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High-Def Is the Word at Electronics Show
The Associated Press ^ | Jan 7 | GARY GENTILE

Posted on 01/07/2006 8:08:19 PM PST by george76

The wraps came off high-definition DVD players at this year's annual Consumer Electronics Show, offering the final component to replicate the movie theater experience at home.

And while a fierce DVD format war likely will delay the mass adoption of such devices, digital video is here to stay - the Consumer Electronics Association trade group estimates 25 million U.S. homes will have a high-def TV set by year's end.

But big, expensive flat-panel sets aside, this year's gadget show offered plenty of smaller screens for video...

Yahoo Inc., DirecTV, Starz Entertainment Group and Sony were also among the companies getting deeper into the business of trying to make it simple to watch recorded Hollywood movies, home video and even live streaming television wherever you may be, on all manner of device.

Not to be outdone, radio was out in force as well, including palm-sized satellite receivers that hold hours of recorded music.

Digital radios, which promise a high-definition listening experience from traditional earth-bound stations, were also on display as that service begins a wider national rollout this year.

- The Inno, a portable combination XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. receiver/MP3 player with 1 gigabyte of internal memory.

- Several new handheld video options included the Gigabeat player from Toshiba, one of a series of devices running Microsoft Corp.'s portable media center software.

(Excerpt) Read more at hosted.ap.org ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: 1080p; 1080pdlp; 1080pdlphdtv; comcast; consumerelectronics; crt; digitalradios; digitalvideo; directv; dlp; drm; dvd; flatpanelsets; gigabeatplayer; hd; hddvd; hdtv; hewletpackard; highdefinition; highdeftv; hollyweird; hollywood; homevideo; hp; lasvegas; lcd; microsoft; movies; mp3player; plasma; radio; samsung; samsunghddvd; sony; starzentertainment; theinno; toshiba; whocares; xmsatelliteradio; yahoo
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1 posted on 01/07/2006 8:08:21 PM PST by george76
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To: george76
I've been playing the HDTV "game" for about three years now.

Primarily by way of Dish Network and their fine line of HDTV receivers. It's truly an amazing bit of technology and it has scared the pants off Hollywood knowing that Joe and Jane Doakes can have real Movie quality pictures and sound in their living room.

Well, I just purchased my latest and most expensive HD receiver from Dish on 12/5/2005. And guess what? It's now obsolete. Dish announced at the CES mentioned above that it was changing the standard which they use to compress the HD signal from MPEG-2 to MPEG-4. And guess what? My one-month old $xxx.xx Dish 942 HD receiver can't receive MPEG-4. Even though I was told it could be "upgraded" by a software download. It can't. So, no new HD for me.

But, nil desperandum, Dish will sell me a new one that will receive MPEG-4!

For $xxx.xx, more.

But, I won't be buying, I'm resigning my HDTV license until they work this stuff out.

2 posted on 01/07/2006 8:38:15 PM PST by TommyUdo (The De-Looks Shore Dinner)
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To: george76

Yup. And my two high definition TVs won't work with any of these new players because they don't support the DRM'd crap inputs. And I don't plan on spending several thousand dollars on new HD TVs anytime soon. I'll pass.


3 posted on 01/07/2006 8:41:37 PM PST by sigSEGV
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To: TommyUdo

Thank you for the information.

I have been watching and waiting for the dust to settle.

Looks like I need to wait some more.


4 posted on 01/07/2006 8:55:25 PM PST by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76
Haven't had any problems so far. HDTV and cable and a HTPC. The video quality is stunning as well as AC3 surround audio. Satellite is probably different since you have to buy the box.

Have created a couple of HD slide shows, too and have an HD camera. Stunning as well.

Most local stations broadcast in HD including the recent football games, eg, the Rose Bowl. Definitely worth it to watch a game in HD. And comcast offer four additional HD stations as well as each of the premium stations (HBO, Stars, etc.) offering at least one HD station.

Still in it infancy but well on its way and well worth it IMHO.
5 posted on 01/07/2006 9:00:28 PM PST by dhs12345
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To: george76
I didn't include the punchline.

Sadly, Dish is STILL, today, right now, activating these soon-to-be deficient receivers for NEW accounts.

"Yes, I know you just signed up to receive Dish HDTV. No, you can't get these new channels--which include YOUR LOCAL stations in HDTV. Unless, of course, you want to send me some more money..."

Man, I wouldn't want to be working in the Dish Network "Customer Service" shop when this stuff hits the fan.

6 posted on 01/07/2006 9:00:40 PM PST by TommyUdo (The De-Looks Shore Dinner)
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To: george76
Cable may be a better option. Depends on where you are of course. Outlying cities are less supported than large cities.

Well worth it in my opinion.

HDTVs: always getting better. Mine is a 720p which is more than adequate for my viewing. New ones are 1080p. Actually, feeding the TV with a progressive scan DVD player and video quality is very good -- difficult to tell the difference between broadcast HD and SD progressive.

Very happy.
7 posted on 01/07/2006 9:08:20 PM PST by dhs12345
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To: sigSEGV

The signal looks so good in the stores.

But, I do not want to buy another problem.


8 posted on 01/07/2006 9:10:46 PM PST by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76

Who cares? They're trying to rig everything where you can't record it, or without having to pay. Can you imagine having to pay every time you pop a tape you bought into the VCR?

To hell with Hollyweird.


9 posted on 01/07/2006 9:16:18 PM PST by JoJo Gunn (Help control the Leftist population. Have them spayed or neutered. )
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To: george76
Yup. They are selling a product.

Actually, the signal in the store I bought from was pretty bad. The fed each of the TVs SD content which doesn't look great on a large screen. Had to get the salesman to switch to HD. Also, they set up each of the TVs to stretch the 4:3 SD stations to fit the widescreen format of the TV. This looks goofy.

I work in this field and have had a lot of opportunity to "play" with different equipment. DLP TVs are the best right now, IMO. Plasma, too expensive; LCD, screen door effect.
10 posted on 01/07/2006 9:22:05 PM PST by dhs12345
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To: george76

Do I really need a hi-def DVD player in order to reproduce the poor focus, frame-flutter and giant-hair-in-the-projector experience of my local theater?


11 posted on 01/07/2006 9:24:21 PM PST by Petronski (I love Cyborg!)
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To: dhs12345

What is your opinion on this...

" if you buy an lcd tv and intend on using it with a pc, be aware that many do not support 1024x768 resolution -- they support 1024x760.


"Why they left off 8 lines is beyond me."

Because they are designed to support the High Definition TV standard of 760p - the computer functionality is just an added plus.

"Better to hold out for a display that supports HD at 1080p - they cost more, but look better. And for a 27" computer monitor, I'd want to achieve a much higher resolution than 1024x768."



12 posted on 01/07/2006 9:24:33 PM PST by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76

I LOVE my HDTV!!!!!

You'll have to pry it out of my cold dead hands......

Obviously not for the faint of heart, but a good set with a good signal, surround system, progressive DVD player, and decent HDTV source material--I mainly use OTA broadcasts, which are good in my area--and you're in Sofa Spud Heaven.


13 posted on 01/07/2006 9:44:51 PM PST by moonhawk (Democrats are to "Diversity and Tolerance" as Islam is to "Peace.")
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To: TommyUdo

I too have been in the HDTV game for some 3+ years.
First with DirecTV...then VOOM...now Comcast Cable.

My advice for newbies looking to jump in is to go with your local cable offering. With cable there is no threat of buying a box that will be obsolete in 6 months. Just pay the $10 monthly rental fee and swap out boxes whenever there is a glitch or a new and better box becomes available.

Plus you can cancel at any time.
Try that with DirecTV or Dish.

As for TV's...I think the best picture for the buck right now (considering size)is LCD rear projection.
Picture Quality approaches that of a top notch CRT and is available up to 50" +.

I am currently looking at the Sony 50" LCD RPT.
Great picture for under $2k

Just my 2 cents...
;-)


14 posted on 01/07/2006 9:49:09 PM PST by ptlurking
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To: dhs12345

Don't forget FOX is pushing to have 24 all in HD this year (season starts on on the 15th).

Cool thing is they are playing all 24 episodes in 24 weeks... don't see that too often these days of 'mid season' BS


15 posted on 01/07/2006 9:52:36 PM PST by FreedomNeocon (I'm in no Al-Samood for this Shi'ite.)
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To: george76
Two differnt standards:

TV standard and PC. Newer video cards that support HD also allow for adjusting over-scan while using PC as a PC or the PC as an HD player. There is software available to do the same. Note: your generic video card may not immediately support HD. And HD MPEG2 or wmv conversion takes a bit of cpu horsepower.


Wait for 1080p. Agreed. However, 1080p is kind of pricey right now. Probably another year before it comes down. Also, new TVs have built in over the air HD tuners so all that is required is an antenna and you will be able to pick up the over the air HD broadcast. Of course, you have to be reasonably close to the transmitter to pick up the broadcast. Remember the days of rabbit ears? They are back (or cable or satellite is another option).
16 posted on 01/07/2006 9:53:38 PM PST by dhs12345
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To: FreedomNeocon

Yes. Pretty cool. Approx 74% of the local (network) shows come through in HD (in my area; Denver Metro).

Have been avoiding the networks because of the anti-Conservative content. Been watching them more since they have converted their shows over to HD. Not a big fan of shows like "Stacked" etc. But have been flipping through them just for the picture. Surface was pretty good, too.


17 posted on 01/07/2006 10:01:29 PM PST by dhs12345
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To: george76

Sony's Playstation 3 will play hi-def Blu-ray dvds next Spring. And the games...


18 posted on 01/07/2006 10:05:47 PM PST by Sender ("I am ready with my candies and my rockets..." -Allahu Fubar-)
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To: dhs12345
Forgot to mention: they also support cable cards (allows the TV to play Cable without a cable box).

The HD ota tuner is nice and I guess cable card support is nice too. However, both add cost to the TV.

So, in addition to the additional cost of the higher res TV, you will be paying for a tuner and cable card. You probably wont use the latter two.
19 posted on 01/07/2006 10:08:02 PM PST by dhs12345
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To: dhs12345

What is your view on plasma, LCD, etc. ?

Living at 5000 feet and above...does Plasma, etc. have issues?


20 posted on 01/07/2006 10:14:09 PM PST by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76
Here's a post made on 12/30/05 regarding my recent purchase of a Samsung HD-DVD 850 unit for any FReepers considering such:

***

I ended up reading a lot of the review and performance comparisons. In the end I decided the 850 was sufficient for my needs. I ended up buying it at Brandsmart last night for $138 (versus $134 plus delivery at Newegg.)

We hooked it up in minutes using the HDMI and Standard jacks for sound as I didn't have the digital audio wire. We kept the old unit in place for comparison. We played the old standby "Star Wars IV" as a benchmark between the two units.

The difference was immediately apparent. We had set the HD DVD to a setting of 1920 * 1080. The lines that used to digitally blur on the star destroyer in the opening scene were obvious in the old unit, but completely softened and removed in the new HD DVD unit. The clarity was excellent, although I did notice more of a "halo affect" on the opening text in the movie. The text was also noticeably softened and smooth out. No more rough or digitally boxy edges.

That made all the difference I needed. The Samsung is perfect for me.

There are many additional features that allow you to select definition modes and screen size for the movies. Very nice, especially since the option on the television doesn't always fit the DVD feature so that you can see subtitles when you want them. For the price, I don't think you can go wrong. Just thought I'd share and hope this helps some.

21 posted on 01/08/2006 4:17:32 AM PST by Caipirabob (Democrats.. Socialists..Commies..Traitors...Who can tell the difference?)
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To: george76

After RESEARCH I bought the Panasonic 50" Plasma. (50PX50U) HD w/the best resolution around.

Has HDMI too - a single cable carrying audio and video from your receiver to the TV. DVD's, receivers, DVR's and even Satellite receivers are available with HDMI - no more cable spagetti.

It was known for all of 2005 that Dish Network was going to upgrade to HD w/4 MPEG receiver in the first part of 2006.

If I am going to spend thousands of dollars on a plasma or for those who spend a few hundred on a Satellite Dish I'd recommend doing some research first - try CNET as a starter for news and reviews.

Knowledge is your friend and can save you beaucoup dollars in the long run.

happydogx2


22 posted on 01/08/2006 6:32:23 AM PST by happydogx2 (Let Freedom Reign!!)
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To: george76

My 50" panny does not have "issues" and I'm a 4500 feet.

I don't think it's how high the elevation is - it depends upon how high you are. :)

happydogx2


23 posted on 01/08/2006 6:34:54 AM PST by happydogx2 (Let Freedom Reign!!)
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To: george76

I have heard that people at 6000 (Tahoe) have troubles, and those at 5000 may be fine.


24 posted on 01/08/2006 8:57:08 AM PST by Atlas Sneezed (Your FRiendly FReeper Patent Attorney)
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To: TommyUdo

IMHO, the Westinghouse 37" LCD is the best set for cable or sat use. At under $1800, it is true 1080P and looks great!

See
http://soundandvisionmag.pricegrabber.com/search_getprod.php/masterid=9154017/fd=1/zip_code=27517/sort_type=bottomline


25 posted on 01/08/2006 9:03:57 AM PST by Andy from Chapel Hill
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To: george76
I prefer the dlp. Best value IMO. However, it is best that you to compare at the store.

Plasma = too expensive versus value

LCD = annoying screen door effect.

dlp = off angle viewing issues. However, mine okay at approx 120 deg
26 posted on 01/08/2006 11:42:07 AM PST by dhs12345
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To: dhs12345; All

We are looking at a 45-50 incher for Christmas this year.

I did my Consumer Reports research.

I worry about burn out on the Plasma as we have the tv on around the clock on our home bound days.

I am confused about the LCD they say front projection yet in the store they don't have a projector sitting in front of them.

We can get HDTV via our cable so that is not issue.

Sound is a concern as we have medical machines going in our living space.
I don't want to many bells and whistles.
Do they have wireless surround systems.
We are hearing prices will drop around Dec. to push sales.
Looking at spending $2000

Anyone have or seen a Hewlet Packard they will come out and set it all up and the price as of today is $2600. Consumer Reports rates it highest for a lower end price plasma.

Help!


27 posted on 10/09/2006 11:20:46 PM PDT by Global2010 (Tag line went fishing.)
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To: Andy from Chapel Hill

We have the Westinghouse LCD (don't know what size), and we love it!!!!!!!!!!


28 posted on 10/09/2006 11:40:39 PM PDT by luckystarmom
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To: ptlurking


We've got a 32" Dell HDTV and digital cable. The DVR function is amazing. Never thought i'd be able to pause live TV.
29 posted on 10/10/2006 12:04:11 AM PDT by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life)
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To: Liberty Valance; All
To all,

I am starting a HDTV ping list, please ping or frmail me if you would like to be on it.

HD locals may already be on your cable system IF your local cable tv offers them, (I believe it is Federal law that there can be no additional charges for free broadcast TV). You must have the built in tuner to receive, just set up your tuner to find TV stations, and watch, you will need a splitter before any cable box and route a cable directly into the TV's 75ohm screw-in connection. For example, some of our network HD locals are on channels 83.2, 111.10, 118.1, 118.3, and this is all on basic $10/mth cable without paying the additional box rental! We have the DISH gold package for all the other cable channels.(I also still have the VOOM supplied roof top antenna that is disconnected, I plan on putting up a better antenna and rotor next year for more channel selections from distant stations.)

My TV is a SONY 34XBR960 with the superfine picture tube, built-in subwoofer, SONY memory card slot for showing digital camera photos, the newer SONY model has eliminated those features, but still a good TV, and one final comment, a CRT produces the best resolution and the picture tube if proven technology.(It was the largest HDTV that would fit into our entertainment center.)

30 posted on 10/10/2006 12:28:44 AM PDT by Las Vegas Dave ("We're going to take things away from you on behalf of the common good."-Hillary Clinton, June 2004.)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

Please add me to your hdtv ping list, thank you. We just bought one and the picture's unbelievable. It's like you're there, better in a lot of ways. Football and baseball broadcasts are beautiful and I'm starting to watch a lot more sports again.


31 posted on 10/10/2006 12:44:54 AM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: Global2010
Have a DLP and love it. The picture quality is by far the best (IMO). Looks "natural" versus "digital."

Also the DLP doesn't take up much space versus a regular projection TV. More than a plasma or LCD, though.

Unfortunately, LCD looks digital (as it is and especially if you are close). Need something that is "analog" versus a digital source on a digital display.

Plasma was too expensive when we looked (could get a huge DLP for a small fraction of the cost of a dinky Plasma).

Off angle viewing of the DLP is not an issue for us either.

Most monitors are 1080p, now. And most probably have a tuner and cable card. Unfortunately, chances are good that both won't be used if you use cable or satellite. And these items add cost to the monitor. Still the tuner can be hooked up to an antenna for over the air reception of local stations. This is nice.

We have Comcast and are pretty happy with the HD offering. Each premium station, HBO, Cinemax, etc. come with an HD version of one of their stations. And Comcast receive and rebroadcast the local stations in HD.

Most local primetime shows are now in HD. And a couple of the news stations are HD, now.

Via Comcast we get INHD, INHD2, PBSHD, DiscoveryHD, TNTHD, ESPNHD, ESPN2HD plus the local stations.

The quality is stunning.

As for audio, don't know much about wireless surround systems. Unfortunately, the best solution is to run wires.

Shop around!
32 posted on 10/10/2006 9:22:09 AM PDT by dhs12345
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To: george76
Because they are designed to support the High Definition TV standard of 760p - the computer functionality is just an added plus.

760p? Please source that. Never heard of 760p.

33 posted on 10/10/2006 9:29:23 AM PDT by savedbygrace (SECURE THE BORDERS FIRST (I'M YELLING ON PURPOSE))
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To: Las Vegas Dave
The best HDTV signals are off-air. I have a 55" Mitsubishi wide screen and an HD antenna on my roof. I can get all my local HD stations, and the picture quality is just stunning, especially when you switch back and forth from standard to HD.

The company I work for sells off-air HDTV antennas, and business has been really booming for this stuff.
34 posted on 10/10/2006 9:52:59 AM PDT by reagan_fanatic (The fool hath said in his heart, there is no God." (Psalm 53:1))
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To: Liberty Valance

How does your Dell compare ?

Quality, prices, service ?


35 posted on 10/10/2006 9:59:34 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: savedbygrace

This is old thread.

I do not remember about 760p.

If I do recall, I will ping you.


36 posted on 10/10/2006 10:04:12 AM PDT by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: george76

I dug up this older thread to help in my research and hoped it would come back to life with some updates.

After all 2grand is a whole lotta money to spend for us.

However when your home bound on the down dayz movies and such are your best option being a quad. but on our up dayz we are gone from sun up to sun down or somewhere abouts in there.

We would like to get back to sports too and the big screen is what keeps you in the action.


37 posted on 10/10/2006 12:09:24 PM PDT by Global2010 (Tagline walking the dogs.)
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To: dhs12345

What does DLP stand for and what brand did you purchase.


38 posted on 10/10/2006 12:10:44 PM PDT by Global2010 (Tagline walking the dogs.)
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To: george76

I've had HD for nearly a year now and get all signals from TWC (Time Warner Cable).

No problems with their box, which includes a DVR.

I'll be waiting for the HD DVD wars to declare a winner before investing in a new DVD player.

I have a Sony Upconvert model now that I bought this year for $100.

Sadly, I've become addicted to Discovery HD. I now feel closer to the Teutul family than my own.


39 posted on 10/10/2006 12:15:39 PM PDT by TC Rider (The United States Constitution 1791. All Rights Reserved.)
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To: Global2010

I'm "in the biz" as an importer of high-end audio products. Samsung is expected to exhibit their new screen technology at CES2007 that is far superior to Plasma, LCD, etc. I hope to get to their exhibit during CES but will be busy with running my show.


40 posted on 10/10/2006 12:16:37 PM PDT by newfreep
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To: Global2010
Digital Light Processing. It is a projection style monitor with the projector in the base.

Note: you may need a stand (extra cost)whereas with a plasma or LCD can be mounted on the wall.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&pwst=1&defl=en&q=define:DLP&sa=X&oi=glossary_definition&ct=title
41 posted on 10/10/2006 12:22:31 PM PDT by dhs12345
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To: george76

Don't be cheap people!!! Drop the extra coin and get a plasma. TV's last over 15 years. You might as well get the best technology available if you are making such a purchase.


42 posted on 10/10/2006 12:22:51 PM PDT by LetsRok
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To: Global2010

FWIW, I bought a Maxent 52" HD plasma last December at a Best Buy. It's a no-name screen that uses Panasonic components.

It's not on constantly, but sees pretty constant use most evenings and I've had no problems. I'm glad I bought a plasma every time I walk past a LCD, DLP, etc in the stores.


43 posted on 10/10/2006 12:28:03 PM PDT by TC Rider (The United States Constitution 1791. All Rights Reserved.)
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To: dhs12345

Gotcha.

Do to our needs we plan to get a stand. Heck we are even eyeballing our 20yr old chuncky big screen on its wheels as a stand.

The main tv viewer of the house is a quad so tv needs to be high up for viewing in prone position yet turn to other side of living area when in Wheel Chair ect.

I did a quick search back over at Consumer Reports and it concurs with your last post.

I would like to see the Hewlet Packard and like the idea that they come to the house and set it up and it has a 1yr warrantry.
CReports says it can not report on longevity issues thus far so it suggest an extended warranty but at no more than10-15% of the cost of the tv.


44 posted on 10/10/2006 12:36:24 PM PDT by Global2010 (Tagline walking the dogs.)
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To: Las Vegas Dave

RECOMMENDATIONS & NOTES
Good overall, with very good HD and DVD picture quality. The picture quality with all types of signals was the best we saw in this batch of picture-tube TVs. Standard-definition images looked a little soft with a slight green cast but were still good. Long (24-month) part warranty and labor warranty and in-home warranty. This is the successor to the 34XBR960. Film-based image motion compensation feature worked very well. Heavy.FEATURES
The following features are among the most important in determining whether this model will meet your needs.
TV type
As digital television has grown, the choice of TV types has expanded. Most models, known as standard or conventional, receive only the traditional analog TV signal. Digital TVs are available in HDTV (high-definition TV), EDTV (enhanced-definition TV), and SDTV (standard-definition TV) formats. Once the transition to digital TV is complete, SDTV sets are expected to represent the entry level of TVs. HDTVs can display exceptional picture quality in a 16:9 aspect ratio. EDTVs offer a lesser picture quality than HDTV but have a picture that's roughly equivalent to that of progressive-scan DVD players. SDTVs may not measure up to the HDTV sound and picture standards, but they're similar to high-quality standard TVs. (For each type, the term "ready," as in "HD-ready,' refers to the need to connect an external tuner to decode the incoming digital signals.) Even regular TVs will be able to accept digital signals, once broadcasters go all digital, if they're connected to an external digital TV tuner/decoder. They won't, however, display the superior quality of digital signals. Some are actually "monitors" -- like HD monitor -- these lack any kind of tuner and tuner-related features (closed captions, second-audio program, clock).
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Screen size (in.)
The size of the television's screen, measured diagonally in inches. In general, the larger the screen size, the farther away you need to sit for optimal picture quality. It's best to sit approximately 11 feet from a 36-inch set, 10 feet from a 32-inch set, and 8 feet from a 27-inch set. For HD (high-definition) sets, the distances can be halved.
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Screen shape
The screen shape, or aspect ratio, is the proportion of a TV screen's width to its height. Standard TV screens have an aspect ratio of 4:3, giving them a squarish shape that is 4 units wide for every 3 units high. Wide-screen TVs typically have a 16:9 aspect ratio, giving them a wider screen that better resembles the screen in a movie theater. (Some LCD TVs have a 15:9 aspect ratio that differs slightly, but they're often not identified as such.) Wide-screen TVs can use the full screen to display HDTV broadcasts and prerecorded movies. When displayed on a standard screen, such images must be framed at the top and bottom with black bars in order to maintain the wide-screen aspect ratio. Conversely, regular TV programming displayed on a wide screen has black bars on both sides. (Note that much programming actually differs from 4:3 or 16:9, often necessitating bars of some width.) Many sets have stretch and zoom modes to eliminate the bars and fit the image to the screen, albeit with some distortion.
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ATSC digital tuner
An ATSC tuner can receive over-the-air broadcast digital signals, which may include high-definition widescreen images and multichannel sound. A TV with a built-in ATSC tuner, called an integrated HDTV, requires no additional equipment other than a roof antenna to receive the broadcast networks' HD offerings. (You must be close enough to a station transmitting digitally, with no trees or other obstructions blocking the signal.) However, you won't get premium stations offered only on cable or satellite. For that, cable subscribers still need a box or CableCard provided by the cable company; satellite subscribers need an HD receiver/dish setup. ATSC stands for Advanced Television Systems Committee, a nonprofit organization developing voluntary standards for digital television. They defined the signal formats that are used, which include 480p, 720p and 1080i.
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QAM digital tuner
This tuner can receive some digital cable broadcasts, which may include high-definition widescreen images and multichannel sound. A QAM channel can be either unencrypted (in the clear) or encrypted (scrambled). Encryption allows the service provider to define and control the subscription levels (conditional access). With unencrypted channels, you need no other equipment to view the broadcast. With encrypted channels (typically premium channels such as HBO), you need either an external cable box or, with a CableCard-ready TV, a CableCard from your service provider. QAM refers to Quadrature Amplitude Modulation, a way of encoding a digital signal that differs from that used for digital off-air (ATSC) broadcasts.
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CableCard-ready
Also known as "DCR" (digital-cable-ready). When used with a CableCard, these TVs can receive the encrypted cable channels (to the level permitted by your subscription package). You would get a CableCard from the provider. Note that the first-generation CableCard-ready TVs are one-way. They can receive signals but can't communicate back to the provider, so they can't be used for interactive services like subscribe-on-demand. Second-generation CableCard TVs are expected in 2007, maybe sooner.
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Overall height (in.)
The height of a TV, in inches. For flat-panel LCD and plasma sets, this includes the base and detachable speakers, important if you plan to place the TV on a stand or in an entertainment center. See "Panel size without base" if you plan to wall-mount only the display. For rear-projection TVs, the height includes the stand only when it is part of the set.
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Overall width (in.)
The width of a TV, in inches. For flat-panel LCD and plasma sets, this includes the detachable speakers, important if you plan to place the TV on a stand or in an entertainment center. See "Panel size without base" if you plan to wall-mount only the display. For rear-projection TVs, the width includes the stand only when it is part of the set.
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Overall depth (in.)
The depth of a TV, in inches. For flat-panel LCD and plasma sets, this includes the base and detachable speakers, important if you plan to place the TV on a stand or in an entertainment center. See "Panel size without base" if you plan to wall-mount only the display. For rear-projection TVs, the depth includes the stand only when it is part of the set. Also allow extra room for cables to connect to the back of the TV.
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Weight (lb.)
How much the television weighs (in pounds). This varies with the screen size and model.
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Warranty (months): parts/labor/in-home
The length of time the television is covered by its manufacturer for defects or repairs. Most warranty coverage is divided into parts and labor, typically one year for parts and either 90 days or one year for labor. (CRT-based TV warranties sometimes cover the picture tube itself for 24 months.) With an in-home warranty, a technician comes to your home to service the set when you have a problem--of particular importance with heavy or wall-mounted sets.
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Illuminated remote
Some remote controls offer illuminated buttons for easier operation in a dimly lit room.
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3:2-pulldown compensation
A feature on most digital TVs that can enable things in motion to look less jagged around the edges. It affects only movies converted from film to video--the majority of cinematic movies on DVD. This feature is sometimes referred to as film mode, cinema mode, movie mode, or by brand-specific names such as CineMotion. Progressive-scan DVD players have this feature as well. With older, non-progressive-scan DVD players, which lack 3:2-pulldown compensation, we recommend you buy a TV that offers this feature. Even with progressive-scan DVD players, there's some benefit to buying a TV that has 3:2-pulldown compensation. By going into the menus on both pieces of equipment, you can compare the performance of the feature on the DVD player and the TV, and use the one that does a better job.
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Can customize display settings by source
Some sets can recall picture adjustments (such as brightness and contrast) you made while using a specific content source--say, your DVD player or a cable box. Settings in TVs with this feature may be stored automatically or by pressing a button on your remote.
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PIP (no. of tuners)
Many TV sets offer PIP (picture-in-picture), a feature that lets you watch two images at the same time on one screen: the first, full-size; the second, in a small box within the larger picture. A variant of this is POP (picture-outside-of-picture), with which the screen image is split evenly in two. TVs with dual-tuner PIP or POP can tune into two channels simultaneously without the contribution of additional equipment. Those with only one tuner require a second, external tuner, such as a VCR, in order to use PIP. Some TVs can send the second channel's audio to a separate audio output.
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Virtual surround sound
Produces a simulation of the surround-sound effect using just two speakers.
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Memory-card slot
Found in a few TVs, a slot that accepts memory cards for viewing still images from digital cameras. Inserting the camera's card typically results in better image quality than if you connect the camera to the TV's composite-video input. Some memory cards are specific to one or more specific manufacturers--such as Memory Stick slots in some Sony TVs. Other slots may accept CompactFlash, SmartMedia, MultiMedia Card, Secure Digital, and/or other media.
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Composite-video inputs (rear/front or side)
Composite-video inputs are the most common type of video inputs found on TVs. These carry only the video signal, providing better picture quality than RF. These are often used to connect a VCR or cable box. Many sets have front-panel composite-video inputs, which let you make temporary connections to camcorders, game consoles, digital cameras and other devices with composite-video output.
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Rear s-video inputs
These split the video signal into two parts, color and luminance. In general, an S-video input will provide better picture quality than either an antenna/cable or composite-video input. These are often used with digital-cable boxes, satellite receivers, and DVD players.
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Front or side s-video inputs
These split the video signal into two parts, color and luminance. In general, an S-video input will provide better picture quality than either an antenna/cable or composite-video input. These are often used with digital-cable boxes, satellite receivers, and DVD players.
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Component-video inputs
Component-video inputs use three separate jacks that separate the video signal into three parts: two for color and one for luminance. This provides slightly better quality than an S-video connection, most evident in color fidelity. They can be used only with a DVD player, digital-cable box, or other equipment that has component-video output.
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HDMI inputs
A relatively new form of digital audio/video input in some high-definition TVs, it matches a corresponding output in some DVD players and digital TV tuners. Like DVI, it potentially allows content providers to control your ability to record the content. Unlike DVI, HDMI carries audio and video signals on the same cable.
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DVI inputs
Digital Visual Interface, a relatively new form of digital video input in some high-definition TVs; it matches a corresponding output in some DVD players and digital TV tuners. Like HDMI (See "HDMI"), it potentially allows content providers to control your ability to record the content. Unlike HDMI, DVI requires a separate audio cable to carry the audio signals.
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Digital-audio output
A TV with a built-in digital tuner often comes with either a coaxial or optical digital-audio output to let you route the Dolby Digital or DTS multichannel soundtrack to a receiver for decoding. The receiver thus splits apart the soundtrack for distribution to various speakers in the room. This output must match the input of the receiver.
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Headphone jack
When you want to watch TV without disturbing others, a headphone jack (usually on the front or side of the set) lets you plug in headphones so you alone hear the sound. You won't find this feature on most sets.
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BASIC SPECS
TV typeDigital (integrated HDTV) Screen size (in.)34 Screen shape16:9 ATSC digital tunerYes QAM digital tunerYes CableCard-readyNo Overall height (in.)26 Overall width (in.)39.5 Overall depth (in.)24 Weight (lb.)190 Warranty (months): parts/labor/in-home24/24/24 FEATURES
Illuminated remoteNo 3:2-pulldown compensationYes Can customize display settings by sourceYes PIP (no. of tuners)No Virtual surround soundYes Memory-card slotNone CONNECTIONS
Composite-video inputs (rear/front or side)2/1 Rear s-video inputs2 Front or side s-video inputs1 Component-video inputs2 HDMI inputs1 DVI inputs0 Digital-audio outputCoaxial Headphone jackNo


45 posted on 10/10/2006 1:04:51 PM PDT by Global2010 (Tagline walking the dogs.)
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To: TC Rider; letsrock

Fujitsu Plasmavision P50XTA51UB $550050
63.
1366x768•••2103154.513.5  LG 50PC1DR $330050
63.
1366x768•••22034.551.514  Hewlett-Packard HP PL5060N $260050
59.
1366x768••  2113361.512.5  Panasonic TH-50PX60U $310050
55.
1366x768••  22034.54814.5  Zenith Z50PX2D $250050
55.
1366x768••  21032.555.512.5  Samsung HP-S5053 $320050
51.
1366x768•    22033.548.513  Dell W5001C $300050
46.
1366x768•    220325512 


46 posted on 10/10/2006 1:15:16 PM PDT by Global2010 (Tagline walking the dogs.)
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To: george76

Dell according to CR rated good but more poorly in areas and cost $500 bucks more than the 2nd best rated.

Don't quote me on this but I also believe I read dell had poor warranty and service, I would have to go back to double check the warranty and fixable rating.


47 posted on 10/10/2006 1:18:26 PM PDT by Global2010 (Tagline walking the dogs.)
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To: newfreep

Sounds exciting.

However Christmas is my deadline.

We could never afford to buy this but recieved an unexpected gift for the other person in the house to buy one.
I always joked and told him be a decade before we could afford one.

Well that ended up being only two years due to the "gift".

I agree with others if ya gonna buy a 50 incher spend the extra bucks (I could even finance the extra $600) if we decide to go with Hewlett Pack.

Do you have any personal exp in veiw HP's?

I know they said we can have them set it up and get it running and we can return it if it doesn't satisfy our viewing pleasure.


48 posted on 10/10/2006 1:24:45 PM PDT by Global2010 (Tagline walking the dogs.)
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To: Global2010

To all looking at this thread and thinking of buying HD this year, visit avsforum.com

They are the AV Geek FreeRepublic.

TC


49 posted on 10/10/2006 1:37:37 PM PDT by TC Rider (The United States Constitution 1791. All Rights Reserved.)
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To: TC Rider

Thanks!


50 posted on 10/10/2006 1:41:24 PM PDT by Global2010 (Tagline walking the dogs.)
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