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737 as popular as ever (Spirit workers to celebrate 5,000th fuselage)
The Wichita Eagle ^ | Posted on Sun, Dec. 11, 2005 | Reach Molly McMillin

Posted on 12/12/2005 9:57:19 PM PST by Paleo Conservative

In 1965, when Boeing launched its new short-range 4737 twinjet, some Wichita workers didn't think there would be a large market for the plane.

They figured the much bigger 747 would be the hotter seller. After all, airlines were using hubs more than they were offering point-to-point service -- direct routes between cities that bypassed hubs.

At the time, Wichita workers built the tooling for the 737 fuselage as if they would manufacture only about 100 planes in all.

Time has proven them wrong.

The 737 is the most popular jetliner in commercial aircraft history. It has provided jobs for thousands of Wichita workers for dozens of years.

This week, workers will load the 5,000th 737 fuselage onto a railcar in south Wichita and send it to Boeing's facility in Renton, Wash. In February, the plane will be delivered to Southwest Airlines, which operates the largest 737 fleet in the world.

Employees at Spirit AeroSystems, formerly Boeing's commercial aircraft facility, will celebrate the milestone on Tuesday.

"That has been the mainstay of our commercial line for a number of years," said Spirit AeroSystems chief executive Jeff Turner.

And it appears it will stay that way. At least in the short term.

Boeing has 737s on order for delivery in the latter part of this decade, said Boeing spokesman Craig Martin.

Just last month, airlines in China ordered 150 737s in a deal valued at as much as $9 billion on list prices.

Boeing said its newest 737s -- the 600, 700, 800 and 900 models -- are economical and the most technologically-advanced airplanes in their class. Boeing also offers a 737 cargo plane, a combination cargo-passenger model and a business jet.

With an upturn in the market, Boeing is raising 737 production rates. At the end of October, Boeing had orders for 1,046 737s.

"The orders have just been phenomenal," said JSA Research aerospace analyst Paul Nisbet. "We won't see any let up in production, I don't think, until the next decade, and then it's far from certain."

But will Wichita build another 5,000 737 fuselages?

"No," Nisbet said. "I think sometime in the next decade, (Boeing will) replace it with an aircraft that will have the same or better technology than the 787," Boeing's newest jet.

"We're surmising that in 2011 or 12 or 13 -- in that time frame -- talk will be about launching or perhaps actually launching a new replacement aircraft," Nisbet said.

Martin agreed that Boeing will likely replace the 737 -- there are still 4,188 flying today -- with an all-new airplane. But how soon is hard to say.

"The market is going to tell us that," Martin said.

Southwest Airlines has been informally talking with Boeing about the potential of using the enhancements in technology and fuel efficiencies found in its advanced design aircraft -- the 777 and the 787 Dreamliner -- to improve the smaller 737, said Southwest executive vice president for operations Mike Van de Ven.

They aren't talking about a total replacement, he said.

When there are new aircraft designs, "you get smarter and smarter and you learn more things," Van de Ven said. The airline is interested in how much transferability there could be to the 737.

"We have a great partnership with Boeing," he said. "They are very interested in our perspective."

Boeing delivered the first 737-100 in 1967 to Lufthansa Airlines. In the ensuing years, the 737 has kept thousands employed in Wichita, although employment has risen and fallen with cycles in the business.

Production of the 737 fuselage makes up about 45 percent of the Wichita operation's business, said Spirit vice president and general manager of fuselage structures Richard "Buck" Buchanan. Including the struts and nacelles -- work the plant added later -- 60 percent of the business is 737 work, he said.

Expertise on the fuselage is a skill Spirit is actively marketing to other potential aviation customers as it seeks to grow the business.

Spirit's Turner said he thinks Boeing will want Spirit to do work on whatever plane will be the next single-aisle aircraft.

The goal would be to win the same amount of work on a new plane as it currently has on the 737, he said.

"Of course, we have to earn that opportunity," Turner said.

In the meantime, "we are selling ourselves and our capabilities now to the whole industry," he said.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 737; 747; boeing
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1 posted on 12/12/2005 9:57:20 PM PST by Paleo Conservative
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To: COEXERJ145; microgood; liberallarry; cmsgop; shaggy eel; RayChuang88; Larry Lucido; namsman; ...

If you want on or off my aerospace ping list, please contact me by Freep mail.

2 posted on 12/12/2005 9:58:15 PM PST by Paleo Conservative (Hey hey ho ho Andy Heyward's got to go!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

The 737 is the B-52 of commercial aviation. They just keep on ticking.


3 posted on 12/12/2005 10:01:13 PM PST by COEXERJ145 (Those Who Want to Impeach President Bush Are the Party of Treason.)
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To: Paleo Conservative
Of course, what really kept the 737 program going was Boeing's decision in the early 1990's to build the Next Generation 737 with its longer range. Indeed, the 737-700 and 737-800 fitted with Aviation Partners winglets can easily fly between Los Angeles and Boston year-round non-stop on a full passenger/cargo load, something the A320 can't claim.

That's why if JetBlue had bought the 737-800 in the first place they wouldn't passenger load limits on transcon flights between the US West Coast and New York-JFK.

4 posted on 12/12/2005 10:07:19 PM PST by RayChuang88
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To: RayChuang88
Of course, what really kept the 737 program going was Boeing's decision in the early 1990's to build the Next Generation 737 with its longer range.

If Boeing had modernized the 727 by replacing the 3-man cockpit with the 757 2-man cockpit and changing it to a twin engine configuration, it's quite possible the 727 would have continued being the most popular jet airliner. It was only after the the 727 was discontinued that the 737 orders really started increasing.

The Next Generation 737 is almost a new aircraft compared to older 737 models. It has two totally new wings and new avionics. It has the same dimensions as the classic 737's so it fits at gates designed for older 737's and can use the same ground equipment, but in many ways it is mostly a new plane.

5 posted on 12/12/2005 10:21:46 PM PST by Paleo Conservative (Hey hey ho ho Andy Heyward's got to go!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

As a frequent flyer, I generally feel safe in 737s, especially compared to the A319 and A320, which just don't seem solid to me, or MD-80s, which are outright flexible (just sit with your shoulder against the wall near an emergency exit and you'll see).

But the single scariest airplane I've been on was an ancient 737 flown by Aloha Air, just last year. This was an original-issue model with the engines tucked under the wings without pylons. It was of the same vintage as the one that went "convertible" off Hawaii many years ago due to age, salt-air corrosion and the stress of countless island-hopping decompressions. This one had riveted reinforcement plates running down the full length of the fuselage to avoid the same fate. Not confidence-inspiring. Maybe Air Sibera runs older, more run-down planes than that one. But it got us from island to island in one piece. Keeps on ticking, indeed.


6 posted on 12/12/2005 10:28:17 PM PST by RightOnTheLeftCoast (You're it)
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To: RayChuang88
Alas, AirBus' offers of free money were too sweet for Soros & partners to turn down. That on top of not made in America had to be an easy choice for them.
7 posted on 12/12/2005 10:29:51 PM PST by RightOnTheLeftCoast (You're it)
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To: Paleo Conservative
My airline had the last 737-100 in commercial service in America. It was ancient when we got it, we leased it out, got it back again. I got bumped many times because of mechanicals! I hope Boeing preserves the first one off the line.


8 posted on 12/12/2005 10:30:40 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Screw Christmas, Happy Festivus!!!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

9 posted on 12/12/2005 10:31:45 PM PST by My2Cents (Dead people voting is the closest the Democrats come to believing in eternal life.)
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To: Central Scrutiniser
I hope Boeing preserves the first one off the line.

Wasn't the first one off the line the prototype? I thought NASA had already sent it to the Smithsonian.

10 posted on 12/12/2005 10:33:20 PM PST by Paleo Conservative (Hey hey ho ho Andy Heyward's got to go!)
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To: RightOnTheLeftCoast
Try flying on an Ilyushin 64M, real comfortable....


11 posted on 12/12/2005 10:34:31 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Screw Christmas, Happy Festivus!!!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

The first 707 is at the new Smithsonian, but it had so many modifications that it don't look much like a 707 anymore.


12 posted on 12/12/2005 10:35:25 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Screw Christmas, Happy Festivus!!!)
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To: Paleo Conservative
Fat Boy, the Secret to Southwest Airlines success.
13 posted on 12/12/2005 10:37:50 PM PST by H. Paul Pressler IV
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To: RayChuang88

Actually, the A320's that are out now with the high bypass engines can do coast to coast without any problems. Our first batch of A320's (from Braniff II) had problems doing BWI-PHX on a hot summer day. But our newer 320's and 319's easily did BOS-SFO or LAX-JFK. We have a 319 that does Phoenix to San Jose Costa Rica without any problems, and we also go to Cancun from Phoenix without much problems (even less now that we have ETOPS).


14 posted on 12/12/2005 10:38:29 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Screw Christmas, Happy Festivus!!!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

Nice bird...just avoid that hard-over rudder...could ruin your day!


15 posted on 12/12/2005 10:38:48 PM PST by ATCNavyRetiree (I can most times spot a liberal...they look weak, cowardly and undisciplined.)
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To: Paleo Conservative

You will get a kick out of this, from the December issue of Air Transport World "Through the Years"

30 years ago: ALPA and United's pilots may have won all the battles but lost the war on the 737 three-man crew issue. UAL sold two more 737s in November and has another tabled for 1976. It also plans to sell 10 others.


16 posted on 12/12/2005 10:40:52 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Screw Christmas, Happy Festivus!!!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

The 737 is probably the world's most overpowered airliner, and the Southwest pilots seem to delight in this fact during takeoff. If the country ever needs another medium bomber or cruise missile platform, the 737 would be just the ticket.


17 posted on 12/12/2005 10:42:57 PM PST by HolgerDansk ("Oh Bother", said Pooh, as he worked the bolt.)
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To: HolgerDansk
Compared to the 787? The engines on those machines are massive!
18 posted on 12/12/2005 10:46:05 PM PST by burzum (Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people.-Adm H Rickover)
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To: Central Scrutiniser
The first 707 is at the new Smithsonian, but it had so many modifications that it don't look much like a 707 anymore.

The Dash-80 really wasn't a prototype. It was a technology demonstrator. The fuselage was derived from the Boeing 367 Stratocruiser. I'm not quite sure if the wings were adapted from the B-47. The fuselage width of the KC-135 wasn't settled till the first order for them came from the USAF. Boeing later was forced to make the commercial 707 fuselage four inches wider after Pan Am ordered 25 DC-8's be delivered after the first 20 707's.

19 posted on 12/12/2005 10:47:52 PM PST by Paleo Conservative (Hey hey ho ho Andy Heyward's got to go!)
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To: burzum
Of course I should add that the 787 hasn't been built yet. But still, it will have some large engines!


20 posted on 12/12/2005 10:48:22 PM PST by burzum (Great minds discuss ideas, average minds discuss events, small minds discuss people.-Adm H Rickover)
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To: Paleo Conservative

It looks like its been made with bondo!

I used to have to walk beneath the wing of a parked 720B (which is still flying for Honeywell as an engine test bed) to get to the crew bus, it was a well worn PA bird. Rivet city, not pretty up close!


21 posted on 12/12/2005 10:50:16 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Screw Christmas, Happy Festivus!!!)
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To: Central Scrutiniser
A319s are smaller and generally don't have transcon range problems - it's a smaller plane.

JetBlue has problems with its Burbank-JFK flights because Burbank's runway is relatively short. So they limit the number of passengers on those planes. Some of their A320 transcons need to make stops if the weather is bad at their destination or headwinds are fierce, but I don't think it's as common as some think.
22 posted on 12/12/2005 10:52:46 PM PST by conservative in nyc
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To: conservative in nyc

I'd like to see them do it out of SNA.

It still amazes me that Aloha does Hawaii flights out of there and that tiny runway.

We start 757 service to Honolulu and Maui on Friday, finally got our planes ETOPS certified. Probably be a while till I can find an empty flight though.


23 posted on 12/12/2005 10:57:29 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Screw Christmas, Happy Festivus!!!)
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To: Central Scrutiniser
I used to have to walk beneath the wing of a parked 720B (which is still flying for Honeywell as an engine test bed) to get to the crew bus, it was a well worn PA bird. Rivet city, not pretty up close!

Is that the one with the 5th engine mounted behind the cockpit?

http://images.google.com/images?svnum=10&hl=en&lr=&safe=off&q=honeywell+Boeing+720&btnG=Search

24 posted on 12/12/2005 10:59:13 PM PST by Paleo Conservative (Hey hey ho ho Andy Heyward's got to go!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

Yep, I saw it flying a few weeks back, great to see that in the air!


25 posted on 12/12/2005 11:05:14 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Screw Christmas, Happy Festivus!!!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

One website said it was a Northwest plane, but it had a PA tail number, who knows?


26 posted on 12/12/2005 11:09:48 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Screw Christmas, Happy Festivus!!!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

I thought that Boeing celebrated the 6,000 th airframe of the 737? not 5,000,, unless that was a typo.


27 posted on 12/13/2005 3:26:22 AM PST by Prophet in the wilderness (PSALM 53 : 1 The FOOL hath said in his heart , There is no GOD .)
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To: Central Scrutiniser
To bad they can't put the first 737 at the AIR& SPACE museum or any other indoors museum to keep it out of the weather, just like they did with the original DASH-80.
When Boeing was developing and building the 777, they actually used the prototype 747 for a flying testbed of the first P&W engine that first went on the 777.
Needless to say on one of those test, the 777 engine backfired ( engine surge ) from continual testing and abuse from testing.
I saw on Airliners.net that someone showed pictures of the original 747 prototype, and it was just sitting in the desert, and some of the paint on it was just fading away ( a sad sight to see ) Boeing gave it to some air museum, but, it looks like they are not taking care of it.
I just wish they had room at the AIR&SPACE museum in Washington D.C. to keep these great airplanes.
I know the AIR&SPACE museum would take good care of these planes.
28 posted on 12/13/2005 3:38:41 AM PST by Prophet in the wilderness (PSALM 53 : 1 The FOOL hath said in his heart , There is no GOD .)
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To: Central Scrutiniser
I was wondering something ?
How come they can't reuse the aluminum from old airplanes, melt down the old aluminum and reuse it ?
I know they use aluminum from old airplanes for other uses, but, I am not sure they use old aluminum from old airplanes for new airplanes.,,,,,,,,, but,, then again ? if they are going to use composites, then, that is a mute point then.
29 posted on 12/13/2005 3:42:02 AM PST by Prophet in the wilderness (PSALM 53 : 1 The FOOL hath said in his heart , There is no GOD .)
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To: Paleo Conservative

I know the prototype of the 707 is there, the DASH-80, the very same plane in that picture that TEX JOHNSON did that barrel roll in.


30 posted on 12/13/2005 3:44:54 AM PST by Prophet in the wilderness (PSALM 53 : 1 The FOOL hath said in his heart , There is no GOD .)
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To: Central Scrutiniser
I was on a 757 once, loved the flight, comfortable airplane ( at least in my opinion ) to bad Boeing has or already is going to stop production on the 757.
31 posted on 12/13/2005 3:58:38 AM PST by Prophet in the wilderness (PSALM 53 : 1 The FOOL hath said in his heart , There is no GOD .)
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To: Paleo Conservative

Only white knuckles I ever had in a 737 were actually in a T-43 in the mid 80's, flying out of old Mather AFB with the 452 FTS. DRs and Cele were stressfull but I never worried about the airframe!


32 posted on 12/13/2005 4:08:31 AM PST by truemiester (If the U.S. should fail, a veil of darkness will come over the Earth for a thousand years)
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To: Central Scrutiniser
( http://www.flightlevel350.com/viewer.php?id=4595 )

( http://www.flightlevel350.com/viewer.php?id=4592 )

( http://www.flightlevel350.com/viewer.php?id=4583 )

( http://www.flightlevel350.com/viewer.php?id=4457 )

There you go, the 757 taking off for your viewing pleasure.
33 posted on 12/13/2005 4:16:44 AM PST by Prophet in the wilderness (PSALM 53 : 1 The FOOL hath said in his heart , There is no GOD .)
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To: Central Scrutiniser

http://www.flightlevel350.com/viewer.php?id=3821


34 posted on 12/13/2005 4:20:46 AM PST by Prophet in the wilderness (PSALM 53 : 1 The FOOL hath said in his heart , There is no GOD .)
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To: ATCNavyRetiree
Boeing did some modifications to the rudder and tail of the 737.
They increased the height of the of the rudder and vertical stabilizer of the 737, and re-engineerd the rudder hydraulic actuators.
35 posted on 12/13/2005 4:39:50 AM PST by Prophet in the wilderness (PSALM 53 : 1 The FOOL hath said in his heart , There is no GOD .)
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To: HolgerDansk

"If the country ever needs another medium bomber or cruise missile platform, the 737 would be just the ticket."

Boeing is now offering a maritime patrol variant of the 737. I just wonder if it can loiter like a P-3 Orion (descendant of another airliner, the Electra, although nowhere near as successful as the 737. Same goes for the Nimrod/Comet). Just add a weapons bay, a sonobouy dispenser, MAD boom, surface search radar, and load the passenger compartment with the signal processing equipment.


36 posted on 12/13/2005 5:21:13 AM PST by Fred Hayek (Liberalism is a mental disorder)
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To: HolgerDansk
The 737 is probably the world's most overpowered airliner, and the Southwest pilots seem to delight in this fact during takeoff. If the country ever needs another medium bomber or cruise missile platform, the 737 would be just the ticket.

I used to ride Indian Airlines 737s into the Shrinigar (Kashmir) airport back in the early 80s. I think that runway was about as long as my driveway, and the air was reeeeeal thin up there. Those IA pilots used to firewall those engines on takeoff and landings, every single time.

You think the 737 is a hot bird, but I dare say you have never felt what it is really capable of. When they set that thing down and hit the thrust reversers, you were thrown against the belt so hard, half the people would have bumped their heads on the seat in front of them, if the seat had not already collapsed forward.

Pretty exciting stuff. Takeoffs were fun too...

37 posted on 12/13/2005 6:10:18 AM PST by gridlock (eliminate perverse incentives)
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To: Central Scrutiniser

However, the A320-200's in JetBlue configuration still has trouble flying westbound from JFK to the US West Coast on a full load--I believe that JetBlue cannot fly the plane in full 162-passenger configuration on flights like JFK to Oakland, CA or JFK to Long Beach, CA. The 737-800 with the Aviation Partners winglets could easily fly fully-loaded from JFK to Oakland, CA year-round.


38 posted on 12/13/2005 6:22:17 AM PST by RayChuang88
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To: Prophet in the wilderness

That was the order not the fuselage. The 737 has a backlog of over 1,000 orders. That's one reason why Boeing is setting up a second 737 line in the space where the 757 line was. At one time there was speculation that Boeing was going to set up moving production lines that could produce both 737's and 757's simultaneously. Apparently it wasn't feasible.


39 posted on 12/13/2005 6:37:23 AM PST by Paleo Conservative (Hey hey ho ho Andy Heyward's got to go!)
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To: Fred Hayek; RayChuang88
Boeing is now offering a maritime patrol variant of the 737. I just wonder if it can loiter like a P-3 Orion

I wonder if the same plane will be offered as a BBJ-2ER with the room of 727-200 but the range of the BBj-1 or better.

40 posted on 12/13/2005 6:42:13 AM PST by Paleo Conservative (Hey hey ho ho Andy Heyward's got to go!)
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To: Paleo Conservative

I don't know. What would you use as two engines on the 727 to replace the three old JT8Ds? You can't tail-mount CFM-56s like the 737-300 and later use. And if you did what the "Super 27s" did and slap JT8D-217s back there (as on the MD-88), you've still got older, noisier, less fuel-efficient engines. RR Tays like UPS uses on their 727s? Or maybe IAE engines like on the MD-90? I'm actually surprised the 727 hung on in mainline service as long as it did (until Delta got rid of theirs in 2003).

I think the 727's the most gorgeous jetliner ever built, but I can see why the 737's eclipsed it. What Boeing's done with that design--swapping the old JT8Ds for the CFM-56s, stretching it, adding the winglets, almost completely recreating the avionics in the NG -600 through -900--is just remarkable. They've taken a short-hop 100-passenger plane and turned it into a transcontinental plane hauling nearly 170-180 people.

But nothing compares to the sound of three JT8Ds wide open and belching soot. Hush kits? We don' need no steenkin' hush kits! :)

}:-)4


41 posted on 12/13/2005 8:14:34 AM PST by Moose4 (Liberals and vampires: Both like death, both hate crosses, and both are bloodsuckers.)
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To: Paleo Conservative
If Boeing had modernized the 727 by replacing the 3-man cockpit with the 757 2-man cockpit and changing it to a twin engine configuration

You would pretty much have an MD-88, but with 3 across rather than 2 across seating.

Maximum seating -
MD-88 - 172, typical 142
727-200 (streatched version) - 189, typical 145.

So in a standard layout, there is a 3 seat differential.

42 posted on 12/13/2005 8:59:28 AM PST by PAR35
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To: Central Scrutiniser
America West/US Airways, right?

I always follow the Today in the Sky blog and noticed that they mentioned this today too.

43 posted on 12/13/2005 9:35:59 AM PST by Dan Nunn (http://marklevinfan.com/Audio/WhyAreWeAtWar.wma)
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To: Dan Nunn

Its America West crews and iron, US doesn't have the rights to fly the flights, as they don't have ETOPS on their certificate. We also have the right to do one Europe flight with our certificate, possibly Dublin or Shannon.


44 posted on 12/13/2005 10:31:59 AM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Screw Christmas, Happy Festivus!!!)
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To: HolgerDansk

Speaking of Southwest, I was on a flight arriving at Sacramento. There was a pretty stiff headwind (as is often the case during certain times of the year in Sac), and the touchdown was a bit hard. As we taxied to the gate, the hostess gave her usual "welcome to Sacramento, thank you for flying Southwest," and added "and we hope you enjoyed that demonstration of Naval aviation upon landing."


45 posted on 12/13/2005 11:04:20 AM PST by My2Cents (Dead people voting is the closest the Democrats come to believing in eternal life.)
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To: Moose4
You can't tail-mount CFM-56s like the 737-300 and later use.

Why not. I'm talking about replacing the three engine configuration with two more powerful side mounted engines and getting rid of the S-ducted middle engine. I don't see why the CFM-56 engines wouldn't have worked in that configuration. In fact it wouldn't have required the extreme modifications to the engines and nacelles that were required to put them on the 737.

What Boeing's done with that design--swapping the old JT8Ds for the CFM-56s, stretching it, adding the winglets, almost completely recreating the avionics in the NG -600 through -900--is just remarkable.

They didn't just add winglets. The NG 737 has two whole new wings. There's the wing for the 737 600 and 700 and the wing for the 800 and 900. They are supercritical airfoils like the one on the 777.

46 posted on 12/13/2005 11:49:28 AM PST by Paleo Conservative (Hey hey ho ho Andy Heyward's got to go!)
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To: PAR35
You would pretty much have an MD-88, but with 3 across rather than 2 across seating.

But it would have standardized the 757/767 cockpit on smaller aircraft. One of Airbus' selling points in the comonality of cockpit layouts across their whole line of aircraft.

47 posted on 12/13/2005 11:56:59 AM PST by Paleo Conservative (Hey hey ho ho Andy Heyward's got to go!)
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To: Paleo Conservative
But it would have standardized the 757/767 cockpit on smaller aircraft.

Instead, they put the cockpit in the 757 for their large, single aisle plane, before dumping the whole concept of large, single aisle planes except for the 737 in cattle car configuration where it will hold up to 189 - identical to the maximum on the 727.

48 posted on 12/13/2005 12:35:06 PM PST by PAR35
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To: PAR35
Instead, they put the cockpit in the 757 for their large, single aisle plane, before dumping the whole concept of large, single aisle planes except for the 737 in cattle car configuration where it will hold up to 189 - identical to the maximum on the 727.

The 737-900ER will be able to hold up to 215 passengers in cattle car configuration so it will be able to replace the 757-200 for domestic markets. The 757 has become popular for long thin trans-Atlantic operations so some airlines that own 757's might want to replace their domestic 757's with 737-900ER's in order to redeploy their 757's.

49 posted on 12/13/2005 2:57:17 PM PST by Paleo Conservative (Hey hey ho ho Andy Heyward's got to go!)
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To: RayChuang88
That's why if JetBlue had bought the 737-800 in the first place they wouldn't passenger load limits on transcon flights between the US West Coast and New York-JFK.

I don't understand your post. I flew JetBlue last month from JFK to San Diego and back and there wasn't an empty seat on either flight.

50 posted on 12/13/2005 3:05:59 PM PST by jalisco555 ("The right to bear weapons is the right to be free." A. E. Van Vogt)
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