem.

12 posted on 11/11/2005 1:16:23 AM PST by shaggy eel
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SaltyJoe

A most interesting reading. However, I cannot see the connection between the absurdity of North Korean ways and its threat to the world security. Will you elaborate?


13 posted on 11/11/2005 2:06:59 AM PST by A Russian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: A Russian

They're crazy, rooskie.


14 posted on 11/11/2005 2:13:01 AM PST by HiTech RedNeck
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: rwh
Here is an interesting website about a trip to North Korea.

OMG. Those photos were kind of disturbing. It's not the people. It's the land. Everything outside of a farm collective is dead and brown.

It reminds me of the empty, haunted environment in that Half-Life 2 game. You're driving instinct is to escape.

15 posted on 11/11/2005 2:22:24 AM PST by Caipirabob (Democrats.. Socialists..Commies..Traitors...Who can tell the difference?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5
Real power one day

The North Koreans would probably settle for electrical for a complete day

16 posted on 11/11/2005 2:31:15 AM PST by philo (They couldn't hit an elephant at this dist. . . . Union General John Sedgwick last words)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: philo
Real power one day

The North Koreans would probably settle for electrical power for a complete day

17 posted on 11/11/2005 2:34:02 AM PST by philo (They couldn't hit an elephant at this dist. . . . Union General John Sedgwick last words)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5
I'm sure the LA Times staff wish they were in North Korea!

Until the day comes when "progressives" at the LA Times,NY Times,Boston Globe,etc,get to take their dream vacation,they can always do the next best thing.

Visit Compton!

18 posted on 11/11/2005 3:07:49 AM PST by Gay State Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5
Whoa, dude! Kewl! North Korea: like, totally awesome!

Okay I'm going to date myself here but let me just say: gag me with a spoon. LOL

Seriously, though, someone posted a picture of NK soldiers recently--something about their rice hats (?)--and the soldiers (presumably given the best food, medical care, etc.) were very thin, skin and bones.

There are reports of cannibalism in NK. "Special meat"--that's what they call it. I'll find a link.

19 posted on 11/11/2005 3:15:17 AM PST by proud American in Canada
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: A Russian
I cannot see the connection between the absurdity of North Korean ways and its threat to the world security

Okay, I'm not an expert on this, but at the same time they're making nuclear weapons, they are so hungry that they are eating their own children:

Here's a 2003 Telegraph article about the cannibalism

There is something seriously wrong in North Korea.

20 posted on 11/11/2005 3:28:32 AM PST by proud American in Canada
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: rwh

http://www.simonbone.com/myohyang.html

that guy's stories are nice as well. Interesting stuff. I'd kinda like to visit it, just to see how freaky it really is.


21 posted on 11/11/2005 3:31:06 AM PST by Lauretij2
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: HiTech RedNeck
They're crazy, rooskie.

Exactly.

Desperation + nuclear weapons = not good.

22 posted on 11/11/2005 3:31:17 AM PST by proud American in Canada
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: SaltyJoe

-bump-
to an outstanding find and post

23 posted on 11/11/2005 3:33:49 AM PST by Cboldt
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: martin_fierro
Re #10 Thanks for your Korean-style ping! :)
24 posted on 11/11/2005 3:38:15 AM PST by TigerLikesRooster
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: A Russian
The depraved morals of one man makes him a threat to surrounding people. He lacks compunction to stop his own restless desires and seeks to dominate the will of those around him. It's a criminal intelligence that drives his motives to satiate his ever-changing lusts and greed.

When a society falls victim to such a state, their entire populace "lives" (if you can call it living) to serve the whims of one untamed radical. Russians suffered under just such a fate because of two neurotic tyrants. One was external (Adolf Hitler), and the other internal (Stalin). Nations and ideologs were tragically under the spell of these wicked men and such characters were indeed a threat to the entire world. Though hardly the scale of Nazi German or Stalinist Soviet Union, modern weaponry makes the North Korean Regime a determined enemy of the global community. If the DPRK isn't pushing illegal weapons, they're smuggling drugs, or pimping some other petty crime for quick cash and strategic advantage.
25 posted on 11/11/2005 4:07:16 AM PST by SaltyJoe (A mother's sorrowful heart and personal sacrifice redeems her lost child's soul.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: proud American in Canada

> They're crazy, rooskie.
I know that, pindos, they are crazy and hungry.
It's not an easy thing to make a nuclear bomb, especially if you haven't got food. Or were the Rosenbergs gassed for nothing? :)

And again a MDW scare.

(Sigh)


26 posted on 11/12/2005 1:22:08 AM PST by A Russian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: A Russian

Sorry, electrocuted. :)


27 posted on 11/12/2005 1:23:30 AM PST by A Russian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: A Russian

So you're saying that terrorists attack people in the name of All-ha because they're hungry?

Now that is just intellectually dishonest.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1520691/posts
"Contrary to ongoing reports by mainstream media outlets, WMDs have been found in Iraq, so reports New York Times best-selling author Richard Miniter in his new book, Disinformation.

Consider these shocking facts:

• Found: 1.77 metric tons of enriched uranium

• Found: 1,500 gallons of chemical weapons

• Found: Roadside bomb loaded with sarin gas

• Found: 1,000 radioactive materials--ideal for radioactive dirty bombs

• Found: 17 chemical warheads--some containing cyclosarin, a nerve agent five times more powerful than sarin "



”In March, 2003, when U.S. tanks rolled into Iraq, 500 tons of yellow cake uranium was found at the Iraqi nuclear research center of al-Tuwaitha. This included 1.8 tons of partly enriched uranium. On June 23, 2004, the U.S. military, working with the U.S. Department of Energy removed this material to the US where is held at an unnamed Department of Energy facility."
http://www.hawaiireporter.com/story.aspx?a8dda1f1-9129-4329-a588-b566a2882f8a

500 tons of uranium in Iraqq, got that?


28 posted on 11/12/2005 8:03:52 PM PST by Darksheare (I'm not suspicious & I hope it's nutritious but I think this sandwich is made of mime.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Darksheare

> So you're saying that terrorists attack people in the
> name of All-ha because they're hungry?
I am not. I am saying that North Korea lacks the resources needed to make a nuclear bomb.
As to other illegal activities like petty crime -- nobody, even the USA, is innocent. E.g., the close relationship between CIA and drugdealers is not a secret.

Concerning the list of materials you posted: I will google later. Perhaps there is another version of this story.


29 posted on 11/13/2005 11:44:44 PM PST by A Russian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: Darksheare

> • Found: 1.77 metric tons of enriched uranium
> ...
> 500 tons of yellow cake uranium
In fact, 500 metric tonnes of UNenriched uranium and 1.8 tonnes of purified (that is, NOT enriched) uranium dioxide AKA yellowcake.
Unenriched uranium is used to make armour and armour-piercers.
On what yellowcake is, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellowcake. Nothing rare or suitable for a nuclear bomb.

> was found
It wasn't found because it wasn't hidden. In fact, the uranium was feared stolen after American invasion and resulting looting, but later found (most of it).
It was lying there since 1992, sealed by IAEA.
Source: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3009082.stm.

So much for now. I'll search for other fakes later.
Although "Roadside bomb loaded with sarin gas" and "1,000 radioactive materials" already sound stupid.


30 posted on 11/14/2005 1:11:56 AM PST by A Russian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: A Russian

LOL, you think it was faked?
You are an idiot.


31 posted on 11/14/2005 8:46:39 AM PST by Darksheare (I'm not suspicious & I hope it's nutritious but I think this sandwich is made of mime.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: A Russian

"In fact, the uranium was feared stolen after American invasion and resulting looting, but later found (most of it).
It was lying there since 1992, sealed by IAEA"

Oh, but Hans Blix stated that there wasn't any in Iraq at all.
Now which is it?


32 posted on 11/14/2005 8:48:17 AM PST by Darksheare (I'm not suspicious & I hope it's nutritious but I think this sandwich is made of mime.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: A Russian

Yes, you did say that terrorists attack people because they're hungry.
"It's not an easy thing to make a nuclear bomb, especially if you haven't got food." -post 26

You are a liar.


33 posted on 11/14/2005 8:51:56 AM PST by Darksheare (I'm not suspicious & I hope it's nutritious but I think this sandwich is made of mime.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: A Russian

"Although "Roadside bomb loaded with sarin gas".."

And you would be an idiot.
Been waiting for you to troll your way back here.
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1159525/posts
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1144627/posts

" The "mainstream" media has been tiptoeing around the discovery of a 155-mm mortar shell containing Sarin gas in Iraq, the contents of which have been confirmed. The shell was used as part of an improvised explosive device (IED) on a road near the Baghdad International Airport, and exploded as it was being disarmed.

The shell contained three liters of Sarin -- nearly a gallon. It was a type of shell designed to mix chemical components during flight, which was why the explosion didn't kill anyone (though two soldiers were treated for exposure). Three liters of Sarin is enough, if the components are mixed properly, to realistically kill hundreds, and potentially thousands. A concentration of 100 milligrams of Sarin per cubic meter of air is enough to constitute a lethal dose for half the people breathing it within one minute."

Get lost troll, don't come back.


34 posted on 11/17/2005 9:12:34 AM PST by Darksheare (I'm not suspicious & I hope it's nutritious but I think this sandwich is made of mime.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: A Russian; Darksheare

I see that Dark has a new friend.

Play nice, my dear amusing friend. Call me for the clean-up....


;-)


35 posted on 11/18/2005 3:40:53 AM PST by Dashing Dasher (My honor student beat up France.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: SaltyJoe

bookmark


36 posted on 11/18/2005 3:46:28 AM PST by Sam's Army (Intense and spicy, with a hint of sarcasm and a dry finish.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5

From post #26..."I know that, pindos"

"pindos" looks suspiciously similar to a Lithuanian word.

The word? My wife has one and I don't. Sounds like an insult to me.


37 posted on 11/19/2005 2:21:44 PM PST by toddlintown (Lennon takes six bullets to the chest, Yoko is standing right next to him and not one f'ing bullet?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #38 Removed by Moderator

To: toddlintown

'Pindos' is a slang term for American, just as 'Rusky' for Russian; insulting to the same degree. It ultimately origins from the name of mountain system in Greece.


39 posted on 01/09/2006 11:29:40 PM PST by A Russian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: Darksheare

OK, orc, I'm back.

Well, if there was a roadside bomb filled with poisonous gas, it was stupid of the guerrillas to plant it. They could have killed several soldiers with good old explosive. But they preferred to make three of them sick. Inefficient.
Well, it was Iraqis' stupidity, not the journalist's.
I don't understand, though, what it has got to do with Saddam. The gas was obviously smuggled into the country or made there after the Americans overthrew Hussein and turned Iraq into a lair of terrorists.

'1,000 radioactive materials' (sorts? tons?) still remains a meaningless stupidity.


40 posted on 01/09/2006 11:38:49 PM PST by A Russian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Darksheare

> Yes, you did say that terrorists attack people because they're hungry.
> "It's not an easy thing to make a nuclear bomb, especially if you haven't got food." -post 26

> You are a liar.
No, you are dyslexic. Suicide bombing and making a nuclear bomb are entirely different things, requiring different staff. Suicide bombers should be hungry, but scientists and engineers should be well-fed and supplied.
If you think that a nuclear bomb can be made in a garage, you are braiwashed by Hollywood beyond belief.


41 posted on 01/09/2006 11:45:24 PM PST by A Russian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: This Just In

"Bizarre trip of a lifetime?!

Heck, just visit Michael Jackson at his Neverland Ranch."

I heard that the vacation includes a day trip to the Chosin Resevoir where you get to go toe to toe with 10,000 NK ninjas.

There's a free buffet and open bar at noon.


42 posted on 01/09/2006 11:48:00 PM PST by beaver fever
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Simmy2.5
American leftists travel to North Korea and dig it....
Big F'n Deal--Dog Bites Man.

The first stop on the tour, for example, was the towering statue of Kim that overlooks this city. Every visitor was lined up at the base and was expected to bow in homage. All five Americans bowed.

You swine. You filthy leftist swine.

I'll tell you one place you will never visit: my house.

I've been in North Korea--from our side of the DMZ--y'all ain't nuthin' but a silhouette in a night vision scope on a sniper rifle on a cold night high a top a hill in the Chorwon Valley.

43 posted on 01/09/2006 11:54:53 PM PST by Cogadh na Sith (There's an open road from the cradle to the tomb.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Darksheare

I'm not Blix's lawyer.


44 posted on 01/09/2006 11:57:35 PM PST by A Russian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: fieldmarshaldj

Yeah, what'/s the deal with two of the three quoted being either elderly or just out of the hospital from major surgery--is this a whole new class of tourist? Still, I wouldn'/t hesitate to go if the opportunity presented itself---but they would have to pay ME 7 thousand dollars.


45 posted on 01/10/2006 12:02:23 AM PST by willyboyishere ("When the superficial wearies me, it wearies me so much that I need an abyss in order to rest")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: SaltyJoe

Wow, Salty, thanks for posting that lengthy narrative on the sailor's direct exposure to North Korea , ( discussion of which , by the way, seems to have "peaked" some time ago in the US). We could use more first-person accounts like that===and thanks for mentioning the "Aquariums of Pyongyang" book---I have been meaning to get ahold of that , and now will.


46 posted on 01/10/2006 12:13:25 AM PST by willyboyishere ("When the superficial wearies me, it wearies me so much that I need an abyss in order to rest")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: A Russian
OK:

They can only survive by blaming their failure on someone else. There is no upper limit to the amount of people they would kill to show they are right--

even if they are wrong....

You should be familiar with this idea if you are a Russian?

47 posted on 01/10/2006 12:33:43 AM PST by Cogadh na Sith (There's an open road from the cradle to the tomb.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Cogadh na Sith

> They can only survive by blaming their failure on
> someone else. There is no upper limit to the amount of
> people they would kill to show they are right--
> even if they are wrong....
The same applies to your people in Viet Nam or Iraq... There are always some bad guys: Nazis, or Communists, or Islamic Terrorists...
The communists have already given up, while you haven't.

> You should be familiar with this idea if you are a Russian?
As I have already said, the communists have given up.


48 posted on 01/10/2006 3:34:46 AM PST by A Russian
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: Cogadh na Sith

"I've been in North Korea--from our side of the DMZ--y'all ain't nuthin' but a silhouette in a night vision scope on a sniper rifle on a cold night high a top a hill in the Chorwon Valley."

Now THAT's what I'm talking about!


49 posted on 01/10/2006 4:30:31 AM PST by toddlintown (Lennon takes six bullets to the chest, Yoko is standing right next to him and not one f'ing bullet?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: A Russian; MikeinIraq; darkwing104

Hey guys, checkout the funny troll.
(Check his post history too!)


50 posted on 01/10/2006 7:05:30 PM PST by Darksheare (Beware the waddling Penguin Invaders from Ursa Minor!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-69 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson