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This Day In History WAR OF 1812 ENDS December 24, 1814
http://www.historychannel.com/tdih/tdih.jsp?category=leadstory ^

Posted on 12/24/2005 3:09:08 AM PST by mainepatsfan

This Day In History | General Interest

WAR OF 1812 ENDS: December 24, 1814

The Treaty of Peace and Amity between His Britannic Majesty and the United States of America is signed by British and American representatives at Ghent, Belgium, ending the War of 1812. By terms of the treaty, all conquered territory was to be returned, and commissions were planned to settle the boundary of the United States and Canada.

In June 1812, the United States declared war against Great Britain in reaction to three issues: the British economic blockade of France, the induction of thousands of neutral American seamen into the British Royal Navy against their will, and the British support of hostile Indian tribes along the Great Lakes frontier. A faction of Congress, made up mostly of western and southern congressmen, had been advocating the declaration of war for several years. These "War Hawks," as they were known, hoped that war with Britain, which was preoccupied with its struggle against Napoleonic France, would result in U.S. territorial gains in Canada and British-protected Florida.

In the months following the U.S. declaration of war, American forces launched a three-point invasion of Canada, all of which were repulsed. At sea, however, the United States was more successful, and the USS Constitution and other American frigates won a series of victories over British warships. In 1813, American forces won several key victories in the Great Lakes region, but Britain regained control of the sea and blockaded the eastern seaboard.

In 1814, with the downfall of Napoleon, the British were able to allocate more military resources to the American war, and Washington, D.C., fell to the British in August. In Washington, British troops burned the White House, the Capitol, and other buildings in retaliation for the earlier burning of government buildings in Canada by U.S. soldiers. The British soon retreated, however, and Fort McHenry in Baltimore harbor withstood a massive British bombardment and inspired Francis Scott Key to pen the "Star-Spangled Banner."

On September 11, 1814, the tide of the war turned when Thomas Macdonough's American naval force won a decisive victory at the Battle of Plattsburg Bay on Lake Champlain. A large British army under Sir George Prevost was thus forced to abandon its invasion of the U.S. northeast and retreat to Canada. The American victory on Lake Champlain led to the conclusion of U.S.-British peace negotiations in Belgium, and on December 24, 1814, the Treaty of Ghent was signed, ending the war. Although the treaty said nothing about two of the key issues that started the war--the rights of neutral U.S. vessels and the impressment of U.S. sailors--it did open up the Great Lakes region to American expansion and was hailed as a diplomatic victory in the United States.

News of the treaty took almost two months to cross the Atlantic, and British forces were not informed of the end of hostilities in time to end their drive against the mouth of the Mississippi River. On January 8, 1815, a large British army attacked New Orleans and was decimated by an inferior American force under General Andrew Jackson in the most spectacular U.S. victory of the war. The American public heard of the Battle of New Orleans and the Treaty of Ghent at approximately the same time, fostering a greater sentiment of self-confidence and shared identity throughout the young republic.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: americanhistory; warof1812

1 posted on 12/24/2005 3:09:09 AM PST by mainepatsfan
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To: mainepatsfan
So when was the War of 1812 fought?
2 posted on 12/24/2005 3:16:08 AM PST by rogue yam
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To: mainepatsfan
It's called The War of 1812 for two reasons;

1. The war started in 1812
2. Only 1,812 Americans know anything about this war!

Great post, thanks!

3 posted on 12/24/2005 3:17:12 AM PST by NewLand (Posting against liberalism since the 20th century!)
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To: rogue yam

What about the battle of New Orleans? Weren't the British repelled there in that war?


4 posted on 12/24/2005 3:20:49 AM PST by Dudoight
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To: NewLand

The bottom line here is that we kicked limey butt twice, and if they need for us to make it a hat trick, they know where we are!


5 posted on 12/24/2005 3:20:59 AM PST by rogue yam
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To: mainepatsfan
In Washington, British troops burned the White House, the Capitol,

An undeserved favour, IMO.
6 posted on 12/24/2005 3:30:08 AM PST by English Nationalist
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To: mainepatsfan

Finally!...Breaking news on the war of 1812! I was wondering why we weren't getting regular updates.


7 posted on 12/24/2005 4:08:06 AM PST by NoControllingLegalAuthority
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To: mainepatsfan

Fantastic post.

Q1: How do you get a big ship onto Lake Champlain? I have followed the Mapquest map from Plattsburg south and north and can't find a connecting river.


8 posted on 12/24/2005 4:12:22 AM PST by caddie
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To: mainepatsfan

By the way, how is the Peloponnesian War going? We haven't heard a peep out of Thucydides in weeks. It's so hard on the families when mail from the front lines is so sporadic.


9 posted on 12/24/2005 4:14:35 AM PST by NoControllingLegalAuthority
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To: English Nationalist
At sea, however, the United States was more successful, and the USS Constitution and other American frigates won a series of victories over British warships

I've always thought it interesting that the only ones with any real chance of beating the Brits at sea were always the Americans, the Brit's direct inheritors. That's probably still true to this day, I think Britain has the world's second most formidable navy still.
10 posted on 12/24/2005 4:15:21 AM PST by starbase (Understanding Written Propaganda (click "starbase" to learn 22 manipulating tricks!!))
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To: Dudoight
What about the battle of New Orleans? Weren't the British repelled there in that war?

Actually, the British were repelled there after that war. As with many early wars, news of the finish didn't catch up to the commanders in time to prevent some actions. Of course, I think that even if Jackson had known the war was over, he'd have still fought the battle.

11 posted on 12/24/2005 4:16:18 AM PST by Quiller (When you're fighting to survive, second place sucks.)
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To: NoControllingLegalAuthority
By the way, how is the Peloponnesian War going?

No kidding, I had to practically run a marathon just to find a recent headline.
12 posted on 12/24/2005 4:18:45 AM PST by starbase (Understanding Written Propaganda (click "starbase" to learn 22 manipulating tricks!!))
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To: NoControllingLegalAuthority
By the way, how is the Peloponnesian War going? We haven't heard a peep out of Thucydides in weeks. It's so hard on the families when mail from the front lines is so sporadic.

It must be going well. It it was going badly then the mainstream media would be telling us about what a quagmire it is.

13 posted on 12/24/2005 4:19:33 AM PST by Non-Sequitur
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To: Dudoight
What about the battle of New Orleans? Weren't the British repelled there in that war?

Unless you are being sarcastic about the post concerning when the 1812 War took place, the last paragraph in the article addresses your question and, even if you are being sarcastic, it still addresses it.

14 posted on 12/24/2005 4:19:36 AM PST by johniegrad
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To: caddie
Q1: How do you get a big ship onto Lake Champlain? I have followed the Mapquest map from Plattsburg south and north and can't find a connecting river.

A1: You build it there.

15 posted on 12/24/2005 4:20:38 AM PST by Non-Sequitur
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To: caddie
Q1: How do you get a big ship onto Lake Champlain? I have followed the Mapquest map from Plattsburg south and north and can't find a connecting river

The British lack of knowledge about the geography of the area was an advantage. Since they didn't know that the lake was landlocked, they were able to simply sail the vessel to the lake.

16 posted on 12/24/2005 4:23:56 AM PST by johniegrad
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To: mainepatsfan

Come to think of it, we haven't heard from General Custer since early June. His last letter indicated morale was high within the Seventh Cavalry and he was confident of a swift and decisive victory against the hostiles.


17 posted on 12/24/2005 4:25:04 AM PST by NoControllingLegalAuthority
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To: mainepatsfan
"On January 8, 1815, a large British army attacked New Orleans and was decimated by an inferior American force under General Andrew Jackson in the most spectacular U.S. victory of the war."

I have visited the battlefield in Chalmette, LA. It is very interesting to see how it is laid out and one can drive around the battlefield and read little plaques that describe who was posted where and how they advanced.

Since Chalmette was flooded badly during Katrina and the battlefield is right next to the river, I wonder how it faired.

http://www.nps.gov/jela/Chalmettebattlefield.htm
18 posted on 12/24/2005 4:25:22 AM PST by Ninian Dryhope ("Bush lied, people dyed. Their fingers." The inestimable Mark Steyn)
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To: mainepatsfan
In 1814, we took a little trip
Along with Col Jackson down the mighty Mississip
We took a little bacon, and we took a little beans
And we caught the bloody British at the town of New Orleans...

19 posted on 12/24/2005 4:34:51 AM PST by ken5050 (Ann Coulter needs to have children ASAP to pass on her gene pool....any volunteers?)
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To: Non-Sequitur
how is the Peloponnesian War going?

A blockbuster article is coming out next week in Newsweak about how the Greeks can't get enough up-armored Hoplites to fight the war effectively. And it appears that cronies of Dick Cheney influenced the contracts for the production of a new, more powerful spear.

20 posted on 12/24/2005 4:43:54 AM PST by Hardastarboard
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To: Hardastarboard
A blockbuster article is coming out next week in Newsweak about how the Greeks can't get enough up-armored Hoplites to fight the war effectively. And it appears that cronies of Dick Cheney influenced the contracts for the production of a new, more powerful spear.

I knew Haliburton had to be involved somehow.

21 posted on 12/24/2005 4:45:15 AM PST by Non-Sequitur
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To: NewLand

I agree but there is a third reason. It was called the War of 1812 because it was a War.


22 posted on 12/24/2005 5:10:53 AM PST by Malesherbes
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To: mainepatsfan

The Shawnee took up arms against the United States and fought with the British during this war. Tecumseh was made a British Brigadier General. This negated the treaty allowing the warlike Shawnee to live in Ohio. Today's Shawnee, despite this are claiming thousands of acres that was "stolen" from them. No matter how many times I bring up this fact in public debate I NEVER get a response comcerning this, it is glossed over. Oh, they want to build mob ran casinos on land that was "stolen" from their victimized ancestors. This despite Ohio law.


23 posted on 12/24/2005 5:21:22 AM PST by HankReardon
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To: caddie

They were built on the lake shore.


24 posted on 12/24/2005 5:23:47 AM PST by HankReardon
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To: mainepatsfan

Here's a bit of 1812 lore -

When the British attacked Washington, a Marine officer ordered two of his men to hide the gold and silver which made up the Marine Corps budget. The men hid the treasure and then ran out to engage the enemy.

Both men died in the battle, taking the location of the buried treasure with them. To this day it's believed that somewhere in the walls of the old Marine Corps barrack is hidden a treasure of gold and silver.


25 posted on 12/24/2005 5:59:39 AM PST by sergeantdave (Member of the Arbor Day Foundation, travelling the country and destroying open space)
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To: mainepatsfan

And we did up up with Florida.


26 posted on 12/24/2005 6:01:21 AM PST by Tribune7
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To: mainepatsfan

"In Washington, British troops burned the White House, the Capitol, and other buildings in retaliation for the earlier burning of government buildings in Canada by U.S. soldiers."


I thought blaming American troops was something that started in the Vietnam era?


27 posted on 12/24/2005 6:07:00 AM PST by armydawg1 (" America must win this war..." PVT Martin Treptow, KIA, WW1)
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To: Malesherbes

oops!


28 posted on 12/24/2005 6:19:56 AM PST by NewLand (Posting against liberalism since the 20th century!)
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To: rogue yam

If it wasn't for the American attitudes and tactics during the War of 1812, Canada would have long been a part of the USA. Upper Canada had more than 1/4 and possibly 1/3 of its residents born in the US and they didn't have that much loyalty to the Crown. The French certainly didn't.

Nevertheless, it took this invasion and the burning of the capital (including the Parliament Buildings - which prompted the retaliatory burning of the White House) to unite the United Empire Loyalists and the European born, the French speaking, and the American born. Confederation in 1867 followed.

And Paul Martin is using the same rhetoric today in order to get re elected.


29 posted on 12/24/2005 6:29:23 AM PST by MarkBsnr (When you believe in nothing, then everything is acceptable.)
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To: mainepatsfan

My GGGGG-Grandfather served in the War of 1812. I contacted the National Archives for his records and was amazed to receive a huge envelope with more than 50 legal size documents. The wealth of information on him astounded me. They even contained a physical description and testimony from his wife and friends. Most of the papers were from when he applied for a small pension that our government started giving out many years after the war. We think government beaurocracy is bad now. It was just as bad way back then. I was amazed at all the hoops he had to jump through to get this tiny amount of money. I sure do treasure those records though and the information that I obtained helped me to trace my roots back many more generations.


30 posted on 12/24/2005 6:49:00 AM PST by Lorraine
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To: Dudoight
Okay, if the War of 1812 ended December 24, 1814, why was there a Battle of New Orleans January 8, 1815?

1. There was no telegraph across the Atlantic to send news of the end of the War. The Treaty of Ghent recognized this by setting up a schedule of dates after which ships seized as prizes of war had to be returned to their owners; it was as late as 180 days after the signature that combat legally ended in the Pacific.

2. The treaty was not ratified until later in 1815 by Congress and Parliament.

3. Neither Jackson nor Pakenham received news of the treaty. Of course, Pakenham never did, having been killed in the assault.
31 posted on 12/24/2005 6:52:21 AM PST by GAB-1955 (being dragged, kicking and screaming, into the Kingdom of Heaven....)
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To: NewLand

Even less than that know our national anthem came from this war.


32 posted on 12/24/2005 12:56:44 PM PST by mainepatsfan
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To: johniegrad

Gosh, I am not being sarcastic and didn't pick up on the last paragraph where the battle was mentioned. I just didn't want that battle left out of the list of encounters. After all, it inspired a popular song! And I remember reading about that battle years ago. If I am not mistaken, Jackson rode to the presidency on that battle!


33 posted on 12/26/2005 4:51:26 AM PST by Dudoight
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