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Boy Scout troop adds rescue to hike itinerary
The Times ^ | 11.26.05 | ROBERT STERN

Posted on 11/27/2005 1:38:53 PM PST by Coleus

The bird-watching hiking trip that the boys from Boy Scout Troop 44 in Pennington took Nov. 19 to Pennsylvania's Hawk Mountain didn't include plans for a life-and-death rescue mission.

Plans changed when the boys encountered fire-and-rescue personnel scrambling on foot up the mountain with their emergency gear.

The boys of Troop 44 didn't hesitate to lend a hand to the emergency crews after learning they were rushing to a hiker who had been pinned and badly injured by a massive boulder in an area that could not be reached by vehicle.

"We were on the last part of our hike," said Chris Brzezynski, 14, of Hopewell Township.

As the eight Troop 44 scouts on the trip, who range in age from 11 to 15, and their six adult chaperones walked down one of the mountain's trails, they passed emergency crews heading up.

"They said a woman's trapped" but told the scouts and other visitors to keep heading down the trail, away from the area of the accident, Brzezynski said.

"At the bottom, we saw a bunch of firemen and they looked really, really tired," he said. "So we helped them carry up stretchers, winches, flashlights . . . any kind of rescue equipment we could find."

The victim, identified in published reports as Sarae Rinker, 18, of Monroe County, Pa., was pinned by a massive boulder in Berks County's Hawk Mountain bird sanctuary.

Rescuers had to haul their equipment on foot to the site of the hiking accident because it was about a mile from the nearest road, said Dean Kniss, the assistant chief of the Kempton Fire Co., which covers Hawk Mountain.

Kniss said between 50 and 60 rescue personnel responded to the incident, which was reported 2 p.m.

"It just took a lot of people to carry stuff,"

(Excerpt) Read more at nj.com ...


TOPICS: US: New Jersey; US: Pennsylvania
KEYWORDS: boyscouts; bsa; bsalist; hawkmountain; nj; pa; pennington; rescue

1 posted on 11/27/2005 1:38:53 PM PST by Coleus
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To: Coleus

And some people want to keep these guys off of public school property.


2 posted on 11/27/2005 1:43:08 PM PST by SmithL (There are a lot of people that hate Bush more than they hate terrorists)
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To: Coleus

Ironic, the PA wing of the Civil Air Patrol runs a search and rescue school at Hawk Mountain.


3 posted on 11/27/2005 1:44:49 PM PST by lesser_satan
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To: SmithL

4 posted on 11/27/2005 1:47:14 PM PST by txroadkill
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To: RonF; AppauledAtAppeasementConservat; Da Jerdge; Looking for Diogenes; Congressman Billybob; ...

A Scout is Helpful.


5 posted on 11/27/2005 1:47:32 PM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: Coleus

Some people think that the corruption of our corrupt people will lead to a bad state of affairs.


6 posted on 11/27/2005 1:47:38 PM PST by handy old one (It is unbecoming for young men to utter maxims. Aristotle)
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To: SmithL

Yup, its sad the ACLU is attacking the Scouts. I was a scout when I was younger. Some of my best memories come from my days at camp and the campfires. I learned alot from the scouts and it helped shape who I am today by keeping me busy and out of trouble in my teens yrs.

I encourage all young teens to get involved.


7 posted on 11/27/2005 2:03:38 PM PST by BigTom85 (Proud Gun Owner and Member of NRA)
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To: txroadkill
I love the graphic. Although I've herded Scouts through airports to and from the National Jamboree without incident, my Scouts were considered a threat in March 2002, six months after 9/11.

I was escorting six 15 to 17 year-old Eagle Scouts to a rendezvous point in the US, where they would become part of a contingent of 24 Eagle Scouts flying to Japan. There, they were to represent the Boy Scouts of America as guests of the Scout Association of Japan and the Japanese government for two weeks.

In other words, they weren't just Boy Scouts, they were Eagle Scouts.

They weren't just Eagle Scouts, but had been selected to represent the BSA as American youth ambassadors.

And . . . they were in complete Boy Scout uniform, in public, without embarrassment.

Four of the six were pulled aside by airport security for the complete pat-down and hand-wand inspection. Then the security guards told me that all six Scout must surrender their large metal Philmont Scout Ranch belt buckles, because they were too big and could be used as a weapon.

I explained where we were going, that the boys had no extra belts, that, although Boy Scouts, their pants were baggy and would drop to their ankles without a belt. The guard still wanted the buckles.

I explained that these Scouts were ambassadors, would be meeting the highest-ranking leaders of Scouting in Japan, the Japanese Minister of Education, and other governmental leaders, and asked if it would be appropriate for them to spend two weeks holding their pants up with one hand.

About this time, a National Guardsman at the security point who had been listening to the entire conversation walked up to the guard and basically said, "Listen, Buddy. I'm an Eagle Scout. I know what those Philmont buckles mean. I have one. I am holding a rifle. My rifle is bigger than your gun. These young men are on their way to Japan WITH their Philmont buckles. Is there any part of that statement that you don't understand?"

We had a great time in Japan, and none of the Scout attempted any terroristic acts, with or without their Philmont belt buckles.

8 posted on 11/27/2005 2:05:13 PM PST by Scoutmaster
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To: Scoutmaster

And I forgot the most important part. Congratulations to Troop 44. A Boy Scout is Helpful. This Scouter is proud of you.


9 posted on 11/27/2005 2:06:11 PM PST by Scoutmaster
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To: txroadkill
Thank you for posting that image. I just sent it to a friend who has worked with the national leadership of the Scouts for decades. I believe he will share it with the National Scout Executive and others at BSA.

Congressman Billybob

Latest column: "51st Way to Leave Your Lover"

10 posted on 11/27/2005 2:06:56 PM PST by Congressman Billybob (Do you think Fitzpatrick resembled Captain Queeg, coming apart on the witness stand?)
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To: Coleus

So when is the lawsuit scheduled? After all, the wicked Boy Scouts took part in a government rescue operation!


11 posted on 11/27/2005 2:11:24 PM PST by gitmo (From now on, ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put.)
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To: Scoutmaster
First of all, thank you for your service to the young men in your Troop. Dr. Carl F. Zapfee, Scoutmaster for 40 years in Troop 35, Church of the Redeemer, was one of the small number of teachers who profoundly influenced all the balance of my life.

Second, thank you for sharing that (pathetic) story about the "security" personnel trying to take the Philmont buckles away from your Scouts. (I've been to Philmont and still remember the experience, 49 years later. And I am an Eagle, though I never had an opportunity to do what your group did in their trip to Japan.) I'm glad that a saner head prevailed in that confrontation.

Odds are, that taught your young men something about the institutional stupidity of bureaucrats, and the take-charge common sense that Scouts, and especially Eagles, should display when confronted with a challenge.

Cordially,

Congressman Billybob

Latest column: "51st Way to Leave Your Lover"

12 posted on 11/27/2005 2:14:17 PM PST by Congressman Billybob (Do you think Fitzpatrick resembled Captain Queeg, coming apart on the witness stand?)
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To: Scoutmaster

That's a great story!!

I just needed my project to make Eagle but it seemed so un-important at that time...


13 posted on 11/27/2005 2:14:35 PM PST by logic ("All that is required for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing......")
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To: Congressman Billybob
Make sure you give credit to the source, strangepolitics.com.

It is also an issue close to my heart, I'm a former scout (Police Explorer and SeaScout) and the father of a Cub Scout who at the age of 9 has already decided to be a Marine when he grows up, because, in his words, "I want to be an American Hero".

14 posted on 11/27/2005 2:17:01 PM PST by txroadkill
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To: Scoutmaster

Thank you for helping to mold the new generation of American leaders.

No matter how little power we give to the government, they manage to abuse it!


15 posted on 11/27/2005 2:35:20 PM PST by winner3000
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To: Congressman Billybob
My salute and thanks to Dr. Carl F. Zapfee for his influence in your life.

Odds are, that taught your young men something about the institutional stupidity of bureaucrats, and the take-charge common sense that Scouts, and especially Eagles, should display when confronted with a challenge.

The Scouts took the airport security situation in stride; after all, they are Eagle Scouts. What they really learned from the trip is that Scouting is a Movement, just like Lord Baden-Powell said.

I firmly believe that ALL Scout leaders should strive to get their Scouts to focus on the Movement beyond their Troop. Have joint campouts with other Troops. Share a summer camp experience with a Troop from another state as part of a joint Troop. Most of all -- take advantage of ANY opportunity for contact with the Scouting programs in the other 140+ countries in the World Organization of Scouting. Host foreign Scouts. Encourage your local Scout Camp to develop a program where a couple of international Scouts serve as staffers each year. Put together exchange trips.

One of my favorite memories of Japan was a scene that could have been written as part of a Hallmark-sponsored TV show. The Scouts spent two and 1/2 days in a youth forum, meeting with Japanese Scouts (male and female) and discussing through interpreters how Scouting could address the problems facing our world in the next century. After about a day and a half, I saw an Eagle Scout from Dallas and a young woman Scout from Japan laughing during a break. She was telling a story using a few English words she knew, along with noises and hand motions. The two of them were obviously bonding. Those of you in Scouting know that U.S. Scout uniforms have Council Shoulder patches that say where a Scout is from, as well as a U.S. flag, on the shoulder of the uniform. Japanese uniforms have the red and white rockers, like the old U.S. community strips, that say the name of the city where the Scout's Troop is located. The Eagle Scout and the Japanese Scout were seated in such a way that, just as I turned to leave, I noticed that I could see the flag on his shoulder and the R/W community strip on her uniform, as the two laughed and smiled. Hers said simply: Hiroshima.

Scouting is a Movement. Scouting is a guide for living life. You deprive young men if you lead them to believe that Scouting is only what happens in their home Troop.

Well, that's my soapbox.

16 posted on 11/27/2005 2:38:15 PM PST by Scoutmaster
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To: Scoutmaster

ROFLMAO

What a great story.


17 posted on 11/27/2005 3:34:55 PM PST by ChefKeith ( If Diplomacy worked, then we would be sitting here talking...)
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To: Scoutmaster
I was escorting six 15 to 17 year-old Eagle Scouts to a rendezvous point in the US, where they would become part of a contingent of 24 Eagle Scouts flying to Japan. There, they were to represent the Boy Scouts of America as guests of the Scout Association of Japan and the Japanese government for two weeks.

I had the privilege of acting as one of 6 leaders for a group of 25 Venture Scouts (23 young gentlemen and 12 young ladies) to Japan on a similar trip. It was the summer of 2004 and we took a tour of Toyko, spent a weekend with some Japanese families, spent 6 days and nights at Japan's 6th Venture Jamboree, and spent 3 days and nights at a hotel in Narita at the Asia-Pacific Youth Forum with a Japanese contingent and a contingent from all over the area, including Scouts and Scouters from Nepal, Bhutan, French Polynesia, India, Pakistan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Bangladesh, Australia, New Zealand, etc., etc. Great fun. Great kids. What a privelege.

18 posted on 11/27/2005 4:16:13 PM PST by RonF
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To: RonF
I was almost on that trip with you -- I had committed to handle the finances for that particular contingent before the the responsibility for the BSA/SAJ Friendship Program shifted to Irving, Texas and away from the Japanese-American Scouter who started the program. The organization of the contingent changed after that.

I'm certain you had an incredible time, and that your Venture Scouts came away with a better undertanding of Scouting as a Movement.

19 posted on 11/27/2005 4:59:15 PM PST by Scoutmaster
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To: Coleus

Unfortunately, the young woman died.


20 posted on 11/27/2005 5:08:05 PM PST by airborne (Al-Queda can recruit on college campuses but the US military can't!)
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To: Scoutmaster

Thank you for serving the Scouts.


21 posted on 11/27/2005 5:49:39 PM PST by mad_as_he$$ (Never corner anything meaner than you. NSDQ)
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To: airborne

Sounds like they gave her a chance.


22 posted on 11/27/2005 5:51:27 PM PST by mad_as_he$$ (Never corner anything meaner than you. NSDQ)
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To: airborne

I'm sorry to hear that, I guess she sustained some pretty bad injuries.


23 posted on 11/27/2005 6:33:32 PM PST by Coleus (Roe v. Wade and Endangered Species Act both passed in 1973, Murder Babies/save trees, birds, algae)
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To: Scoutmaster

Incredible story!


24 posted on 11/27/2005 6:42:35 PM PST by Tax-chick ("You don't HAVE to be a fat pervert to speak out about eating too much and lack of morals." ~ LG)
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To: Scoutmaster

We all came back with a better understanding of Scouting as a movement. I think, for example, that most of us were quite surprised to find out that about 2/3 of all Scouts are in the Asia-Pacific region. Indonesia has more Scouts and Scouters on their rolls than the U.S. does (8 million vs. 6 million), and they themselves estimate that they have at least as many more involved in the Movement that are simply not registered. There are a huge number of Moslem and Buhddist Scouts in the world, probably more combined than there are Christian ones. Many of us are still corresponding with the people we met via e-mail.

We all also came back with a better understanding of the world as a whole. Japan is just so different than America, in so many more ways than England or France or Germany are, that it really makes you look at the United States and our culture much differently.

By the way, this was an unusual trip. There had already been the "standard" SAJ-BSA friendship exchange earlier in the year. But the SAJ contacted the BSA and proposed an additional contingent for their Venture Jamboree and the Asia-Pacific Youth Forum. The BSA picked up about 20 people off of the waiting list from the earlier trip that year and proposed to send them to Japan. But the SAJ said "No, we want either 40 or none." Upon reflection I figure that they wanted to balance the size of the American contingent against the International one and to have a reasonably equivalent representation of Americans and Japanese in the two Venture Jamboree sub-camps that they sent us to. That put Irving in a bind, because due to the travel arrangement deadlines that only gave them 2 weeks to come up with 20 more people. Irving remembered that our Scout Executive had gone on the 2002 contingent to Japan. She had told Irving that they should call her if there was another trip like that, so they took her up on it. She sent out a bunch of e-mails and made some calls and managed to fill out the roster with people from our Council. It cost me $172 to get my passport renewed in a 2 week timeframe (no one could be confirmed on the roster until they faxed a copy of a valid passport to Japan about 8 weeks prior to the trip).


25 posted on 11/28/2005 8:48:32 AM PST by RonF
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To: Scoutmaster
If I may be so bold as to edit you, sir:

You deprive young men and women if you lead them to believe that Scouting is only what happens in their home Troop or Crew.

26 posted on 11/28/2005 8:50:14 AM PST by RonF
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To: RonF
You are correct. I have such high hopes for the Venturing program. The truth is that it has either succeeded beyond one's wildest dreams in a few locations, and failed miserably in many, many others. The program has been changed repeatedly since 1999 or 2000, whenever the new program started.

You need a community with a steady population of 18 to 21-year old men and women who are interested in the outdoors, or else the program has no leadership. In most towns, Venturing programs crumble because youth leave the program when they graduate from high school. Where it has been successful, the young women seem to have taken the strongest roles in Venturing leadership. At least two of the years I was at the National Meeting, it seems that three of the four Regional Presidents for Venturing were young women.

Over the last five years as a Scouter, as I've become more involved in International Scouting and seen that all but two of the 140+ WOS Scouting programs have successfully integrated boys and girls, the more inclined I am to continue to fight the God and gays battle, and to view favorably the possibility of a co-ed Scouting program at all ages.

The problem in the U.S. is that Girl Scouting is so well-developed, and so different than Boy Scouting in many ways, that I can never see the two programs merging. We'd simply have to call our program "Scouting," let the girls in, and let the Girl Scouts fend for themselves.

I know the idea of girls in Scouting is taboo for many older Scouters, but I've seen the successes of the Venturing program, and the successes of International Scouting programs that are co-ed.

27 posted on 11/28/2005 12:03:20 PM PST by Scoutmaster
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To: RonF

I think registration in Scouting is mandatory for Scouting-age youth in Indonesia, isn't it?


28 posted on 11/28/2005 12:06:21 PM PST by Scoutmaster
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To: Scoutmaster
I think registration in Scouting is mandatory for Scouting-age youth in Indonesia, isn't it?

I think so. The precision of how many people are registered are likely skewed to the low side because Indonesia is a 3rd world country on a 1000 island archipelago, and administration and communications are not of the highest quality.

29 posted on 11/28/2005 12:18:49 PM PST by RonF
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To: Scoutmaster

The GSUSA and the BSA are highly unlikely to merge. Work has been done on it, but their methods are too different. After what I've seen in from other countries, I think that you're right; that the BSA could open up it's membership to both sexes at all age levels and make it work. But it might be wise to at least leave the option that Boy Scout Troops could be single gender (of either gender) should the sponsoring organization so choose.


30 posted on 11/28/2005 12:20:59 PM PST by RonF
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To: Scoutmaster

My Council (Des Plaines Valley Council) has a small but very active Venturing program and I've been very impressed with what I've seen. And yes, young ladies tend to gravitate into the leadership positions.


31 posted on 11/28/2005 12:22:25 PM PST by RonF
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To: Scoutmaster

BTW, short backgrounder: Cub Scout (Bobcat --> AOL), Boy Scout (Life), Camp staff 2 years, High Adventure at Matagamon Canoe Base, OA; left the program at age 17 when I came back from college with hair down to my the base of my neck and the SM and CC took me aside and told me I looked like a pimp. Adult: CM 4.5 years, SM 7.5 years, did my | >>>------> |, staffed various camporees, staffed various training courses, ran a couple of training courses, got my beads from C-19-96 (Eagles), C-30-02 (Staffer), currently SPL for C-19-06, got DAMmed, CM award, Scouter's Training Award, Scoutmaster's Key. I've run the District Klondike Camporee for the last 5 years, but it's someone else's turn now. When I stepped down after my son got his Eagle and turned 18 from SM to ASM, the district made me District Commissioner. MC of our Pack, ASM of our Troop, AA of the Council's leadership Crew and DC are my current assignments.


32 posted on 11/28/2005 12:31:06 PM PST by RonF
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To: RonF

Most impressive -- but of course the key thing is "I Used To Be An Eagle." I never run into any other Eagle Patrol Wood Badgers.


33 posted on 11/28/2005 12:58:14 PM PST by Scoutmaster
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To: Scoutmaster

We've got a few in the Council, and there's always 2 or 3 at any gathering.


34 posted on 11/28/2005 1:35:05 PM PST by RonF
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To: Scoutmaster

So, you used to be an Eagle, eh? What course?


35 posted on 11/28/2005 1:35:28 PM PST by RonF
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To: RonF
Going private with replies to RonF.

I didn't attend the National Meeting this year; had just stepped down as Council Commissioner. One of the most impressive things about the Region luncheon meetings is the part where they present awards of heroism to Scouts. To those who attended: Any truly inspiring stories from this year's meeting? About three years ago, the Southern Region introduced an Eagle Scout who had been a POW in Afghanistan. You would remember him as the POW whose beaten and dirty face was on the cover of Time and Newsweek (both magazines, if I remember). He was a helicopter pilot whose craft was shot down.

He was from Texas, about 24, and had the best Texas accent and was the most polite young man, in full dress uniform.

When asked by the Region Representative, in front of a banquet of a 2000+, to describe his ordeal, he was very humble and self-effacing.

He said that, even without the tracers, he swore you could see the incoming rounds as they were fired at your helicopter. He said that the damage warning system for minimal damage was a heads' up screen that flashed information about damage to the craft in text on a green screen. When there was a major problem, a calm woman's voice would announce the damage, like "main hydraulic system damaged," "rotor damaged."

As his craft approached its target, he took heavy fire. He said he thought things were bad when the heads' up quit showing a line of type reporting damages, and instead just started scrolling text. He began to suspect things were quite bad when the woman began to calmly report one major system after the other as damaged. He said "when she started talking so fast she was stuttering, that's when I knew we were going down, Sir."

At any rate, they let him, in full uniform, present some of the Regional awards for heroism to the Scouts and you could tell that was a big deal for them . . . and for him.

One Scout from Tennessee had been the babysitter for a boy with Downs Syndrome -- and chose to do that because he had a sister with the birth defect. He was on a boat on a river in Tennessee, holding the three year-old boy in his lap, riding with the boys' parents and grandparents, and perhaps some other family members.

The boat exploded, killing the grandfather (at the helm) immediately. The Scout was thrown 100 feet from the boat, but never lost his grip on the young boy in his care, although both of the Scouts' legs were shattered.

He swam back to what remained floating of the houseboat using one arm, his legs useless, his other arm holding his young charge. Once he placed the boy safely on the wreckage, he swam and rescued the remaining members of the family from the water, some of whom were unconscious.

Those of you from the boy's Council in Tennessee can correct the details -- but it just goes to show the type of young man who scares the ACLU.

While you're at it, Tennessee -- I met a Scoutmaster from Troop 1 (Memphis?) who was in his 90's and had been a Scoutmaster for 75 years. When it comes to Scouting, Good on' ya, Tennessee!

36 posted on 11/28/2005 2:24:26 PM PST by Scoutmaster
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