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Science stumped on food allergy trend in children
The Seattle Times ^ | November 29, 2005 | BRUCE TAYLOR SEEMAN

Posted on 11/29/2005 9:32:46 PM PST by neverdem

Newhouse News Service

Multiple-choice question: Why are more American kids allergic to foods, particularly peanuts?

A) Their immune systems are confused by increasingly clean homes.

B) Nervous parents wait too long to feed their children peanuts.

C) We roast peanuts rather than boil them.

D) Maybe one of the above, and/or something else.

Unfortunately, the answer is "D."

One study estimates American children's rate of allergy to peanuts and tree nuts (like walnuts and pecans) — about 1 percent of those under age 18 — has doubled in recent years. No one can say why.

But whatever biological mysteries are at work, U.S. children are more likely to be allergic to peanuts than kids in China, in Israel and in many underdeveloped nations, experts say.

"It's a moving target," said Dr. Robert Wood, a pediatric immunology professor at Johns Hopkins University. "The numbers may be different by the time the next study gets done."

Deaths from allergic reactions to food are not officially counted, but studies suggest 150-200 fatalities a year, experts say. Case studies of 32 food-allergy deaths during 1994-99 showed that most victims died of reactions to nuts, most had asthma, and 13 were under 18 years old.

Though rare, deaths from food allergies can occur with shocking caprice.

New law on allergies

On Jan. 1, a new federal law goes into effect requiring food manufacturers to use simple language — milk instead of "caseinates," egg instead of "albumin" — in food products' ingredients lists. The law will apply to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, fish, wheat, soybeans and crustaceans (such as shrimp and crabs). Proteins in these foods cause about 90 percent of allergic reactions. Studies of peanut, tree-nut, fish and shellfish allergies suggest 11.4 million Americans, or about 4 percent of the population, have food allergies, according to the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network. Ten years ago, scientists believed less than 1 percent of the population was affected.

In 2003, about 1,800 children under 18 were hospitalized due to food allergies, according to a federal estimate. That number had increased only slightly during the preceding decade, but researchers say many allergic episodes go uncounted when hospitals misclassify them.

"The data are not clear enough to say what the true rate of increase has been, but we would be very comfortable saying the rate of food allergy has truly increased," said Wood.

The only treatment for a severe allergic reaction is a shot of epinephrine, a hormone that relaxes the airways of someone struggling with a life-threatening allergic response.

On Jan. 1, a new federal law goes into effect requiring food manufacturers to use simple language — milk instead of "caseinates," egg instead of "albumin" — in food products' ingredients lists. The law will apply to peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, fish, wheat, soybeans and crustaceans (such as shrimp and crabs). Proteins in these foods cause about 90 percent of allergic reactions.

Meanwhile, some advocates are pushing for federal guidelines for schools to create emergency action plans for allergic students.

In well-prepared schools, administrators have assembled teachers, parents, a school nurse and others to discuss how to handle emergencies and how to make a school safe, said Anne Munoz-Furlong, founder of the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network, a group advocating more protections. "Nut-free" zones are becoming more common on school lunch tables.

Even highly sensitive peanut-allergic children are unlikely to experience a severe reaction from casual external contact with peanut butter, research has shown. Soap and water effectively remove the allergen from surfaces such as tabletops, while disposable wipes work well with hands.

But reactions do occur, most often when a child unknowingly eats something containing an allergen. Serious problems result when a school's files contain nothing from a child's doctor about a condition, what symptoms to look for and how and when to give medication.

"A child eats something, thinks it was safe, but they have a reaction," Munoz-Furlong said. "They're sent to the office, the office staff calls the parents. Or the child has asthma, and they give her an inhaler. The reaction gets completely out of control, and when you bring epinephrine into the picture, it's too late."

An allergic reaction occurs when the body mistakenly identifies something as an invader and activates a portion of the immune system. People with hay fever, for example, overreact to the inhalation of pollen. The same process occurs in food allergies, with protein acting as the trigger.

In someone allergic to peanuts, for example, the body senses a specific protein has attached to cells in the body. To "protect" the cells, it sends out special antibodies called immunoglobulin E, or IgE. When IgE reaches the cells, it causes them to release histamines and other chemicals that may cause itching, nausea or restricted breathing.

In trying to explain the increase in allergies, many scientists have embraced the "hygiene hypothesis." It holds that some people's immune systems have gone out of whack because America's increasing cleanliness has changed the behavior of IgE.

The central role of IgE is to help fight infections. But as America has become more sanitary, and as antibiotics have cut down on infections, IgE has less work to do, making it restless and prone to attack new things.

"The more [IgE] is left 'unbusy' because we're not being exposed to germs early in life, the more it could direct its attention toward allergies," said Wood.

Some data support this idea. Allergy rates are lower in many underdeveloped nations, perhaps because the immune systems of those who live there are constantly exercised.

But the hygiene hypothesis, which would apply to all kinds of allergies, doesn't explain everything.

"It's not clear that it's the whole story," said Dr. Marshall Plaut, chief of allergic mechanisms at the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

Doctors have successfully "desensitized" patients with allergies like hay fever by injecting them with small but increasing doses of pollen. Such "immunotherapy" often causes severe reactions when tried against food allergies — an effect scientists are trying to understand and avert.

Mindful of the hygiene hypothesis, researchers also are studying whether exposing children earlier in life to peanuts and other potential allergens may properly prepare their immune systems.

Peanut allergy rates in Israel are low compared with the United States, and some suspect that's because many Israeli children eat peanut snacks earlier and more often than American children do.

"It could be the hygiene hypothesis," Munoz-Furlong said. "It could be the way peanuts are processed. In China they boil them, and we roast them. Or, it could be how they introduce it; in this country, we wait until the third birthday. In Israel, it's typically before the first birthday."


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Government; Israel; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: allergies; children; foodallergy; health; labels; myster; science; trend
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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CHRISTOPHER ROSSI / NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE
Second-graders Isabel Parks, left, and Alyssa Luz-Ricca eat lunch in a "nut-free zone" provided by their elementary school in Arlington, Va. Some advocates are pushing for federal guidelines for schools to create emergency action plans for allergic students.


DAVID BITTON / COLORADO SPRINGS GAZETTE
A sign is posted in the gym at Kilmer Elementary in Colorado Springs, Colo., to remind students not to take peanut products into common areas at the school to help protect students who are allergic. © 2005 The Seattle Times Company

More information

The Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN) Web site: http://www.foodallergy.org

1 posted on 11/29/2005 9:32:47 PM PST by neverdem
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To: neverdem

LOL...they've truly lost it..


2 posted on 11/29/2005 9:33:36 PM PST by Windsong (FighterPilot)
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To: Windsong

Kiss fatal for girl, 15

Sat, November 26, 2005
By CP

SAGUENAY, QUE. -- A 15-year-old girl with a peanut allergy has died after being kissed by her boyfriend, who had eaten peanut butter.

The girl died this week, a few days after being kissed.

The teenager, who lived in Saguenay, about 250 kilometres north of Quebec City, received a shot of adrenalin immediately after being kissed, but did not recover.

http://lfpress.ca/newsstand/News/National/2005/11/26/1324591-sun.html


3 posted on 11/29/2005 9:37:40 PM PST by LucyT
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To: neverdem

I guess it's time to start serving vanilla wafers for lunches at schools. We just can't take the chance.


4 posted on 11/29/2005 9:38:28 PM PST by writer33 (Rush Limbaugh walks in the footsteps of giants: George Washington, Thomas Paine and Ronald Reagan.)
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To: Hildy

FYI - since you were asking about this last night


5 posted on 11/29/2005 9:40:38 PM PST by Mo1 (Message to Democrats .... We do not surrender and run from a fight !!)
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To: neverdem

Perhaps it's because we've been playing with our immune systems since the 40's/50's.

Innoculations have probably saved thousands, if not millions of lives. We've tricked our systems into fighting viral and bacterial invaders though innoculations. Maybe this is a long-term consequence.

I said MAYBE.


6 posted on 11/29/2005 9:42:36 PM PST by colorcountry (That's what happens when you fall for a pistol. (No, no, I don't mean no gun.))
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To: Windsong
In trying to explain the increase in allergies

How about before we figured out how to save these unfortunate souls with food allergies, they died. Removing them from the gene pool. Now we save them and allow them to reproduce and make more poor little souls with potential food allergy. Or 2: There are more people now that know what a food allergy can do then before, hence an increase in reports.

7 posted on 11/29/2005 9:48:40 PM PST by CJ Wolf (BTW can someone add 'zot' to the FR spellchecker?)
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Comment #8 Removed by Moderator

To: CJ Wolf

..either way, pass the peanut butter please.


9 posted on 11/29/2005 9:54:49 PM PST by norraad ("What light!">Blues Brothers)
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To: neverdem

Peanut Allergy May Have Genetic Link

http://allergies.about.com/cs/research/a/blpeanutgenetic.htm

Transplant Patient Inherits Nut Allergy

http://allergies.about.com/library/weekly/aa013103a.htm


Peanut Allergy: Where Do We Stand?

http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm



10 posted on 11/29/2005 9:55:02 PM PST by LibFreeOrDie (L'chaim!)
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To: neverdem

This food allergy issue has gotten out of control. My wife had trouble supplying a snack for our daughter's preschool class because of the restrictions (take a look at how many products contain peanut or other nut oil in their processing).

I've read about the hygiene argument and it seems possible. I'm not a biologist and did not sleep in a Holiday Inn Express last night, but I've known several kids with peanut allergies. My parents' generation, who are now in their 70s, rarely had food allergies and even pollen allergies. I also noticed that many of them never wore glasses until they became farsighted with age. Of course, this is all anecdotal. I'd like to see something more scientific.


11 posted on 11/29/2005 9:58:36 PM PST by mikegi
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To: ClockWatcher

I feel for the poor kids and people that suffer from this. Maybe it's a miner's canary, but maybe it's just a glitch in how they were programmed. I hope they can fix it, I certainly don't want any of them to die.


12 posted on 11/29/2005 10:02:21 PM PST by CJ Wolf (BTW can someone add 'zot' to the FR spellchecker?)
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Comment #13 Removed by Moderator

To: neverdem

Early man probably ate LOTS of nuts, seeds, etc.....and some probably died because of the nuts.....just like some people who have bee sting allergies....well, sorta. Now, lots of babies survive who may not have otherwise, as others here have alluded....


14 posted on 11/29/2005 10:11:10 PM PST by goodnesswins (We would have WON in Vietnam, without Dim interference.)
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To: mikegi
My parents' generation, who are now in their 70s, rarely had food allergies and even pollen allergies.

On the other hand a lot of them died either in infancy or while they were toddlers. Did they even recognize those deaths as possibly allergy-related? Maybe it's just that children are living with an allergy in the 2000s that would have killed them in the 1930s and so it's just more visible.

15 posted on 11/29/2005 10:14:47 PM PST by FreedomCalls (It's the "Statue of Liberty," not the "Statue of Security.")
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To: colorcountry

When you understand what vaccinations are doing in the immune system I'm convinced there is a link. Purdue recently published the results of a study on vaccinated vs never vaccianted dogs that was enlightening; especially since so many dogs are suffering extreme allergies which vets cover up with Prednisone.


16 posted on 11/29/2005 10:16:25 PM PST by Arizona Carolyn
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To: neverdem

I never (knowingly) had food allergies as a kid. Now, as an adult, I have figured out I am allergic to tree nuts (not peanuts- thank goodness), soy, watermelon (!!), avocado, and a few other things I suspect (bananas, cucumber, and shellfish) but am in denial so I avoid most of the time and then pop Benadryl when I give in. I also have a slight problem with milk (skin problems) but can handle some dairy. Two of the kids have a dairy problem; one doesn't. I don't know what is going on, but I am not happy. I LIKE food and don't want to avoid it!!


17 posted on 11/29/2005 10:19:29 PM PST by conservative cat
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To: mikegi
I've read a theory of some researchers that a child growing up with house pets is beneficial in that it "exercises" the immune system. seems as though there may be a connection to this issue.
18 posted on 11/29/2005 10:22:28 PM PST by Riverine
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To: neverdem
I'll have to let my husband know that my "casual housekeeping" had its benefits as my children weren't allergic to peanuts. And thank heaven that they weren't as it was a lunchbox staple with three big boys to feed. In fact, if you forgot your lunch, the school had a jar of peanut butter for last-minute lunches. Furthermore, peanut butter was a standard food item given to you by the welfare department before the days of expanded food stamps benefits.

I'm 52 and don't remember hearing about food allergies until 1983. Then it was milk and red dye, not peanuts. The increase of such allergies is just as alarming as the genetic mutation of the flu. Things just get curiouser and curiouser.

19 posted on 11/29/2005 10:24:05 PM PST by MHT
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To: conservative cat

I never believed in this stuff until I saw my nephew nearly succumb to his peanut allergy. In fact, I think he attended one of the schools in Colorado Springs whose photograph appears in this article.
I am most sad because I cannot imagine a childhood without peanut butter!
I blame TV. I don't know why, I just do.


20 posted on 11/29/2005 10:29:03 PM PST by xroadie
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To: FreedomCalls
On the other hand a lot of them died either in infancy or while they were toddlers. Did they even recognize those deaths as possibly allergy-related? Maybe it's just that children are living with an allergy in the 2000s that would have killed them in the 1930s and so it's just more visible.

Possible, but I think non-lethal allergies are more widespread these days than generations ago. One other anecdotal note, I know two older women who developed allergies late in life. Any significance? I don't know.

21 posted on 11/29/2005 10:31:14 PM PST by mikegi
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BTTT


22 posted on 11/29/2005 10:31:55 PM PST by Constitutionalist Conservative (Have you visited http://c-pol.blogspot.com?)
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To: neverdem
I posted this more or less on a related thread but I think it may well be what's actually wrong.

Researchers started messing with the food chain via growth hormones in meats and genetically altering foods. That seems like a possibility. Artificial food additives is another possibility. When I was a kid bologna tasted good and never upset my stomach. Now one piece of it and within minutes I'm sick as a dog.

Nuts in various forms have been with us and eaten safely ever since. Many kids were raised on Carvers discovery of peanut butter. It has always been considered healthy. But when man started messing with our food chain {improving it as they call it} the problems seemed to become more profound.

Now even a loaf of bread can last two weeks and taste just as horrible & stale two weeks later as it did the day you bought it. Remember the term day old bread? It would be highly delicious and far more fresh tasting compared to the preservative filled loafs now being sold in stores. Some persons tolerance to these altered foods is much lower than others. MSG has to be one of the most unhealthiest food additives created by man IMO. I think food allergies for the most part are a result of mans tampering with what was once good food.

Doctors are seeing children especially girls starting into puberty much earlier than several generations ago. It all goes back to the basic scientific law for every action there is a reaction.

In short some of our programs such as vaccine programs carry a significant to a portion of the population for example autism.

Sinus allergies? Likely a reselt of the industrial age. Ozone is a major player in it and any person who has asthma triggered by allergies should not use an Ionizer type of air purifier. They will only make matters worse as they produce ozone. Save your money and buy a cheaper renewable filter type of purifier. Like I said a lot of the problems man causes via mis-applied technology.

23 posted on 11/29/2005 10:33:53 PM PST by cva66snipe
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To: LibFreeOrDie

Thanks for the links!


24 posted on 11/29/2005 10:49:07 PM PST by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: neverdem
It's all due to a general wuss factor.

My grandfather used to rub dirt in our cuts "to stop the bleeding". Actually he was making a point to my mother.

I should make a doctor's appointment, it's been ten or twelve years, and that appointment was for stitches.

Bah humbug, etc.
25 posted on 11/29/2005 11:09:29 PM PST by Born to Conserve
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To: neverdem

Thanks for posting this. As soon as I heard about the "teenage kiss that killed" on the news, I began wondering again, "what is it about peanuts?" It has been such a strange phenomenon.

I'm sympathetic to the kids who have it and I think it's great that the schools are going so "all-out" to keep them away from the allergen, but I have to ask - what about all the other kids who have other allergies?

My worst is perfume and though I've heard of schools now having "perfume-free" zones, I certainly haven't found any anyplace else. Not church, where I had to quit going; not restaurants, where my meals were ruined; not public events, where I have to change seats or keep moving around; not airplanes, which are death traps for me.

That one developed when perfume manufacturers switched from using natural ambergris from whales to a synthetic pheromone from chemicals. Right off the bat, I had hives in my throat and then asthma-like constriction of my bronchii. That was almost 20 years ago ("save the whales").

It was very scary, never having anything like that before, except from strawberries and cats. I could avoid those, but never know when perfume will "strike." I had to do some detective work to find out about the chemical substitute, too--didn't know about that for a long time, but once I read about it, I could pinpoint it exactly to the first bottle I was given that caused the bad reaction.

Yet, I'm fine with natural scents like oils and potpourri--which make others violently ill, if just for the fragrance. It was really restrictive for a long time, before they started making non-scented laundry detergent and fabric sheets, especially. There are still hundreds of products I can't even buy and experiment with, especially cosmetics and hair/skin care items.

Back to peanuts, though. I still don't "get it," but it seems the experts don't, either, so I feel better about it. (Like why did girls' feet sizes get increasingly larger after the Boomer generation?) And I really don't understand the generality that Americans don't give toddlers anything peanutty before age 3. Where did *that* statistic come from?

I do know some older people (70s) who have always had a tree nut allergy. I really do feel sorry for them--pecans and almonds are manna from heaven.

Then again, I know I inherited my strawberry allergy from my grandfather, who also developed his at age 30, just like I did. The thing is, I could still eat raspberries all along, which was wonderful, then all of a sudden, 3 years ago, I became allergic to them, too.

My grandfather thought it was because he loved strawberries so much that he overate them and that's what did it. But I didn't, and still "got it." I compared that to the alcohol/addictive cycle. Late-stage alcoholics are allergic to alcohol, physically, but just keep drinking it, when, in actuality, they've kind of used up their life quota.

I also developed a very severe allergy to poison ivy about 9-10 years ago and the CDC told me to also avoid cashews and mangos, as they have the same "poison" enzyme that I'm now sensitive to. I haven't tested that, since I hate cashews, anyway--and don't eat many mango products.

There again, nuts. I'm now newly asthmatic, at a semi-advanced age, and it's triggered by outdoor mold spores and stress--and very debilitating, plus bad for the heart. I never had any allergies at all, most of my life, except to non-gold metals against my skin and then the strawberry thing! I'm trying to see any common components to these, but I don't yet.

Maybe it's a mold that grows on nut trees or nut bushes or is in the soil of the peanuts as the embryonic nuts are forming. Wish everyone who is allergic to anything could find a permanent, successful cure for it!


26 posted on 11/29/2005 11:17:27 PM PST by Rte66
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To: neverdem

As a nurse, I've often wondered if it's not the soy link. Infant formula is made from soy milk. And, let's face it, the medical field is not encouraging mothers to breastfeed...why, I'm not sure, but since infant formula companies subsidize medical equipment purchases, etc. I'd say that there is a link there. But I'd predict that soy is probably pretty closely linked to p-nut allergy.


27 posted on 11/29/2005 11:51:06 PM PST by Shery (S. H. in APOland)
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To: Shery
As a nurse, I've often wondered if it's not the soy link. Infant formula is made from soy milk.

Not all infant formulas contain soy milk, but it has been noticed that infants fed soy milk don't develop as strong of an immune system. Apparently the problem has been traced to the fact that soy contains compounds that are similar to estrogen. So one would expect that infants fed soy would have less of a reaction to peanuts.

28 posted on 11/30/2005 12:29:20 AM PST by wideminded
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To: Shery

But that would not explain why kids in China don't have the same rate of allergic reaction to nuts. Soy milk is the major drink for breakfast in China, and has historically been more commonly drank than cows milk.


29 posted on 11/30/2005 12:32:49 AM PST by twntaipan (MERRY CHRISTMAS WAS NOT A PROBLEM UNTIL THE DEMOCRATS MADE IT A PROBLEM)
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To: Rte66
Maybe it's a mold that grows on nut trees or nut bushes or is in the soil of the peanuts as the embryonic nuts are forming.

There is a mold that grows on peanuts and produces a highly carcinogenic substance called aflatoxin. Apparently it is something that peanut producers have to watch out for, but I haven't heard of it being linked to peanut allergies.

30 posted on 11/30/2005 12:41:31 AM PST by wideminded
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To: mikegi

Most people eat food that has many additives such as artifical food coloring, artificial flavoring, preservatives, hydrogenated oils, and a lot of corn syrup. None of these were used a couple of generations ago. It is actually hard to find any "regular" food without these additives. Even when I was a kid (in the 50s) most food I ate at home was cooked at home. Not so any more.

Often when we shop, I look at other peoples' carts and compare the contents to our cart. Our cart contains ingredients like flour, milk, vegetable and fruit produce, butter, raw beans, plain oatmeal (not the instant flavored kind), cheese, and that's about it. Often other carts don't have one natural ingredient. All either cans, packages, microwaveable this and that, every bit of it pre-prepared.

I don't doubt that this has something to do with childrens' allergies. The body can only take so much garbage without some kind of symptom.


31 posted on 11/30/2005 1:08:55 AM PST by little jeremiah
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To: Shery

I have read also that babies fed formulas have a higher rate of various kinds of digestive problems than those fed mothers' milk.


32 posted on 11/30/2005 1:10:07 AM PST by little jeremiah
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To: Rte66

I can relate to your comments. I have many of the same allergies. It is a very complex subject. I am amused by the idea that a too clean house will cause children to have allergies, allergies are not caused by germs.
My mother was far from being a clean freak.


33 posted on 11/30/2005 1:47:44 AM PST by Ditter
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To: Shery
Soy products are chock full of glutamic acid. The label MSG isn't used when under a certain percent of glutamic acid. Natural flavorings, spices are terms used. Any thing "malted" as in malted barley or yeast has large doses of glutamic acid.

After an optometrist told me my retinas were degenerating and I had lattice degeneration condition I did some research. Stay away from all things with high amounts of glutamic acid. Its nasty stuff that was first used as MSG by the Japanese around WWII in order to get their troops to consume larger quantities of marginal foods.

34 posted on 11/30/2005 1:52:43 AM PST by x_plus_one
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To: Windsong

I would have thought so too if we had not had a thread like this one the other day. One Freeper said her son (I believe it was) got hit by a peanut butter cookie in a food fight. His sensitivity to peanuts was such that he had to be hospitalized. That's frightening.


35 posted on 11/30/2005 5:24:39 AM PST by Clara Lou
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To: neverdem
I suggest that they check the additive list for today's food compared the that of fourty years ago. While they are at it, comparing what they spray on crops now compared to fourty years ago might indicate something. Then, of course, GM engineering wasn't used decades ago either.

I think some things are "coming home to roost".

36 posted on 11/30/2005 6:58:43 AM PST by GingisK
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To: neverdem

For what it's worth, I have a sister who is now in her 60's, and she's been severely allergic to buckwheat and to cashews since childhood. She almost died, when a well-meaning friend served her pancakes. The woman had a small amount of buckwheat flour left over and added it to the pancake batter without informing anyone.

Food allergies are nothing to mess with.


37 posted on 11/30/2005 7:10:32 AM PST by Darnright (Remember that a lone amateur built the Ark. A large group of professionals built the Titanic.)
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To: neverdem

I'm slightly allergic to nearly everything.


38 posted on 11/30/2005 7:11:35 AM PST by Lazamataz (Proudly Posting Without Reading The Article Since 1999)
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To: wideminded

I could not breast feed. It didn't matter with my son. He doesn't get sick much, and is very healthy.

My twin daughters however were a different story. At 6 weeks old they almost died of a respiratory virus (RSV). They were on ventilators, one of them for a month.

If they were born when I was born, they would have died because they didn't have ventilators for babies.

I think there are a lot of kids surviving that would have died in the previous generation. I think those kids have problems.

Both of my daughters were sick a lot when they were young. One has asthma, but she is much better now that she is older (9). The other one has brain damage, and she has her own set of issues.

Both of my daughters are going to be successful adults, so I am very thankful they were save by medical technology. However, I just wonder if some of the kids with things like allergies, ADHD, etc are a result of being premature, illnesses, etc that would not have survived a generation ago.


39 posted on 11/30/2005 7:32:33 AM PST by luckystarmom
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To: Arizona Carolyn
When you understand what vaccinations are doing in the immune system

What, saving millions of children's lives?

Would you rather go back to the "good old days" of 30% infant mortality to save us from these pesky allergies?

40 posted on 11/30/2005 7:35:39 AM PST by TomB ("The terrorist wraps himself in the world's grievances to cloak his true motives." - S. Rushdie)
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To: TomB
Would you rather go back to the "good old days" of 30% infant mortality to save us from these pesky allergies?

I'd like to see a lot more studies go into the relationship between vaccinations and disorders such as autism. I'm not anti-vaccine but I do not support mandatory usage of it either.

No doubt in my mind that doctors are giving too many too close together which I think may compromise a childs health. This also may have cause the Gulf War Syndrome seen in Desert Storm. True it saves lives but also true is X number of kids will be spending lives in wheelchairs from them as well. Even a flu shot has that potential. Notice the show Matlock. Notice they don't show him walking in the later shows. He had Gullian -Barre syndrome. Transverse Myelitis is another possibility as well.

When my wife went quad 20 years ago one of the Neurologist first questions to her was about any recent vaccines.

41 posted on 11/30/2005 7:47:19 AM PST by cva66snipe
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To: TomB

BTW I take 10 shots a week for allergies :>}


42 posted on 11/30/2005 7:52:56 AM PST by cva66snipe
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To: cva66snipe
I'd like to see a lot more studies go into the relationship between vaccinations and disorders such as autism.

Here are some of the studies from the past 3 years:

"Risk Factors for Autism: Perinatal Factors, Parental Psychiatric History, and Socioeconomic Status"

"The Incidence of Autism in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1976-1997"

"No Effect of MMR Withdrawal on the Incidence of Autism: A Total Population Study"

"MMR Vaccination and Pervasive Developmental Disorders: A Case-Control Study"

"Relationship Between MMR Vaccine and Autism"

"Vaccine Risk Perception Among Reporters of Autism after Vaccination: Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System 1990-2001"

"Immunization Safety Review: Vaccines and Autism"

"The Genetics of Autism"

"Retraction of an Interpretation"

"The Lessons of MMR"

"MMR Vaccine and Autism: An Update of the Scientific Evidence"

"Age at First Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccination in Children with Autism and School-Matched Control Subjects: A Population-Based Study in Metropolitan Atlanta"

"MMR Vaccination and Autism: What Is the Evidence for a Causal Association?"

"Communicating Science to the Public: MMR Vaccine and Autism"

"Association Between Thimerosal-Containing Vaccine and Autism"

"Thimerosal and the Occurrence of Autism: Negative Ecological Evidence from Danish Population-Based Data"

"Prevalence of Autism and Parentally Reported Triggers in a North East London Population"

"Autism and Thimerosal-Containing Vaccines. Lack of Consistent Evidence for an Association"

"Measles-Mumps-Rubella Vaccine and the Development of Autism"

"Study Fails to Show a Connection Between Thimerosal and Autism"

Plenty more studies here.

43 posted on 11/30/2005 8:32:55 AM PST by TomB ("The terrorist wraps himself in the world's grievances to cloak his true motives." - S. Rushdie)
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To: Shery
As a nurse, I've often wondered if it's not the soy link. Infant formula is made from soy milk.

**************

Interesting. It seems consistent with the onset of the problem.

44 posted on 11/30/2005 8:40:31 AM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: FreedomCalls
On the other hand a lot of them died either in infancy or while they were toddlers.

Yeah, but this is different: it's noticeably more prevalent now than even 10 or 20 years ago, when infant mortality is no different from today. Perhaps it's just better screening, but I think there's probably something else afoot.

For example, things like asthma and diabetes are more prevalent as well. I'm guessing they're related.

I wonder if there's a correlation between these increases, and the increased use of things like hormones and antibiotics in our food.

45 posted on 11/30/2005 8:49:01 AM PST by r9etb
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To: conservative cat

Well, I have severe allergies. I know one of the things about allergies is that some of them take a while to build up in your system. So you can maybe eat shrimp once, and not have a problem. However, if you eat it a few times then you develop a problem.


46 posted on 11/30/2005 8:57:35 AM PST by luckystarmom
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To: twntaipan

Many kids in Asian countries are breastfed up to, and in some cases, past 1 year. So maybe Chinese kids get a leg up, so to speak, on stronger immune systems because of breast milk. Soy milk past this age might not affect them at that point. Speculating here...


47 posted on 11/30/2005 9:00:08 AM PST by coop71 (Being a redhead means never having to say you're sorry...)
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To: r9etb

I also think that more kids are exposed to bad things when their moms are pregnant. There are a lot of crack babies these days. What has that done to young kids?

I don't think this really account for an increase in peanut allergies, but I would imagine it does result in an increase in ADHD and other similar things.


48 posted on 11/30/2005 9:00:50 AM PST by luckystarmom
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To: colorcountry

Immunizations are nothing more than exposure to weak strains of diseases. Without them we would be exposed to the real thing.


49 posted on 11/30/2005 9:02:03 AM PST by js1138 (Great is the power of steady misrepresentation.)
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To: colorcountry

Peanut allergies are caused by too many lawyers and fearfilled public schools


50 posted on 11/30/2005 9:03:32 AM PST by Nat Turner (DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME)
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