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The Radioactive Boy Scout
http://www.qsl.net/n9zia/radio_scout ^ | KEN SILVERSTEIN

Posted on 12/29/2005 1:45:14 PM PST by Wonder Warthog

Golf Manor, a subdivision in Commerce Township, Mich., some 25 miles outside of Detroit, is the kind of place where nothing unusual is supposed to happen, where the only thing lurking around the corner is an ice-cream truck. But June 26, 1995, was not a typical day.

Ask Dottie Pease. Cruising down Pinto Drive, Pease saw half a dozen men crossing her neighbor's lawn. Three, in respirators and white moon suits, were dismantling her next-door neighbor's shed with electric saws, stuffing the pieces into large steel drums emblazoned with radioactive warning signs.

Huddled with a group of neighbors, Pease was nervous. "I was pretty disturbed," she recalls. Publicly, the employees of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that day said there was nothing to fear. The truth is far more bizarre: the shed was dangerously irradiated and, according to the EPA, up to 40,000 residents of the area could be at risk.

The cleanup was provoked by the boy next door, David Hahn. He had attempted to build a nuclear reactor in his mother's shed following a Boy Scout merit-badge project.

Grander Ambitions

David Hahn's early years were seemingly ordinary. The blond, gangly boy played baseball and soccer, and joined the Boy Scouts. His parents, Ken and Patty, had divorced, and David lived with his father and stepmother, Kathy, in nearby Clinton Township. He spent weekends in Golf Manor with his mother and her boyfriend, Michael Polasek.

An abrupt change came at age ten, when Kathy's father gave David The Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments. David became immersed. By age 12 he had digested his father's college chemistry textbooks; by 14 he had made nitroglycerin.

One night his house in Clinton Township was rocked by an explosion in the basement. Ken and Kathy found David semiconscious on the floor. He had been pounding some substance with a screwdriver and ignited it. He was rushed to the hospital to have his eyes flushed.

Kathy then forbade David from experimenting in her home. So he shifted his operations to his mother's shed in Golf Manor. Neither Patty nor Michael had any idea what the shy teenager was up to, although they thought it was odd that David often wore a mask in the shed, and would sometimes discard his clothing after working there until two in the morning. They chalked it up to their own limited education.

Michael does, however, remember David saying, "One of these days we're gonna run out of oil."

Convinced he needed discipline, David's father, Ken, felt the solution lay in a goal that he didn't himself achieve, Eagle Scout, which requires 21 merit badges. David earned a merit badge in Atomic Energy in May 1991, five months shy of his 15th birthday. By now, though, he had grander ambitions.

Concocted identity

He was determined to irradiate anything he could, and decided to build a neutron "gun." To obtain radioactive materials, David used a number of cover stories and concocted a new identity.

He wrote to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), claiming to be a physics instructor at Chippewa Valley High School. The agency's director of isotope production and distribution, Donald Erb, offered him tips on isolating and obtaining radioactive elements, and explained the characteristics of some isotopes, which, when bombarded with neutrons, can sustain a chain reaction.

When David asked about the risks, Erb assured him that the "dangers are very slight," since "possession of any radioactive materials in quantities and forms sufficient to pose any hazard is subject to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (or equivalent) licensing."

David learned that a tiny amount of the radioactive isotope americium-241 could be found in smoke detectors. he contacted smoke-detector companies and claimed that he needed a large number for a school project. One company sold him about a hundred broken detectors for a dollar apiece.

Not sure where the americium was located, he wrote to an electronics firm in Illinois. A customer-service representative wrote back to say she'd be happy to help out with "your report." Thanks to her help, David extracted the material. He put the americium inside a hollow block of lead with a tiny hole pricked in one side so that alpha rays would stream out. In front of the block he placed a sheet of aluminum, its atoms absorb alpha rays and kick out neutrons. His neutron gun was ready.

The mantle in gas lanterns, the small cloth pouch over the flame, is coated with a compound containing thorium-232. When bombarded with neutrons it produces uranium-233, which is fissionable. David bought thousands of lantern mantles from surplus stores and blowtorched them into a pile of ash.

To isolate the thorium from the ash, he purchased $1000 worth of lithium batteries and cut them in half with wire cutters. He placed the lithium and thorium ash together in a ball of aluminum foil and heated the ball with a Bunsen burner. This purified the thorium to at least 9000 times the level found in nature, and up to 170 times the level that requires NRC licensing. But David's americium gun wasn't strong enough to transform thorium into uranium.

More Help From the NRC

David held a series of after-school jobs at fast-food joints, grocery stores and furniture warehouses, but work was merely a means of financing his experiments. Never an enthusiastic student, he fell behind in school, scoring poorly on state math and reading tests (he did, however, ace the test in science).

Wanting radium for a new gun, David began visiting junkyards and antique stores in search of radium-coated clocks. He'd chip paint from them and collect it.

It was slow going until one day, while driving through Clinton Township, he says he came across an old table clock in an antique shop. In the hack of the clock he discovered a vial of radium paint. He bought the clock for $10.

Next he concentrated the radium and dried it into a salt form. Whether he fully realized it or not, he was putting himself in danger.

The NRC's Erb had told him that "nothing produces neutrons from alpha reactions as well as beryllium." David says he had a friend swipe a strip of beryllium from a chemistry lab, then placed it in front of the lead block that held the radium. His cute little americium gun was now a more powerful radium gun.

David had located some pitchblende, an ore containing tiny amounts of uranium, and pulverized it with a hammer. He aimed the gun at the powder, hoping to produce at least some fissionable atoms. It didn't work. The neutron particles, the bullets in his gun, were moving too fast.

To slow them down, he added a filter, then targeted his gun again. This time the uranium powder appeared to grow more radioactive by the day.

"Imminent Danger"

Now 17, David hit on the idea of building a model breeder reactor, a nuclear reactor that not only generates electricity, but also produces new fuel. His model would use the actual radioactive elements and produce real reactions. His blueprint was a schematic in one of his father's textbooks.

Ignoring safety, David mixed his radium and americium with beryllium and aluminum, all of which he wrapped in aluminum foil, forming a makeshift reactor core. He surrounded this radioactive ball with a blanket of small foil-wrapped cubes of thorium ash and uranium powder, tenuously held together with duct tape.

"It was radioactive as heck," David says, "far greater than at the time of assembly." Then he began to realize that he could be putting himself and others in danger.

When David's Geiger counter began picking up radiation five doors from his mom's house, he decided that he had "too much radioactive stuff in one place" and began to disassemble the reactor. He hid some of the material in his mother's house, left some in the shed, and packed most of the rest into the trunk of his Pontiac.

At 2:40 a.m. on August 31, 1994, Clinton Township police responded to a call concerning a young man who had been apparently stealing tires from a car. When the police arrived, David told them he was meeting a friend. Unconvinced, officers decided to search his car.

They opened the trunk and discovered a toolbox shut with a padlock and sealed with duct tape. The trunk also contained foil-wrapped cubes of mysterious gray powder, small disks and cylindrical metal objects, and mercury switches. The police were especially alarmed by the toolbox, which David said was radioactive and which they feared was an atomic bomb.

The discovery eventually triggered the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, and state officials would become involved in consultations with the EPA and NRC.

At the shed, radiological experts found an aluminum pie pan, a Pyrex cup, a milk crate and other materials strewn about, contaminated at up to 1000 times the normal levels of background radiation. Because some of this could be moved around by wind and rain, conditions at the site, according to an EPA memo, "present an imminent endangerment to public health."

After the moon-suited workers dismantled the shed, they loaded the remains into 39 sealed barrels that were trucked to the Great Salt Lake Desert. There, the remains of David's experiments were entombed with other radioactive debris.

"These are conditions that regulations never envision," says Dave Minnaar, radiological expert with Michigan's Department of Environmental Quality. "It's simply presumed that the average person wouldn't have the technology or materials required to experiment in these areas."

David Hahn is now in the Navy, where he reads about steroids, melanin, genetic codes, prototype reactors, amino acids and criminal law. "I wanted to make a scratch in life," he explains now. "I've still got time." Of his exposure to radioactivity he says, "I don't believe I took more than five years off my life."


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Technical
KEYWORDS: boyscout; boyscouts; bsa; bsalist; science
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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Hmmm--an abitious little bugger, wasn't he.
1 posted on 12/29/2005 1:45:15 PM PST by Wonder Warthog
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To: Wonder Warthog

n oldie, but a goodie....


2 posted on 12/29/2005 1:46:44 PM PST by freebilly
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To: Wonder Warthog

Somebody needs to give that guy a good job and a good education. Not many kids with the know-how, interest and smarts to do that. He could be the next Einstein, Teller or Oppenhiemer.


3 posted on 12/29/2005 1:50:42 PM PST by Redcitizen (My tagline can beat up your honor tagline)
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To: Redcitizen

Navy has a lot of nukes.


4 posted on 12/29/2005 1:53:41 PM PST by patton ("Hard Drive Cemetary" - forthcoming best seller)
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To: Wonder Warthog

Interesting article. A couple of miles from home. Thanks for posting.


5 posted on 12/29/2005 1:54:11 PM PST by PGalt
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To: Wonder Warthog

I always wondered what happened to him.


6 posted on 12/29/2005 1:55:27 PM PST by kingu
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To: Wonder Warthog

Scarey. Why couldn't some homegrown America-hating Jihadist baddies make a dirty bomb with some of the same materials?


7 posted on 12/29/2005 1:55:44 PM PST by billndin
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To: Wonder Warthog

Wow! Who'da thunk it?


8 posted on 12/29/2005 1:56:12 PM PST by Fiddlstix (Tagline Repair Service. Let us fix those broken Taglines. Inquire within(Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: Redcitizen

More like an Edison or a Graham. But he definitely needs a workshop...


9 posted on 12/29/2005 1:58:23 PM PST by Little Ray (I'm a reactionary, hirsute, gun-owning, knuckle dragging, Christian Neanderthal and proud of it!)
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To: Wonder Warthog
"It's simply presumed that the average person wouldn't have the technology or materials required to experiment in these areas."

The "average person" is more inventive than government or academia.
.
10 posted on 12/29/2005 1:59:16 PM PST by mugs99 (Don't take life too seriously, you won't get out alive.)
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To: Wonder Warthog

Damn.. what a story. And we thought Three Mile Island was a bit of a bother.


11 posted on 12/29/2005 2:00:34 PM PST by xcamel (a system poltergeist stole it.)
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To: Wonder Warthog

Now, Imagine what a scientist in an oil-rich Mid-Eastern county can do despite 12 years of UN sanctions...


12 posted on 12/29/2005 2:00:53 PM PST by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
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To: Wonder Warthog

Depending on his exposure level, he may have increased his life expectancy. Statistics have shown that the effects of radiation exposure graph out in the shape of a "J", with a small amount being beneficial, and with increases becoming more beneficial before beoming less beneficial and then beoming harmful.


13 posted on 12/29/2005 2:01:02 PM PST by Jeff Chandler (Peace Begins in the Womb)
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To: Right Wing Professor; Physicist

Holy crap! Ping to a coupl'a fellas who might be interested.


14 posted on 12/29/2005 2:03:49 PM PST by TheBigB (Never banned or suspended even once! Ask me how!)
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To: Wonder Warthog

ping


15 posted on 12/29/2005 2:03:51 PM PST by trailboss800
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To: Wonder Warthog

I hope the terrorists do not read this article.


16 posted on 12/29/2005 2:13:20 PM PST by mountainlyons (Merry CHRISTMAS AND HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!)
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To: TheBigB

http://hps.org/publicinformation/ate/q3501.html


17 posted on 12/29/2005 2:14:49 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
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To: mountainlyons; Wonder Warthog
I hope the terrorists do not read this article

Nothing that is not known in any basic nuclear engineering text book. See my link on the viability of producing an effective device using this method.

18 posted on 12/29/2005 2:16:23 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
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To: Wonder Warthog

I read that book last year, quite an interesting story.

You can do a lot with a few hundred chips of americanium from smoke detectors and a few thousand lantern mantles.


19 posted on 12/29/2005 2:17:21 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Won't you eat my sleazy pancakes, just for Saintly Alfonzo)
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To: Wonder Warthog

Another one of those "Don't try this at home" threads.


20 posted on 12/29/2005 2:23:40 PM PST by Ditto ( No trees were killed in sending this message, but billions of electrons were inconvenienced.)
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To: Central Scrutiniser
few thousand lantern mantles.

The new ones no longer contain Thorium. I used to use lantern mantles to test my scintillator until I bought a Cesium 137 source. :-)

21 posted on 12/29/2005 2:25:39 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
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To: Central Scrutiniser

Unfortunately the book was written by some liberal luddite bastard. The moral of the story seems to have been "science is bad".


22 posted on 12/29/2005 2:27:55 PM PST by ClaudiusI
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To: Central Scrutiniser
FYI, You can buy all kinds of radioactive sources thru the mail.

I bought a Cs137, Co60, and a Sr90 test kit this way.

23 posted on 12/29/2005 2:29:13 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
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To: ClaudiusI

It was still a good story.

What is scary is all the girls that worked in clock factories that would paint their nails with the radium paint, or put it on their teeth as a joke.

They didn't laugh too long.


24 posted on 12/29/2005 2:30:18 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Won't you eat my sleazy pancakes, just for Saintly Alfonzo)
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To: RadioAstronomer

I have some deuterium and tritium in my swimming pool.

At least a few molecules.


25 posted on 12/29/2005 2:30:59 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Won't you eat my sleazy pancakes, just for Saintly Alfonzo)
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To: Wonder Warthog

ping


26 posted on 12/29/2005 2:31:18 PM PST by PioneerDrive (Don't fence me in.)
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To: Wonder Warthog

The Golden Book of Chemistry Experiments is going for hundreds of dollars now.


27 posted on 12/29/2005 2:32:39 PM PST by King Moonracer
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To: Wonder Warthog
If the Radioactive Boy Scout hooks up with this kid, we need a heads up.
28 posted on 12/29/2005 2:34:30 PM PST by numberonepal (Don't Even Think About Treading On Me)
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To: Wonder Warthog

bump


29 posted on 12/29/2005 2:34:46 PM PST by VOA
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To: Wonder Warthog

"I wonder if this will get me a merit badge..."

30 posted on 12/29/2005 2:35:08 PM PST by WestVirginiaRebel (The Democratic Party-Jackass symbol, jackass leaders, jackass supporters.)
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To: Redcitizen
He could be the next Einstein, Teller or Oppenhiemer.

Not if some public school official got to him with some Ritalin.
31 posted on 12/29/2005 2:35:42 PM PST by VOA
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To: Central Scrutiniser

Deuterium you can purchase thru the mails as well. :-)

Tritium is found in many items such as illuminated watch hands.

In fact, you can purchase sealed borosilicate vials that contains Tritium inside a phosphor coating that will glow for 30 years. People use them for scuba diving and on key rings.


32 posted on 12/29/2005 2:36:06 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
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To: RadioAstronomer
"FYI, You can buy all kinds of radioactive sources thru the mail."

Yeah, but I'll bet they would look at you a bit askance if you asked'em to ship a thousand or so to the same address.

But, 'tis true--anyone can buy any isotope in "General License Quantities".

33 posted on 12/29/2005 2:36:31 PM PST by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel)
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To: Jeff Chandler
Depending on his exposure level, he may have increased his life expectancy.

Yep.
This effect even gets mentioned at mandatory Radiation Safety lectures
at UCLA.
34 posted on 12/29/2005 2:37:43 PM PST by VOA
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To: RadioAstronomer

I've seen the scuba stuff with tritium.

I go the low tech route for when I do night dives. I go to the dollar store and buy a bunch of those glow in the dark cylume plastic halloween things.

Just before entering the water, I give everyone a different color, break the vial inside and activate them, and that way, I know who is who underwater and if a flashlight breaks down, we know where that person is.


35 posted on 12/29/2005 2:41:53 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Won't you eat my sleazy pancakes, just for Saintly Alfonzo)
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To: Central Scrutiniser

You and me both. :-)

I don't do many night dives anymore. Not much to see. However, have you ever lit up coral with a UV light? Pretty cool.


36 posted on 12/29/2005 2:43:35 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
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To: Wonder Warthog
but I'll bet they would look at you a bit askance

LOL! Yuppers!

37 posted on 12/29/2005 2:44:57 PM PST by RadioAstronomer (Senior member of Darwin Central)
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To: RadioAstronomer

That could be fun.

I might be going for my masters and instructor soon, got a free place to stay in the Carribean.

I just like how every once in a while you completely suprise a fish at night and they freak out. What I don't like are groupers and butterfly fish that always follow you about 2 feet behind your shoulder when you dive at night.

Best night dive to do is the Kona manta ray dives, they bring down a huge amount of lights to a spot off shore where a hotel light has been shining for years. Then you sit on the bottom and get about 5 or 6 mantas, each about 6 ft wide and 3 feet long.


38 posted on 12/29/2005 2:48:09 PM PST by Central Scrutiniser (Won't you eat my sleazy pancakes, just for Saintly Alfonzo)
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Comment #39 Removed by Moderator

To: VOA
This effect even gets mentioned at mandatory Radiation Safety lectures at UCLA.

You mean I was right? I wasn't sure if I actually read that somewhere, or if it was the cold medicine talking.

40 posted on 12/29/2005 3:26:31 PM PST by Jeff Chandler (Peace Begins in the Womb)
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To: RadioAstronomer

I used to turn off the dive lights and enjoy the natural phosphorescnence. A reef looks like a miniature city.


41 posted on 12/29/2005 3:32:43 PM PST by Jeff Chandler (Peace Begins in the Womb)
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To: RadioAstronomer
The new ones no longer contain Thorium. I used to use lantern mantles to test my scintillator until I bought a Cesium 137 source. :-)

The saddest part of the story was his ignorance of the basics that could have had him doing a better job.

For example, the old Coleman mantles are treated with thorium nitrate, which could have been rinsed out and concentrated with water. Once fired, the ThO2 is formed. This is also true of the modern yttrium mantles. He did not have to ash them, thereby causing so much dilution. Nuclear reactions do not care about the compound, unless it contains neutron absorbing elements like cadmium.

If he wanted an alpha source, raiding Staticmaster brushes would have been much more rewarding. A milligram of polonium emits as many alpha particles per second as 5 grams of radium. The energy released by its decay is so large that a capsule containing about 0.5 grams reaches a temperature above 500K. Since a->Be>-oN1 only has a yield of 1 in 10^4 or so, the higher alpha flux from Polonium would have greatly helped him.

In short, it was a bungled and pathetic effort, that could have been vastly improved with a half an hour on the Web.

"C" for effort, "F" for Style.

42 posted on 12/29/2005 3:43:09 PM PST by Gorzaloon
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To: Army Air Corps

What it goes to show is that American boy scouts are smarter than all the scientists in the middle east.


43 posted on 12/29/2005 4:00:20 PM PST by Sentis
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To: PGalt
A couple of miles from home

You're almost in my back yard.........

44 posted on 12/29/2005 4:04:01 PM PST by Hot Tabasco (If I get socks again this year from my sis and bro-in-law I'm going to be really mad....)
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To: billndin

Any idiot could make a dirty bomb if they could get the radioactive material.


45 posted on 12/29/2005 4:16:46 PM PST by lesser_satan
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To: Hot Tabasco

Gotta get together.


46 posted on 12/29/2005 10:24:37 PM PST by PGalt
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To: Gorzaloon
For example, the old Coleman mantles are treated with thorium nitrate, which could have been rinsed out and concentrated with water. Once fired, the ThO2 is formed. This is also true of the modern yttrium mantles. He did not have to ash them, thereby causing so much dilution.

The water would release the Th from the Th(NO3)4? (Assuming Th valence of 4)

47 posted on 12/29/2005 10:35:56 PM PST by HiTech RedNeck
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To: Ditto

Then there is the EMP gun.....salvage a CRT tube from an old TV, knock off all the glass and replace it with a shielded tube, and set up a capacitor with a solid state relay to power......

"That's all I got to say about that.", Forrest Gump.

Once upon a time a dude I know of made himself sick with a similar device he built. He didn't understand why he got sick, but once the hospital figured it out he got a visit from.....weeelllll...he ain't supposed to do that no more.

It is a quick and silent method to kill rats at the local dump, however.

I guess the Department of Homeland Security is coming to lobotomize me now, or the Defense Department will be hiring me as a consultant.


48 posted on 12/29/2005 10:44:38 PM PST by 308MBR (Not only older, but bolder. Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.)
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To: RadioAstronomer

Leave my night sights alone.


49 posted on 12/29/2005 10:46:17 PM PST by 308MBR (Not only older, but bolder. Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.)
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To: Wonder Warthog

And all we did when we were kids was patiently use a pin to pick the gunpowder out of toy caps until we had enough to make a giant firecracker.


50 posted on 12/29/2005 10:47:38 PM PST by Age of Reason
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