Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

To: PatrickHenry

" "The clustering of regulatory sequences is incredibly interesting," said Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, first author of the Nature paper and co-director of the genome sequencing and analysis program at Broad."

I have been saying for awhile that this a key component in evolution. I think the more critters that get sequenced, the more profound these "non-coding" differences will be. I am looking forward, eagerly.


20 posted on 12/08/2005 7:55:29 AM PST by furball4paws (The new elixir of life - dehydrated toad urine.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies ]


To: furball4paws
I think the more critters that get sequenced, the more profound these "non-coding" differences will be. I am looking forward, eagerly.

We had a thread a while back on very conserved areas of the genome. One idea tossed around is that the more vital a particular sequence is, the more likely it is to remain conserved, simply because if it varies (which it may) the consequences are catastrophic, so only the conserved versions survive to participate in the biosphere.

21 posted on 12/08/2005 8:12:27 AM PST by PatrickHenry (Virtual Ignore for trolls, lunatics, dotards, common scolds, & incurable ignoramuses.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies ]

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article


FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson