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2006 State Quarter Designs
United States Mint ^ | January 2006 | US Mint

Posted on 01/13/2006 2:15:39 PM PST by RayBob

2006 State Quarter Designs

Here are the 2006 State Quarters in order of release:

Nevada

The first commemorative quarter-dollar coin released in 2006 honors Nevada, and is the 36th coin in the United States Mint's 50 State Quarters® Program. Nevada, nicknamed "The Silver State," was admitted into the Union on October 31, 1864, becoming our Nation's 36th state. Nevada's quarter depicts a trio of wild mustangs, the sun rising behind snow-capped mountains, bordered by sagebrush and a banner that reads "The Silver State." The coin also bears the inscriptions "Nevada" and "1864."

Nevada became a territory in 1861, several years after a Mormon Battalion in the Mexican War discovered gold and silver in the area of Virginia City. This discovery would later be referred to as one of the greatest mineral discoveries, famously known as the Comstock Lode.

Nevada is home to more than 50 percent of the Nation's wild horses. The wild horses dominate the Great Basin in the vast deserts and the more than 150 mountain ranges. The first mention of wild horses was discovered in several journals dating to the 1820s.

On behalf of Governor Kenny Guinn and State Treasurer Brian K. Krolicki, the Nevada State Quarter Commission accepted design concepts from the public in the summer of 2004. The 18-member Commission reviewed all submissions, and forwarded five recommendations to the United States Mint. The corresponding design images were created by United States Mint sculptor-engravers and artists in the United States Mint's Artistic Infusion Program. The citizens of Nevada voted on the designs. More than 60,000 votes were cast, and the people of Nevada favored the galloping horses design, "The Silver State."

On July 20, 2005, the Department of the Treasury approved the design of three galloping wild horses, sagebrush, the sun rising behind snow-capped mountains and the State's nickname, "The Silver State," inside a banner. The four other design concepts considered during the state-wide vote were " Nevada's Early Heritage," featuring a petroglyph and native artifacts; "Silver Miner," with a miner holding a pick axe in front of a Comstock mine; "Nevada Wilderness," featuring an image of a Big Horn Sheep above snow-capped mountains; and "Battle Born Nevada," featuring a pair of crossed pick axes fronted by a stylized star, representing Nevada's entry into the Union.

Nebraska

The second commemorative quarter-dollar coin released in 2006 honors Nebraska, and is the 37th coin in the United States Mint's 50 State Quarters® Program. Nebraska, nicknamed the "Cornhusker State," was admitted into the Union on March 1, 1867, becoming our Nation's 37th state. Nebraska's quarter depicts an ox-drawn covered wagon carrying pioneers in the foreground and Chimney Rock, the natural wonder that rises from the valley of North Platte River, measuring 445 feet from base to tip. The sun is in full view behind the wagon. The coin also bears the inscriptions "Nebraska," "Chimney Rock" and "1867."

Chimney Rock was designated a National Historic Site on August 9, 1956, and is maintained and operated by the Nebraska State Historical Society.

Practically anywhere travelers go in Nebraska they will encounter reminders of America's westward expansion. The state is crisscrossed by the Oregon and Mormon Trails, the Pony Express, the Lewis and Clark Trail, the Texas-Ogallala Trail and the Sidney-Deadwood Trail.

The Nebraska State Quarter Design Committee accepted nearly 6,500 quarter design ideas from citizens. Four of these were forwarded to the United States Mint and were used as the basis for narrative designs that were created by United States Mint sculptor-engravers and artists in the United States Mint's Artistic Infusion Program. Nebraska Governor Dave Heineman announced his recommendation of "Chimney Rock" on June 1, 2005. The Department of the Treasury approved the design on July 20, 2005.

The three other design concepts considered during the final selection process were "The Capitol," featuring a rendition of the architecturally striking State Capitol in Lincoln; "The Sower," depicting the figure that stands atop the Nebraska Capitol, representing Nebraska's standing as an agricultural leader; and "Chief Standing Bear," paying tribute to the Ponca Indian Chief.

Colorado

The third commemorative quarter-dollar coin released in 2006 honors Colorado, and is the 38th coin in the United States Mint's 50 State Quarters® Program. The Colorado quarter depicts a sweeping view of the State's rugged Rocky Mountains with evergreen trees and a banner carrying the inscription "Colorful Colorado." The coin also bears the inscriptions "Colorado" and "1876."

Colorado's Rocky Mountains are home to some of the Nation's most majestic natural wonders. Among these, rising approximately 10,000 feet from the valley floor in Northwest Colorado, Grand Mesa is the largest flat-top mountain in the world, and is home to more than 200 lakes and many miles of scenic hiking trails.

Colorado was admitted into the Union on August 1, 1876, becoming our Nation's 38th state. With statehood gained less than one month after the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Colorado is nicknamed the "Centennial State."

The Colorado Commemorative Quarter Advisory Commission was formed by an Executive Order issued by Governor Bill Owens. Colorado First Lady Frances Owens served as Commission Chair, and design narratives were accepted from citizens. From more than 1,500 submissions accepted by the Commission, five concepts were forwarded to the United States Mint.

The sculptor-engravers of the United States Mint and artists in the United States Mint's Artistic Infusion Program developed the candidate designs from the narratives provided, and the designs were returned to Colorado in May 2005. On May 31, 2005, Governor Owens announced "Colorful Colorado" as his recommendation for the Colorado commemorative quarter-dollar. The Department of the Treasury approved the design on July 20, 2005.

The four other design concepts considered during the final selection process were "Mesa Verde," featuring Mesa Verde National Park with cliff dwellings; "10th Mountain Division Birthplace," depicting a soldier/skier of the famed United States Army Division that originated in Colorado; "The Centennial State," which features a stylized letter "C" entwined a mountain columbine flower; and the Rocky Mountains and "Pikes Peak," featuring the gold rush slogan "Pikes Peak or Bust" and a prospector's pick and shovel.

North Dakota

The fourth commemorative quarter-dollar coin released in 2006 honors North Dakota, and is the 39th coin in the United States Mint's 50 State Quarters® Program. On November 2, 1889, North Dakota was admitted into the Union, becoming our Nation's 39th state. The North Dakota quarter depicts a pair of grazing American bison in the foreground with a sunset view of the rugged buttes and canyons that help define the State's Badlands region in the background. The coin's design also bears the inscriptions "North Dakota" and "1889."

President Theodore Roosevelt founded the United States Forest Service and signed the Antiquities Act in 1906, which was designed to preserve and protect unspoiled places such as his beloved North Dakota Badlands, now known as Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Herds of American Bison thundered across the Badlands through the 1860s. The park is now home to more than 400 wild buffalo, an animal once on the brink of extinction.

The North Dakota Quarter Design Selection Process was launched by Governor John Hoeven on April 14, 2004, when the State's nine-member commission was announced. Chaired by Lieutenant Governor Jack Dalrymple, the commission invited North Dakotans of all ages to submit narratives of 50 words or less. After reviewing thousands of suggestions, the commission recommended three narratives for design development: Agriculture, Landscape and Badlands. Candidate designs were developed by the sculptor-engravers of the United States Mint and artists in the United States Mint's Artistic Infusion Program and returned to North Dakota. On June 3, 2005, Governor Hoeven recommended the "Badlands with Bison" design for the North Dakota commemorative quarter-dollar.

The Department of the Treasury approved the design on July 20, 2005. One of the two other design concepts considered during the final selection process was "Agriculture," the predominant industry in the State. This design included an aerial view of a modern farm with bountiful fields under an open sky. The other finalist, "Landscape," featured migrating waterfowl and the sun breaking through clouds over a vast, sweeping landscape scene.

South Dakota

The fifth and final commemorative quarter-dollar coin released in 2006 honors South Dakota, the "Mount Rushmore State," and is the 40th coin in the United States Mint's 50 State Quarters® Program. Admitted into the Union on November 2, 1889, South Dakota became the Nation's 40th state. The release of this quarter signals the end of the eighth year of the 50 State Quarters Program.

The South Dakota quarter features an image of the State bird, a Chinese ring-necked pheasant, in flight above a depiction of the Mount Rushmore National Monument, featuring the faces of four American Presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln. The design is bordered by heads of wheat. The coin's design also bears the inscriptions "South Dakota" and "1889."

Sculptor Gutzon Borglum began drilling into Mount Rushmore, the 5,725-foot peak rising above Harney National Forest, in 1927. Creation of the "Shrine of Democracy" took 14 years and cost approximately $1 million, though it is now deemed priceless.

The South Dakota Quarter Advisory Committee began accepting ideas from the citizens of South Dakota via telephone, letters and e-mail. A group of five possible narratives was agreed upon and forwarded to the United States Mint for consideration. The final artistic renderings, developed by the sculptor-engravers of the United States Mint and artists in the United States Mint's Artistic Infusion Program, were returned to South Dakota, and a statewide vote was conducted. On April 27, 2005, South Dakota Governor M. Michael Rounds announced his recommendation of the "Mount Rushmore and Pheasant" design, echoing the choice of those who participated in the statewide vote.

The Department of the Treasury approved the design on May 28, 2005. The other design concepts considered during the final selection process were "Mount Rushmore National Monument," featuring a three-quarter view of the famous mountain carving; "American Bison," depicting the classic animal symbol of the west; "Chinese Ring-necked Pheasant," featuring an image of the state bird in flight; and "Mount Rushmore and Bison," which placed an American bison in the foreground and Mount Rushmore in the background.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Government; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: coins; designs; numismatics; quarter; state; usmint
Colorado's not bad. Kind of like North Dakota's. Don't care for Nevada. South Dakota is OK, I guess.
1 posted on 01/13/2006 2:15:43 PM PST by RayBob
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To: RayBob
Colorado's not bad. Kind of like North Dakota's. Don't care for Nevada. South Dakota is OK, I guess.

Great faces. Great Places. South Dakota.

I'm surprised Nevada's quarter doesn't have a slot machine, casino or bunny ranch on it.
2 posted on 01/13/2006 2:22:27 PM PST by conservative in nyc
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To: RayBob
Next year's coins will be Montana, Washington, Idaho, Wyoming and Utah. Here are some of the contenders:

Needless to say, these are early proposals and the finalists have not yet been selected. I'm just posting these for fun.

3 posted on 01/13/2006 2:24:15 PM PST by RayBob (If guns kill people, can I blame misspelled words on my keyboard?)
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To: conservative in nyc
I'm surprised Nevada's quarter doesn't have a slot machine, casino or bunny ranch on it.

Or a mobile home with a satellite dish.
4 posted on 01/13/2006 2:25:24 PM PST by VegasCowboy ("...he wore his gun outside his pants, for all the honest world to feel.")
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To: RayBob
I love to see the way states treat their history or what they are known for on the designs.

I live in Maryland.

Francis Scott Key wrote the Star Spangled Banner!
Bloodiest battle of the civil war-Antietam!
The Chesapeake Bay -the largest estuary in the US!
Home of the NAVAL academy!
Steamed Crabs!!!!!

and instead we got:

instead of this:


5 posted on 01/13/2006 2:32:19 PM PST by icwhatudo (The rino borg...is resistance futile?)
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To: RayBob
Release Order for 2006 thru 2008:

2006

Nevada

Nebraska

Colorado

North Dakota

South Dakota

2007

Montana

Washington

Idaho

Wyoming

Utah

2008

Oklahoma

New Mexico

Arizona

Alaska

Hawaii

6 posted on 01/13/2006 2:33:05 PM PST by RayBob (If guns kill people, can I blame misspelled words on my keyboard?)
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To: RayBob; Tijeras_Slim; NormsRevenge; SmithL; presidio9; Constitution Day
Image hosted by Photobucket.com

Kali's entry.

7 posted on 01/13/2006 2:34:11 PM PST by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: icwhatudo
Yeah, well I live in Pennsylvania...guess not too much happened here, cuz we got:


8 posted on 01/13/2006 2:34:41 PM PST by RayBob (If guns kill people, can I blame misspelled words on my keyboard?)
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To: icwhatudo

You beat me to it. It appears that for another year, our Maryland retains the title for "stupidest quarter design".

We can only hope that some hapless western state decides to engrave the likeness of a favored document storage facility, or perhaps an impressive overpass, onto their quarter design.


9 posted on 01/13/2006 2:36:42 PM PST by RetroSexual
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To: icwhatudo

How much do you think the Massachussetts liberals love their quarter with the dead-white-gun-toting-male (perhaps slave-owning) war-mongering minuteman?


10 posted on 01/13/2006 2:37:33 PM PST by Nomen Klatura
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To: VegasCowboy


What is the thing with the big neck in the background? A dinosaur?
11 posted on 01/13/2006 2:38:06 PM PST by conservative in nyc
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To: RayBob

What, no sheep on the Montana quarter?


12 posted on 01/13/2006 2:38:47 PM PST by ssaftler (Politically Correct isn't! Progressives aren't!)
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To: RayBob
I really don't care for any of them except Utah

What is that in the 2nd Montana coin?
It looks like the Loch Ness Monster!

13 posted on 01/13/2006 2:38:48 PM PST by apackof2 (You can stand me up at the gates of hell, I'll stand my ground and I won’t back down)
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To: Nomen Klatura

It was either that or the old wild-eyed Patriot that used to adorn the football team's helmet!


14 posted on 01/13/2006 2:40:04 PM PST by ssaftler (Politically Correct isn't! Progressives aren't!)
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Comment #15 Removed by Moderator

To: ssaftler

Michigan's takes the cake for B O R I N G.


16 posted on 01/13/2006 2:47:11 PM PST by Appalled but Not Surprised
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To: RayBob; conservative in nyc

I love the Nevada quarter! But then, I'm a horse owner - and Nevada is famous for its mustangs.

I just scanned through the rest of the posts - LOL on the AR quarter!


17 posted on 01/13/2006 2:49:03 PM PST by livius
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To: RayBob

If you flip the South Dakota coin, you're either gonna get heads, or you're gonna get HEADS.


18 posted on 01/13/2006 2:49:45 PM PST by Junior_G
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To: icwhatudo; RayBob
Look at this hideous gem we got for Tennessee:

We have the Great Smoky Mountains, the Mighty Mississippi, a State Capitol building that was on Confederate currency, the Grand Ole Opry, and Elvis... and we get instruments with the wrong number of strings.

19 posted on 01/13/2006 2:50:23 PM PST by fieldmarshaldj (Cheney X -- Destroying the Liberal Democrat Traitors By Any Means Necessary -- Ya Dig ? Sho 'Nuff.)
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To: conservative in nyc
I believe that is a duck-billed dinosaur... what were they called? Hadosaurs or something like it?

I'm guessing that that won't be chosen as the design...lol

20 posted on 01/13/2006 2:51:11 PM PST by RayBob (If guns kill people, can I blame misspelled words on my keyboard?)
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To: RayBob

The Utah coin is good looking.


21 posted on 01/13/2006 2:53:34 PM PST by Jet Jaguar
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To: RayBob
When you encourage schoolgirls to stuff the ballot box, you end up with "My Silky Pony":


22 posted on 01/13/2006 2:55:34 PM PST by Atlas Sneezed (Your FRiendly FReeper Patent Attorney)
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To: VegasCowboy
The Nevada Quarter:


23 posted on 01/13/2006 2:56:56 PM PST by RockinRight ("It's as if all the brain-damaged people in America got together and formed a voting bloc" - Coulter)
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To: Appalled but Not Surprised

There have been some real clunkers out there, hasn't there? I believe each state had its own method for picking the final design. Here in Cali-phony-a, there was some kind of ballot that, of course, wasn't terribly well publicized.

I personally would have liked to have seen an outline of the state with a giant crack going through it to symbolize the San Andreas Fault and our ever-occuring earthquakes, but what do I know?


24 posted on 01/13/2006 2:58:33 PM PST by ssaftler (Politically Correct isn't! Progressives aren't!)
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To: RockinRight

LOL! I've seen that before titled "datenight in Wyoming."


25 posted on 01/13/2006 2:58:48 PM PST by VegasCowboy ("...he wore his gun outside his pants, for all the honest world to feel.")
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To: Beelzebubba

I personally liked the design featuring the newly-dug graves out in the desert for the mafia stool-pigeons.


26 posted on 01/13/2006 3:00:25 PM PST by fieldmarshaldj (Cheney X -- Destroying the Liberal Democrat Traitors By Any Means Necessary -- Ya Dig ? Sho 'Nuff.)
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To: RayBob
That's not a real Colorado mountain, but a "generic" one. Why they didn't put the fourth or fifth most famous mountain in the world (Pikes Peak) on the coin is beyond me.
27 posted on 01/13/2006 3:07:17 PM PST by Semi Civil Servant (The Main Stream Media: Al-Qaeda's most effective spy network.)
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To: icwhatudo

I don't know. I thought that Missouri's looked like a toilet seat.


28 posted on 01/13/2006 3:15:26 PM PST by hanamizu
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To: Semi Civil Servant

It might have hurt the other mountains' feelings.


29 posted on 01/13/2006 3:18:18 PM PST by kenth (Schrödinger's dog is both happy and sad.)
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To: RayBob

Michigan and Wisconsin are fairly pitiful.


30 posted on 01/13/2006 4:26:08 PM PST by onja ("The government of England is a limited mockery." (France is a complete mockery.)
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To: ssaftler

(1) The San Francisco entry for the Calif coin is based on "Brokeback Mt" movie.
(2) Forget about the "superior to Chucky Cheese" token designs, go back to genuine silver/copper/gold coinage and few will quibble about the designs.

I used to collect coins when a kid, but lost enthusiam when even the copper pennies were debased by switching to copper-plated pot metal (zinc?).


31 posted on 01/13/2006 5:46:58 PM PST by OldArmy52
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To: Junior_G

Very Good! Hope I remember to try that on someone.


32 posted on 01/13/2006 5:54:50 PM PST by Textide
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To: OldArmy52

go back to genuine silver/copper/gold coinage and few will quibble about the designs. >>

That would require, oh, what? Dropping a zero from the U.S. dollar? Won't happen.


33 posted on 01/13/2006 6:57:02 PM PST by Appalled but Not Surprised
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To: Beelzebubba

We in Wisconsin got the head of a cow and some cheese. All the little grade-schoolers voted for it in an online poll. And our gov, having the intelect of a grade schooler, felt right at home going along with them.


34 posted on 01/13/2006 9:01:49 PM PST by Mygirlsmom ("Sheep are very dim. Once they get an idea in their 'eads, there's no shiftin' it.")
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To: Mygirlsmom
And here it is...


35 posted on 01/17/2006 2:16:03 PM PST by RayBob (If guns kill people, can I blame misspelled words on my keyboard?)
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To: RayBob

Mississippi just has a magnolia flower, about the most boring one.


36 posted on 01/17/2006 2:33:45 PM PST by Sybeck1
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To: Sybeck1

It may not be exciting, but artistically, it is, IMHO, one of the most attractive and aesthetically pleasing coins.


37 posted on 01/17/2006 6:38:02 PM PST by RayBob (If guns kill people, can I blame misspelled words on my keyboard?)
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To: RayBob

I just saw the West Virginia quarter. Is that the Robert Byrd Bridge?
By the way. Why did New York put a New Jersey landmark on their quarter?


38 posted on 01/17/2006 6:46:02 PM PST by yawningotter
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