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Support for Category 5 Storm Protection in New Orleans Ebbs in D.C. (Hillary still confused)
Newhouse News ^ | 11/11/05 | BILL WALSH, BRUCE ALPERT

Posted on 11/12/2005 7:01:26 AM PST by Libloather

Support for Category 5 Storm Protection in New Orleans Ebbs in D.C.
BY BILL WALSH And BRUCE ALPERT
Newhouse News Service


Louisiana Governor Kathleen Blanco speaks at a Rebuilding and Recovery Conference in New Orleans, La., Thursday, Nov. 10, 2005. Blanco talked about the effects of Hurricane Katrina and how the state would have to rebuild. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

WASHINGTON -- In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the tattered Gulf Coast received an outpouring of sympathy -- and money -- from Washington. Congress appropriated $62 billion for relief and recovery, and President Bush vowed to rebuild New Orleans "higher and better."

But 21/2 months after the storm, such unequivocal support is hard to come by in the nation's capital.

When, for example, Louisiana's political leaders show rare unity in asking Washington for assurances that a rebuilt New Orleans will be protected from Category 5 hurricanes, they often are met with skepticism, ignorance and outright hostility.

Protection from the strongest hurricanes, state and local officials say, is essential to giving residents and businesses the confidence they need to return and rebuild.

But Rep. Jerry Lewis, R-Calif., chairman of the House Appropriations Committee overseeing federal spending, said he wasn't aware until Wednesday that Louisiana officials saw Category 5 protection as the key to redevelopment. The top-ranking Democrat on the panel, Rep. David Obey of Wisconsin, said he wants proof that it will work. Senate Appropriations Committee member Conrad Burns, R-Mont., said that in his view, New Orleans could get by just fine with Category 3 protection for the time being.

"I think over time we should keep reinforcing it and eventually get to a Category 5," Burns said. "That way we can spread the cost out over time."

And in contrast to the clear commitment Bush gave in a speech in New Orleans' Jackson Square on Sept. 15 to "do what it takes ... stay as long as it takes" to restore the city, he now appears reluctant to signal his support for protection from hurricanes stronger than Katrina and Rita.

At a brief photo opportunity at the White House on Thursday, Bush repeated his commitment to rebuilding the Gulf Coast. But when asked if he supported Category 5 hurricane protection, he declined to answer.

The ambiguous wording is beginning to worry members of Louisiana's congressional delegation who have been struggling to keep Washington's focus on rebuilding the state even as other news -- a Supreme Court nomination, the White House leak scandal and congressional criminal investigations -- compete for attention.

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., is preparing a letter that she hopes Senate colleagues will sign that expresses their commitment to rebuilding the hurricane-ravaged Gulf Coast. Sen. David Vitter, R-La., said colleagues think he is looking for a blank check rather than merely a show of support.

"I think they are confusing, quite frankly, some sort of full authorization with that initial statement," Vitter said. "I'm trying to educate them that I'm not avoiding the normal stages of the process and just want a general, solid statement that leaves plenty of room for questions to be answered."

The 200-mile levee system snaking through metropolitan New Orleans was supposed to be able to withstand a direct hit from a Category 3 hurricane, which can pack winds of up to 130 mph and a 12-foot storm surge. But breaches in the levees that flooded much of the city during Katrina, a Category 3 storm, have raised questions about design and construction flaws.

The Army Corps of Engineers, which designed the levee system, has estimated that reinforcing them to withstand a Category 5 hurricane, with winds greater than 155 mph and an 18-foot storm surge, could cost about $3.5 billion. Extending that level of protection 72 miles south to the Gulf of Mexico would send the price up to $18 billion, according to the Louisiana governor's office.

But cost is not the only thing generating questions on Capitol Hill, according to interviews with more than two dozen lawmakers this week. Some members of Congress want assurances that the Corps is capable of building hurricane protection that can withstand a Category 5 storm.

"I want the science to be there," Obey said. "I don't want to approve something without knowing it will work. Otherwise we're just throwing (money) down a rat hole."

Others want some sign from state and local officials that enhanced levees will be part of a well-thought-out reconstruction plan.

"I think there needs to be a redevelopment plan that we can look to and understand what the scope and extent is," said Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska. "That's when you will get buy-in from Congress."

Numerous commissions and planning authorities have cropped up in the wake of the storm, but there has been little consensus on how to proceed. There are disagreements about what areas should be rebuilt and how, what new building and zoning standards will say, what kind of hurricane protection is most appropriate, what should be protected and what shouldn't.

Even an enthusiastic supporter of rebuilding, Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y., said she was confused about who is calling the shots.

"Someone has to be in charge, and I don't know who that is," she said at a hearing on hurricane protection Wednesday. "At what point does the rubber hit the road and someone says, `This is what we are going to do?"'

Montana's Burns said he doesn't agree that a congressional promise to build a hurricane-proof city is the key to repopulating the New Orleans region, as Mayor Ray Nagin and Gov. Kathleen Blanco have said.

"That's their opinion," he said.

Lewis, the House Appropriations Committee chairman, said he first learned at a hearing this week that Louisiana officials have made Category 5 levees their top priority. In an interview, he declined to embrace the plan, although he said Congress has a long-term financial commitment to the hurricane-battered region.

Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga., has a warm place in his heart for New Orleans. It's where he proposed to his wife and where he sent his son to college. But he said the onus isn't on Congress alone to send signals to evacuees that it is safe to return.

"People coming back to New Orleans will depend as much on actions of local governments and how they plan for their return as what the federal government does with the levees," Isakson said.

There are a few hopeful signs on Capitol Hill. The Senate last week approved as part of a budget bill the dedication of $1.2 billion to work on Louisiana's coast and levees by 2010; the money comes from the sale of rights to television airwaves as the country moves to digital broadcasting. The House is preparing to take up its own version of a budget with $323 million annually for hurricane protection. But it is unclear whether the House and Senate will even agree to a final budget deal, putting all the financing in jeopardy.

House and Senate negotiators this week agreed to spend $8 million for the Corps of Engineers to develop Category 5 hurricane protection plans for all of south Louisiana. But the bill doesn't promise a dime for actually building it.

Nov. 11, 2005


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Government; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections; US: Alaska; US: Louisiana
KEYWORDS: 109th; 5; category; confused; dc; ebbs; hillary; hurricane; katrina; katrinarelief; ll; new; orleans; protection; still; storm; support
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New Orleans mayor Ray Nagin speaks at a Veterans Day ceremony at The National D-Day Museum in New Orleans, La., Friday, Nov. 11, 2005. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)

Another story on Yahoo describes Nagin having trouble getting reelected - if there's an election at all.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/usatoday/20051111/pl_usatoday/neworleanselectionmayorbothupinair

1 posted on 11/12/2005 7:01:28 AM PST by Libloather
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To: Libloather
"Another story on Yahoo describes Nagin having trouble getting reelected - if there's an election at all."

Nagin will be reelected. The Democrats will demand that Nagin's evacuated constituents be allowed to vote by absentee ballot and a sufficient amount of ballots will magically appear to ensure his reelection.

2 posted on 11/12/2005 7:13:35 AM PST by DJ Taylor (Once again our country is at war, and once again the Democrats have sided with our enemy.)
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To: Libloather
"I think there needs to be a redevelopment plan that we can look to and understand what the scope and extent is," said Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska. "That's when you will get buy-in from Congress."

Any thing any one from Alaska has to say about spending money wisely is a total joke and waste of time. Until they drop their stupid "bridge to no where" they are just a bunch of buffoons, with no room to talk.

3 posted on 11/12/2005 7:18:04 AM PST by Mark was here (How can they be called "Homeless" if their home is a field?.)
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Comment #4 Removed by Moderator

To: Libloather
"I think over time we should keep reinforcing it and eventually get to a Category 5," Burns said. "That way we can spread the cost out over time."

Idiotic statement - instead of doing it right, from the get-go, ensure it ends up costing 10 times what it should by "spreading it out".

5 posted on 11/12/2005 7:18:49 AM PST by trebb ("I am the way... no one comes to the Father, but by me..." - Jesus in John 14:6 (RSV))
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To: trebb
Idiotic statement - instead of doing it right, from the get-go, ensure it ends up costing 10 times what it should by "spreading it out".

It is cheaper to rebuild the city every hundred years than build to contain the perfect storm. There is no such thing as doing it right, just too many variables. For a reasonable amount they can try to contain a Cat 3. More than a Cat 3 is just uneconomical, and sets the taxpayers up for a bigger liability. Build for a Cat 3 with no warranty, people can then take their chances.

6 posted on 11/12/2005 7:25:56 AM PST by Mark was here (How can they be called "Homeless" if their home is a field?.)
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To: Libloather

We produce a lot of heating fuel, gasoline, synthetic rubber for tires, the base products for a lot of building materials, detergents, and other petrochemical byproducts that we all use every day. Perhaps we could stop allowing the oil and gas industry from destroying our natural hurricane buffers, the coastal wetlands.

Let's see, how many states refuse any drilling off their coasts or refuse to allow drilling in ANWR? These same states also refuse to have more refineries built too.


7 posted on 11/12/2005 7:29:34 AM PST by CajunConservative
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To: Libloather

"Bush repeated his commitment to rebuilding the Gulf Coast. But when asked if he supported Category 5 hurricane protection, he declined to answer."

"Even an enthusiastic supporter of rebuilding, Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-N.Y., said she was confused about who is calling the shots."

How can she make a decision when Bush hasn't? Sbe needs him to take a stand, so she can take an opposite one and call him a Repubican idiot or meanie.

I think that's how the Democrats are taking their positions nowadays.


8 posted on 11/12/2005 7:32:11 AM PST by I still care (America is not the problem - it is the solution..)
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To: DJ Taylor
The Democrats will demand that Nagin's evacuated constituents be allowed to vote by absentee ballot and a sufficient amount of ballots will magically appear to ensure his reelection.

That will not happen. The people of N.O. blame Nagin 100% for the lack of perperation and evacuation. Its the media that blames Bush. Not saying another Democrap won't get elected, but after this fiasco, not likely to happen!

9 posted on 11/12/2005 7:39:04 AM PST by Bommer (To Ted Kennedy - "Fat Drunk and Stupid is no way to go through life son!" - Dean Wormer)
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To: ondaroadagain

I think the Gov and Mayor of NOLA think that by using the old axiom "the squeaky wheel gets greased" they will win out by whining loudly non stop everyone will cave and give, well Republicans are saying and rightfully so, I don't think so! LOL:)


10 posted on 11/12/2005 7:40:55 AM PST by stopem ("It's fun to be me" Denny Crane.)
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To: Libloather

keep in mind that the levees in New Orleans
are owned by the 'Orleans Levee Board', a state agency,
not the Army Corps of Engineers,

although the C-o-E may have some part in
their design.


11 posted on 11/12/2005 7:43:15 AM PST by greasepaint
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To: Libloather

Protection from the strongest hurricanes, state and local officials say, is essential to giving residents and businesses the confidence they need to return and rebuild.



How in the heck do you protect a city/county/area from the ravages of a Cat. 5 hurricane? My guess is it's impossible as the winds of a storm rated at a Cat 5 would do damage or even massive damage to most structures. Not a single area along the Gulf Coast from Texas to Florida has that assurance against a Cat 5 is my guess.

A storm of that magnitude would wipe out Houston to a large degree if it came up the ship channel. Wind would have the desk of the executives in the high rises sitting on the runways at Bush IAH and how much rising water damage would be done is a guess.

They need to get realistic.


12 posted on 11/12/2005 7:56:26 AM PST by deport
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To: CajunConservative
Let's see, how many states refuse any drilling off their coasts or refuse to allow drilling in ANWR? These same states also refuse to have more refineries built too.

You are right the "Not in my back yard" crowd is rather irksome, and pathetic.

13 posted on 11/12/2005 8:07:08 AM PST by Mark was here (How can they be called "Homeless" if their home is a field?.)
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To: ondaroadagain
I don't take issue with all of your statement but "N.O. is 12 ft below sea level"????? I don't think that is the case. It was swamped by a 12 ft storm surge that filled Lake Ponchatrain and it came over the levees but a 12 ft storm surge is not a normal everyday tide on the Gulf Coast.And BTW welcome to FR.
14 posted on 11/12/2005 8:12:33 AM PST by Ditter
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To: Libloather

Nothjing wrong with rebuilding New Orleans higher--as long as higher means on Higher ground. Its plain stupid to try to beat Mother Nature. Tear down the homes under sea level and build them, where they belong --on higher ground. Cheaper easier and smarter.


15 posted on 11/12/2005 8:12:54 AM PST by sgtbono2002
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To: Libloather
This is nuts.
$62,000,000,000 (billion) to rebuild a city of 484,674 people?!?

That's $127,921.04 EACH. For a family of four that's $511,684.14

Hell, just give them the money, tell them to move, then bulldoze the city and turn it back into a 'wetland' (swamp).

Okay, we keep the port open, but that's it.

16 posted on 11/12/2005 8:14:20 AM PST by Condor51 (Leftists are moral and intellectual parasites - Standing Wolf)
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To: CajunConservative
While I don't think the wetlands would save you from the "science" of building below sea level, I do agree that those residents of states that ban or restrict exploration and development of their natural resources, should learn to walk.
17 posted on 11/12/2005 8:24:46 AM PST by SouthTexas (What part of NO don't you understand?)
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To: Mrs Mark

The earthquake in Pakistan reminds me of something I read about Antioch, one of the great cities of the Roman Empire. It was leveled six times over a period of five hundred years. Each time it was rebuilt on the ruins of the destroyed city. Like living in Florida. Expect to get hit sometimes and prepare to rebuild until it becomes impossible.


18 posted on 11/12/2005 8:32:54 AM PST by RobbyS ( CHIRHO)
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To: sgtbono2002
The government should just buy out the people in the 9th Ward. They could then build wherever they wanted, including those places in the same area where it is thought prudent to build.
19 posted on 11/12/2005 8:36:48 AM PST by RobbyS ( CHIRHO)
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To: Condor51
This is nuts.

$62,000,000,000 (billion) to rebuild a city of 484,674 people?!?

That's $127,921.04 EACH. For a family of four that's $511,684.14

That's what it's already cost for welfare for the displaced citizens of New Orleans. Right or wrong, that's what we do in America--dig deep to help those who have lost everything. I know that a lot of these people had little or no work before, but we don't ignore them. And yes, it's costing about $100k per person from FEMA for food and housing for up to 24 months.

But in many ways it was brilliant to disburse these people into the rest of the country. They have a chance to integrate with more opportunities than they had in New Orleans.

I have a buddy there now rebuilding. It's getting more back to normal but the Ninth Ward will never ever come back. It's too low and will become a park or something. I've heard that 60% of those residents owned their own homes though so Congress will probably vote to give each homeowner $150k for their house and lot and call it square.

20 posted on 11/12/2005 8:38:20 AM PST by DJtex (;)
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To: RobbyS

Either that or swap them a decent lot on State property where it is higher. Its nuts to think you can build anything that Mother Nature cant beat.


21 posted on 11/12/2005 8:44:25 AM PST by sgtbono2002
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To: Ditter
I don't take issue with all of your statement but "N.O. is 12 ft below sea level"?????

Well, it is close to that. According to Wikipedia:

...The city of New Orleans actually contains the lowest point in the state of Louisiana, and one of the lowest points in the United States, after Death Valley and the Salton Sea. Much of the city is actually located between 1 and 10 feet (0.3 to 3 m) below sea level, and as such, is very prone to flooding. Rainwater is continually pumped out of the city and into Lake Pontchartrain across a series of levees and dikes. However, if it rains more than 1 inch, or if there is a major storm surge, such as that caused by a hurricane, greater flooding can occur...

link

22 posted on 11/12/2005 8:44:37 AM PST by Dan Zachary
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To: Dan Zachary
I have read that engineers suggested flood gates for the narrow opening to Lake Pontchartrain, to be closed during extremely high tides and storms. In hindsight that is what should have been done but the enviros objected. My grandfather survived the Galveston storm of 1900. Galveston Island was 8 feet high on the highest part. Grandfather said the storm surge was 2 feet deep in the second story of the house he rode out the storm in. The storm surge went across the island from the Gulf side into Galveston Bay and then the water came back across the island from the bay side, the returning water was just as destructive as the first time.
23 posted on 11/12/2005 9:00:25 AM PST by Ditter
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To: Libloather
A Category 5 hurricane is once in a lifetime event. My personal opinion is its cheaper to just raze New Orleans and let its inhabitants start new lives elsewhere. And many already have. It makes no sense to rebuild a city in a vulnerable location only to be destroyed by another hurricane. The federal dollars going to New Orleans could have spent much more effectively after razing the place, on helping the city's people start new. Yeah, its puts Ray Nagin and a corrupt city bureaucracy out of business. But that's a blessing in disguise and Mother Nature helped to lay bare the greatest of failings: that of man.

(Denny Crane: "I Don't Want To Socialize With A Pinko Liberal Democrat Commie.Say What You Like About Republicans. We Stick To Our Convictions. Even When We Know We're Dead Wrong.")

24 posted on 11/12/2005 9:06:48 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
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To: DJ Taylor

Nagin will be reelected. The Democrats will demand that Nagin's evacuated constituents be allowed to vote by absentee ballot and a sufficient amount of ballots will magically appear to ensure his reelection.


---Then IMHO they get what they deserve. The ones I will feel sorry for are the honest ones that DO NOT vote for him and are forced to endure it.


25 posted on 11/12/2005 10:24:45 AM PST by WasDougsLamb (Just my opinion.Go easy on me........)
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To: sgtbono2002

The parts that comprise the city center never flooded.


26 posted on 11/12/2005 4:06:51 PM PST by Bogey78O (meh)
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To: Dan Zachary

"However, if it rains more than 1 inch..."

Another reason why Wiki can't be trusted.


27 posted on 11/12/2005 4:08:52 PM PST by Bogey78O (meh)
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To: Bogey78O

Yes: I know. I only advised that those portions that go under water be moved to higher ground.


28 posted on 11/12/2005 5:27:30 PM PST by sgtbono2002
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To: sgtbono2002

But this is the first time they ever flooded. With the levees it was as safe as living in any lakeside community.


29 posted on 11/12/2005 5:41:47 PM PST by Bogey78O (meh)
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To: WasDougsLamb

Agree w/you. Check my tagline.


30 posted on 11/12/2005 7:36:42 PM PST by nuclady (( Nagin, Blanco and Landrieu: Wynkin', Blynkin', and Nod ))
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To: Condor51
The 62 Billion is for Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama all devastated by Katrina.
31 posted on 11/12/2005 7:46:26 PM PST by H. Paul Pressler IV
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To: ondaroadagain

Only a small part of New Orleans in 12 feet below sea level. Most of the city is at or only a couple feet below sea level. If the entire city were -12 feet it would have all gone under a 12 feet of water.


32 posted on 11/12/2005 7:49:29 PM PST by H. Paul Pressler IV
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To: goldstategop
An when S. California in leveled by a major quake do you expect the US Government to walk away?
33 posted on 11/12/2005 7:51:07 PM PST by H. Paul Pressler IV
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To: Ditter
New Orleans actually does lie in an enormous pit bisected by the Mississippi River (which flows well overhead). At its deepest point, the City, surrounded by swamps, marshes, and tidal pools, reaches 10 feet BELOW sea level. Without the levees, most of New Orleans would lie beneath the marsh water. Hurricane Katrina actually largely spared New Orleans; the levees broke the day after the storm passed. Only the northern (East Bank) half of the city filled with water, and then only three feet--not twelve feet--above sea level.

Had Hurricane Katrina NOT spared New Orleans, conditions would have been far worse. The surge on the Mississippi coast, which bore the brunt of the hurricane, reached 29 to 38 feet ABOVE sea level with higher waves, obliterating the Gulfport metropolis and killing hundreds there. And many hurricanes very narrowly spared New Orleans in the past, including Camile, a category 5 hurricane that nailed Gulfport, Mississippi.

Yes, Hurricane Katrina killed more than a thousand Louisianians, but if the levees had failed during the storm rather than afterward, the death toll easily could have exceeded 25,000. A small puff of dry air weakened the west side of the inner core while a particularly strong late-nocturnal convective flare on the east side induced a slight wobble to the east on that fateful morning. That minor phenomenon stood between mere obliteration of New Orleans and the annihilation of its non-evacuated population.

Reconstructing New Orleans with its former demographics, present level of political corruption, and current level of hurricane protection is profoundly if not suicidally irresponsible. I prefer solving this problem by relocating the city or using 25 to 50 feet of fill dirt to raise the elevation of the city and allow for more natural drainage.
34 posted on 11/12/2005 8:06:06 PM PST by dufekin (US Senate: the only place where the majority [44 D] comprises fewer than the minority [55 R])
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Comment #35 Removed by Moderator

Comment #36 Removed by Moderator

To: Libloather
"Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., is preparing a letter that she hopes Senate colleagues will sign that expresses their commitment to rebuilding the hurricane-ravaged Gulf Coast. Sen. David Vitter, R-La., said colleagues think he is looking for a blank check rather than merely a show of support."

"I think they are confusing, quite frankly, some sort of full authorization with that initial statement," Vitter said. "I'm trying to educate them that I'm not avoiding the normal stages of the process and just want a general, solid statement that leaves plenty of room for questions to be answered."

Hmmmmmmm, let's take a look at this. President not jumping high enough or fast enough, eh?

Landreiu & Vitter demanded $250,000,000,000.00 of our tax dollars on top of all the millions of dollars of personal donations, thousands are taken in homes across the nation to make a new start, and help literally comes from all over the world. Even Sean Penn of Iraqi Childrens Hospital fame went boating for floaters in search of fans.

The Red Cross, Salvation Army, and yes ,FEMA and dozens of organizations with thousands of volunteers we'll never know all the names of swarmed the area to help, and what did they get for their troubles?

The rescuers were held at bay where they couldn't help anyone when they citizens needed it most, the media, the mayor and governer immediatly go on a smear campaign against Bush, even though they ignored his and every other relevant official's urgent pleas to get the damn city evacuated, and virtually every black civic leader and congressman in the country polish up their racist badges and scream their racist, hate filled messages into the night, our president provides $62,000,000,000.00 to a state that is already being fined for defrauding the government out of millions of dollars that was supposed to be spent on the levy but wasn't, and they're wondering why they're getting the bum's rush?

It's because they're an ungrateful bunch of bums!!!

When are they gonna figure out that the only reason the libs and the media paid any attention to them in the 1st place was because they were useful idiots who helped lower Bush's poll numbers for a short while? (hint: too late)

Now that the players are done with them, they can become heros for a day by blasting Bush for wasting too much money on a bunch of corrupt public officials! It'll be "Bush Funnels Billions To Corporate Insiders", demands for "Accountability", "Commissions", "Grand Juries", and these same smug politicians that slammed FEMA for not having 5 gallons of gas on every doorstep while Katrina was still in diapers will wonder what happened to all their new friends. They really, really ought quit while they're ahead.

37 posted on 11/12/2005 9:25:26 PM PST by 4woodenboats (Revelations 20:4 - in memory of 3 Sulawesi children whose only crime was their faith)
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To: ondaroadagain
Portions of the 9th Ward went under 12 feet of Water but Uptown, Quarter and Mid City did not.
38 posted on 11/12/2005 9:34:04 PM PST by H. Paul Pressler IV
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Comment #39 Removed by Moderator

To: RobbyS
They could then build wherever they wanted...

They cannot exactly build wherever they want ... there is not a lot of vacant, undeveloped land ... most everything is owned by someone already.

40 posted on 11/13/2005 12:41:58 AM PST by caryatid (Jolie Blonde, 'gardez donc, quoi t'as fait ...)
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To: DJtex
... so Congress will probably vote to give each homeowner $150k for their house and lot and call it square.

How about giving them the assessed value [usually a bit low] plus 10%? I do not know property values in the Lower 9th Ward ... but somethow doubt that most of the houses were valued at $150,000 or anything near that.

Yes, the rate of home ownership is reported to be near 60%.

41 posted on 11/13/2005 12:48:41 AM PST by caryatid (Jolie Blonde, 'gardez donc, quoi t'as fait ...)
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To: Ditter
I have read that engineers suggested flood gates for the narrow opening to Lake Pontchartrain, to be closed during extremely high tides and storms...

It has been reported that this plan was rejected because it would make it impossible to pump water out of the city with the gates closed. Excessive amounts of rain will cause flooding ... as well as actual overflow of bodies of water.

42 posted on 11/13/2005 12:51:30 AM PST by caryatid (Jolie Blonde, 'gardez donc, quoi t'as fait ...)
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To: ondaroadagain
OK 10 ft 12 ft whatever, This should have been addressed long ago, like when it became apparent that part of the area was dropping below sea level. People could have been moved out gradually and the land reclaimed by raising it or made into wetlands.

There are parts of the east side of Houston (Baytown to be specific) that were overtaken by Galveston Bay. No levees were built to protect it, it was allowed to go into the bay and folks moved out. I don't know how much, or even if they were compensated. My Baytown relatives saw the handwriting on the wall and moved to Montana.

It has been a number of years since I have been to Baytown but the last time I was there you could still see a couple of roofs sticking up out of the water. Since NO decided to go the levee route, the water could have been channeled back to the Gulf instead of Lake Poncharatrain. The Lake could have had pumps installed, anyway, hindsight is wonderful but what to do now is not so clear.
43 posted on 11/13/2005 8:51:14 AM PST by Ditter
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To: Bogey78O

"The parts that comprise the city center never flooded."

I disagree. New Orleans floods on a regular basis, in all parts. I know from personal experience.


44 posted on 11/13/2005 10:50:55 AM PST by ViLaLuz (Stop the ACLU - Support the Public Expression of Religion Act 2005 - Call your congressmen.)
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To: ViLaLuz

Houston floods on a regular basis too, not because it is under sea level but because it is flat. You get 5" to 10" of rain in a few hours (not uncommon) and you get flooding but in Houston it runs off in a couple of hours. In NO it has to be pumped out.


45 posted on 11/13/2005 11:21:20 AM PST by Ditter
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To: Mrs Mark

I wonder what if they take it again next year? Maybe we ought to wait and see? After all:

"Global warming is real, it's very real..."

"The polar ice caps are melting they're meeelting."

"Why don't we try something different, something RADICAL!"

"We are destroying the planet's ability to heal itself."


46 posted on 11/13/2005 11:27:29 AM PST by Flavius Josephus (Hello Free Republic.)
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To: Ditter

I believe the areas that flooded are indeed 12 feet below sea level.


47 posted on 11/13/2005 11:29:31 AM PST by Flavius Josephus (Hello Free Republic.)
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To: Flavius Josephus

"I broke the dam."


48 posted on 11/13/2005 11:29:59 AM PST by Mark was here (How can they be called "Homeless" if their home is a field?.)
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To: Ditter

In Houston they have made the thoroughfares and freeways to be emergency storm channels. Whenever we get that kind of flooding we loose cars by the tens of thousands it seems like. Hate to think of a really messy rainy hurricane. We'd be in a heap o' trouble.


49 posted on 11/13/2005 11:33:49 AM PST by Flavius Josephus (Hello Free Republic.)
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To: Flavius Josephus

Do you live in Houston?


50 posted on 11/13/2005 11:37:21 AM PST by Ditter
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