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China Opposes U.S. Sanctions, Demands Trade Ban Lift
AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, BEIJING ^ | December 28, 2005 | Staff author

Posted on 12/28/2005 2:23:05 PM PST by Paul Ross




China Opposes U.S. Sanctions, Demands Trade Ban Lift


China reacted angrily on Dec. 28 to the United States imposing sanctions on six Chinese companies for allegedly supplying Iran with military equipment and technology, demanding the trade bans be lifted.

”We are strongly dissatisfied with and firmly opposed to the U.S. government sanctioning Chinese companies,” the foreign ministry said in a statement.

”The Chinese government has always adopted a serious and responsible attitude on the anti-proliferation issue, and has adopted a series of effective measures to strengthen export management and control.”

The U.S. move was not beneficial to the two countries’ cooperation in the non-proliferation field, the ministry warned.

”We request the United States change this wrongful action,” it said.

The United Sates announced on Tuesday that the six Chinese companies, along with two others from India and one from Austria, had been sanctioned for weapons and technology transfers to Iran.

U.S. State Department spokesman Adam Ereli told reporters the entities were sanctioned based on “credible information” that they transferred equipment and technologies to Iran.

”They are serial offenders,” Ereli said, adding that missile builder China North Industries Corp. (NORINCO) was a repeat offender.

The sanctions, which ban the companies from doing business with the U.S. government and U.S. companies, were based on the Iran Non-Proliferation Act of 2000, which aims at preventing Tehran from developing nuclear weapons.

The United States has accused Iran of seeking to develop nuclear arms under the cover of its civilian nuclear energy program.

NORINCO, a leading Chinese defense industry conglomerate which has had U.S. sanctions placed on it previously, said Wednesday the accusations were groundless and demanded it be allowed to trade freely.

”It is totally baseless and extremely false that the U.S. government has imposed sanctions several times against NORINCO since May 23, 2003, to which we are strongly opposed,” the company said in a statement on its website.

NORINCO said it “strictly” followed the laws and regulations of the Chinese government regarding non-proliferation and “rigorously” complied with applicable international treaties.

The company argued that the ban on trade with U.S. firms should be lifted because such trade has “contributed much” to the U.S. economy.

”We strongly demand that U.S. government repeal all the sanctions against NORINCO, eliminate the negative influence caused by sanctions in a timely fashion and turn the trade and economic ties between two sides back on track and move forward,” the company statement said.

Another Chinese company sanctioned, the public company China National Aero-Technology Import and Export Corporation (Catic), did not make anyone available for comment when contacted by AFP Wednesday.

The other Chinese companies hit were the chemical equipment group Zibo Chemet Equipment Corp., Hongdu Aviation, Ounion International Economic and Technical Cooperative Ltd, and Limmt Metallurgy and Minerals.

They could not be reached for comment.

Two Indian chemical groups were also cited -- Sabero Organics and Sandhya Organics -- as well as Austrian firearms maker Steyr-Mannlicher.

The sanctions took effect December 23.

Weapons proliferation was a sensitive issue in US-China relations but in recent years tensions appear to have eased as the two countries’ trade increases and they step up cooperation in other areas, including convincing North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons program.



TOPICS: Business/Economy; Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; Government; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: china; iran; irannukes; norinco; proliferation; sanctions; scofflaw; serial

1 posted on 12/28/2005 2:23:07 PM PST by Paul Ross
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To: Paul Ross
Well, I guess it's a start.

20,000 more "companies" to go.

2 posted on 12/28/2005 2:31:21 PM PST by Paul Ross (My idea of American policy toward the Soviet Union is simple...It is this, 'We win and they lose.')
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To: Paul Ross

Well if China opposes the sanctions then it can only mean the companies are guilty as sin.


3 posted on 12/28/2005 2:31:38 PM PST by AZRepublican
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To: Paul Ross

Should be interesting to see who backs down.


4 posted on 12/28/2005 2:32:34 PM PST by cripplecreek (Never a minigun handy when you need one.)
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To: Paul Ross
”We strongly demand that U.S. government repeal all the sanctions against NORINCO, eliminate the negative influence caused by sanctions in a timely fashion and turn the trade and economic ties between two sides back on track and move forward,” the company statement said.

Or what?

5 posted on 12/28/2005 2:34:13 PM PST by CAWats (And I will make no distinction between the terrorists and the democrats.)
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To: CAWats
Or what?

They start ordering all those who operate Chinese restaurants back to China I guess! :)

6 posted on 12/28/2005 2:36:28 PM PST by Niuhuru
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To: CAWats
Or what?

They start ordering all those who operate Chinese restaurants back to China I guess! :)

7 posted on 12/28/2005 2:36:43 PM PST by Niuhuru
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To: AZRepublican

And what most of the public doesn't know is that the People's Liberation Army has a stake in ALL Chinese companies, even the ones under foreign ownership.

What that means is that not only did those companies do business with Iran in weapons tech transfer, they did it knowing that the government knew too.


8 posted on 12/28/2005 2:38:41 PM PST by RinaseaofDs
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To: RinaseaofDs

don,t you just Love Free Trade


9 posted on 12/28/2005 2:55:35 PM PST by cope85
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To: Paul Ross
Weapons proliferation was a sensitive issue in US-China relations but in recent years tensions appear to have eased as the two countries’ trade increases and they step up cooperation in other areas, including convincing North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons program.

Too much carrot, not enough stick. The consequence of a nuclear armed North Korea should be a nuclear armed Japan, and we should not stand in their way. If China does not want Japan with nukes she better handle North Korea.
10 posted on 12/28/2005 3:01:17 PM PST by fallujah-nuker (America needs more SAC and less empty sacs.)
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To: Paul Ross
China has never cared about Weapons proliferation, they only care about getting paid.

Iran is no bother to them, and no concern (unless their checks bounce).

Its a very reckless attitude and ignores reality in the favor of greed.

Then china wonders why Japan and India want to beef up their own defences.

11 posted on 12/28/2005 3:02:07 PM PST by Sonny M ("oderint dum metuant")
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To: Sonny M
They are starting to show their true face.....
12 posted on 12/28/2005 3:06:54 PM PST by traumer
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To: traumer

GEOSTRATEGY-DIRECT INTELLIGENCE BRIEF
Russia sells missiles to Sudan, Syria, Libya
Among 7 nations designated by U.S. as state sponsor of terrorism

Posted: September 18, 2002
5:00 p.m. Eastern





The United States has determined that Russia continues to sell missiles and rocket-propelled grenades to such countries as Libya, Sudan and Syria.

The State Department has identified a series of state-owned Russian companies as selling the weapons to the three Arab countries over the last two years. U.S. officials said the Moscow government ignored repeated warnings to halt the sales of the conventional weapons.

Officials said Tula Design Bureau of Instrument Building sold anti-aircraft and anti-tank missiles to Libya, Sudan and Syria. The State Scientific Production Enterprise Bazalt exported grenades. Another company cited was Rostov Airframe Plant 168.

Last week, the State Department announced sanctions on the three Russian companies but avoided penalties on the Russian government. Under the sanctions, the three firms will not be able to trade with the United States.

Industry sources said the sanctions will have no affect on the activities.

Libya, Sudan and Syria are among the seven countries that the United States has designated as state sponsors of terrorism. The others on the State Department list are Cuba, Iran, Iraq and North Korea.

The companies are not the first Russian firms to be sanctioned by the United States. In 1998, the State Department listed several companies linked to the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry for allegedly exporting equipment used for conducting nuclear-weapons tests.

In 1999, 10 additional firms were listed for allegedly transferring sensitive technologies to Iran. Three Russian companies were sanctioned for selling military equipment to Syria.


13 posted on 12/28/2005 3:10:57 PM PST by cope85
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To: Paul Ross


"China reacted angrily on Dec. 28 to the United States imposing sanctions on six Chinese companies for allegedly supplying Iran with military equipment and technology, demanding the trade bans be lifted."

If China feels this way they should impose counter-sanctions. They have this immense economic leverage. Let's see them use it.


14 posted on 12/28/2005 3:13:41 PM PST by strategofr (When the State Department is working for the enemy, it is hard to forge effective foreign policy.)
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To: RinaseaofDs
Indeed... you are correct. This is a slap at the Chinese government. Admittedly, the Chinese have done well in their attempt to deceive the world that communism can work by incorporating 'free market style' business operand. However, in this case, the goose is the gander. It isn't six companies that Uncle Sam is sanctioning.

I've been a 'lurker' for some time now. Just registered and I feel liberated!
15 posted on 12/28/2005 3:14:34 PM PST by mccncc
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To: mccncc

China and Iran Test-Fire Missiles
Charles R. Smith
Friday, Sept. 6, 2002
Against the backdrop of impending military action by the United States against Iraq, China and Iran have recently conducted tests of their own ballistic missile forces.

On Aug. 28, following Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage's visit to Beijing, the People's Liberation Army 2nd Artillery Corps conducted a successful flight test of its Dong Feng (East Wind) 4 missile from a launch site in southern China.

The two-stage Dong Feng 4 limited-range missile was designed initially to hit the U.S. air base at Guam and later modified to increase its range to be able to strike Moscow. The large liquid-fueled missile is armed with an H-bomb warhead equal to 3 million tons of TNT and has a range of over 4,000 miles.

China is estimated to have approximately 20 of the powerful ICBMs, which are capable of striking U.S. military assets in the Asia-Pacific theater, as well as targets in Russia and Europe.

Most of the Dong Feng 4 missiles are stored in tunnels under high mountains, and are launched immediately outside the mouth of the tunnel. The missiles must be moved into the open and fueled prior to firing, an operation dubbed "chu men fang pao" or "shooting a firecracker outside the front door."

PRC Missile Diplomacy

The Chinese missile test was considered by Western intelligence sources to be a signal by Beijing that it will continue to develop, deploy and export missile technology despite a new agreement with the Bush administration on weapons proliferation.

According to a recent report by the U.S.-China Security Review Commission, China is a leading exporter of missile technology. According to the report, Chinese proliferation of weapons, "particularly in the Middle East and Asia," poses a serious threat to the security of the United States.

"China fails to control the export of dual-use items that contribute to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their delivery systems," noted the commission's report, which was published in August.

"China is a leading international source of missile-related technologies," states the report. The report also noted that China has reneged on previous promises and continues to export missile technology to Libya, Iran and Syria.

State Department Denies Visas to Chinese Space Experts

In a move seen as a response to Beijing's missile diplomacy, the U.S. State Department has decided to deny visas to about 20 Chinese space experts invited to attend the World Space Conference in Houston this fall. Over 6,000 scientists, engineers and policy-makers are expected to show up for the space conference scheduled to start in October.

The State Department flagged several members of the Chinese delegation due to "technology-transfer concerns." The word inside Capitol Hill is that the attendees were actually high-ranking military officers from the Chinese Army 2nd Artillery Corps.

North Korea and Iranian Missiles

Meanwhile, Iran also carried out an unsuccessful test of its Shahab-3 missile. The failed test flight from northern Iran occurred late last month. The Shahab missile test reflects ongoing Iranian development of the medium-range rocket, which can strike Israel, Turkey and parts of India.

The Shahab missile is reported to be a derivative of the North Korean No Dong missile. U.S. intelligence sources have accused North Korea of working with Iran for several years to develop the Shahab system.

In a recent speech in South Korea, Under Secretary of State John Bolton labeled Pyongyang "the world's foremost peddler of ballistic missile-related equipment, components, materials, and technical expertise" and a top exporter of missiles to "notable rogue state clients such as Syria, Libya and Iran."

According to Bolton, North Korea's connections with Iran and Iraq, the other countries labeled by President Bush as constituting the "axis of evil," are reason enough to continue sanctions against Pyongyang.

"There is a hard connection between these regimes – an axis along which flow dangerous weapons and dangerous technology," stated Bolton.

Another sign of war in the Middle East comes from Israel. Israel has moved to defend critical targets in case of attack from Iran or Iraq. The Israeli air force has deployed units of U.S.-made Patriot anti-ballistic missiles close to the Dimona nuclear reactor in the south of the country. The Patriots are expected to assist a unit of Arrow anti-ballistic missiles already deployed in southern Israel in the event of retaliatory missile strikes from Baghdad.

U.S. Tomahawk Armed With Directed-Energy Warhead

An additional indication that war with Iraq is in the near future comes with reports that the U.S. Navy is deploying Tomahawk cruise missiles armed with newly developed "directed energy" warheads. Several Navy warships in the Gulf region are armed with the new Tomahawk missiles.

According to U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. John P. Jumper, the strategy to use the new missiles is "in the works."

"You have to coordinate the effects, no matter what forms they take," noted Gen. Jumper. The new Tomahawk missiles are said to be equipped with warheads that produce high-power microwaves. The directed-energy warheads are intended to scramble military computers and destroy sensitive electronics. The most likely targets for the new warheads are Iraq's Chinese-made air defense system and Iraqi chemical storage facilities.


16 posted on 12/28/2005 3:18:21 PM PST by cope85
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To: mccncc

UK 'sells' bomb material to Iran


DTI is accused of approving controversial exports

British officials have approved the export of key components needed to make nuclear weapons to Iran and other countries known to be developing such weapons.
An investigation by BBC Radio 4 programme File on Four will disclose that the Department of Trade and Industry allowed a quantity of the metal, Beryllium, to be sold to Iran last year.

That metal is needed to make nuclear bombs.

Britain has had an arms embargo to Iran since 1993 and has signed up to an international protocol which bans the sale of Beryllium to named countries, including Iran.

MP's concerns

Liberal Democrat foreign affairs spokesman, Menzies Campbell, who has been alerted to the BBC programme's material, is said to be extremely alarmed.

Beryllium is a metal with a limited number of high-tech uses in civilian industry, but is mostly used in defence applications and is a vital component in a nuclear bomb.

The programme has also interviewed a leading nuclear weapons expert in the UK who says that the Beryllium and other items which the DTI has licensed to Iran add up to a shopping list for a nuclear weapons programme.

The UK has an arms embargo against Iran, but not a trade embargo.


Export control weaknesses

The programme highlights the weaknesses in the UK's new export control system, which was set up to stop the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

It will reveal that Iranian procurement agents have been working in the UK to get sensitive material back to Iran, and that Pakistan has also been successful in procuring material for its nuclear programme from here.

It is also likely to cause concern among Britain's allies.

President Bush named Iran as part of an "axis of evil" accusing the Iranian regime of sponsoring terrorism.


17 posted on 12/28/2005 3:23:30 PM PST by cope85
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To: cope85

THe sad thing is the ones we catch are probably only the tip of the iceberg.


18 posted on 12/28/2005 4:38:39 PM PST by rodguy911 (Support Able Danger and Lt.Col Shaffer,Condi Rice/VP in 08--)
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To: RinaseaofDs

Which is why China is wailing. Slapping these Chinese companies is a direct slap to the "image" of the Chinese Government as a "friend" of free and developed countries.

Until now they've been getting a free pass while they supply Iran, supply North Korea, support fledging communist governments across the Globe, make deals with Russia etc...

If they were a peaceful ally they'd strip NK of nuclear weapons and support regime change in Iran.


19 posted on 12/28/2005 6:42:49 PM PST by Soul Seeker (Mr. President: It is now time to turn over the money changers' tables.)
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To: mccncc

Welcome to Free Republic. I can't tell you how good this place is going to make you feel.

This is some of the most reliable reporting there is. You are also going to find some of the smartest people in the world here, and I don't include myself in that particular category either.

You're also going to find some of the best connected people here as well.

Enjoy yourself, and welcome.


20 posted on 12/28/2005 11:04:11 PM PST by RinaseaofDs
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To: mccncc
Bump.

Welcome aboard!

21 posted on 12/29/2005 7:52:56 AM PST by Paul Ross (My idea of American policy toward the Soviet Union is simple...It is this, 'We win and they lose.')
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To: Paul Ross

"The U.S. move was not beneficial to the two countries’ cooperation in the non-proliferation field, the ministry warned."

Stop arming the Islamic regime, you commie dorks. That is what non-proliferation means.


22 posted on 12/29/2005 7:06:36 PM PST by sagar
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