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Alcohol Saves the Planet
Reason ^ | February 3, 2006 | Ronald Bailey

Posted on 02/03/2006 5:36:54 PM PST by neverdem

The future of booze-fueled machines

Give your car a drink, save the planet, and end dependence on foreign oil. That's more or less the plan George W. Bush unveiled during his State of the Union message earlier this week, in which he also declared his intention to "fund additional research in cutting-edge methods of producing ethanol, not just from corn, but from wood chips and stalks, or switch grass." By throwing tax dollars at research on how to turn vegetation into alcohol to burn in our cars and trucks, Bush hopes to move the country "beyond a petroleum-based economy, and make our dependence on Middle Eastern oil a thing of the past."

Currently, about 3.4 billion gallons of ethanol for fuel is produced from fermenting sugars and starches derived from corn. This ethanol is blended into gasoline in the United States and is equal to about 2 percent of all gasoline sold by volume and 1.3 percent of its energy content. The federal Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires that 7.5 billion gallons of renewable fuels be blended into gasoline by 2012 and the government offers a $0.51 per gallon of ethanol tax credit. A federal government study in 2005 envisioned biofuels replacing 30 percent of petroleum consumption by 2030.

The motivations behind the push for ethanol vary. For farmers and farm state politicians it's another agriculture subsidy. For foreign policy hawks, it's a way to free our country from dangerous dependence on unstable and hostile regimes. It's also an answer to peak oilers who claim that the world is about to run out of fossil fuels. Environmentalists see ethanol as fuel that does not add more man-made heat-trapping gases to the atmosphere and thus helps curb global warming. But will producing alcohol to burn in internal combustion engines really save the planet and cut dependence on foreign oil? Maybe.

For years, scientists have been fighting over whether making ethanol from crops uses more energy than it produces. On negative side stand Cornell University ecologist David Pimentel and University of California-Berkeley environmental engineer Tad Patzek. They published a study last July that found that producing ethanol using crops used 29 to 57 percent more fossil fuel energy than it saved.

Last week, the Energy and Resources Group at UC-Berkeley headed by Alex Farrell published an analysis in Science of six energy balance studies on producing ethanol, including the Pimentel and Patzek study, and came to the opposite conclusion. The Berkeley team found that current methods of producing ethanol from crops, chiefly corn, generate about 20 percent more energy than they use. Farrell argues that the Pimentel and Patzek study included out-of-date information and did not count the co-products such as animal feed that result from ethanol production. Stay tuned—this spat among ecologists and environmental engineers is far from over.

In any case, most researchers agree that turning what is essentially food into fuel is not a good strategy in the long term. As President Bush mentioned, they envision a future of biorefineries churning out ethanol from non-food biomass including wood chips, corn stalks, willow trees, and switch grass. The idea is that the tough cellulose and lignin that hold plant cells together can somehow be broken down into simpler sugars and starches that can be fermented into ethanol. One problem—producing ethanol in this manner costs way too much now.

However, in Science last week, another team of researchers outlined a path toward a future fueled by billions of gallons of cellulosic ethanol. Their vision of the biofueled future involves a great deal of genetic engineering that is guaranteed to give unending nightmares to the anti-biotechnology wing of the environmentalist movement.

For example, the researchers foresee plant scientists engineering "energy crops" to at least double the biomass produced per acre. They note that plants typically capture less than 2 percent of the light that falls on them for use in photosynthesis. They suggest boosting plant photosynthesis by installing more efficient genes from bacteria. They point to research in which genes dealing with nitrogen metabolism taken from a species of pine tree and inserted into poplars increased the poplars' height by 41 percent and stem diameter by 36 percent over three years.

Other research aims to make the biomass produced by energy crops easier and cheaper to break down into sugars and starches that can be fermented into ethanol. For example, some forestry geneticists already use bioengineering to insert a molecular switch that reduces the amount of tough lignin a tree produces while increasing the amount of cellulose. Another idea for softening up cellulose is to install a gene for the enzyme cellulase in energy crops, a gene which will later be activated to break down cellulose by spraying the crops with a trigger compound just before harvest. On the plus side for leery anti-biotech types, energy crops could be engineered so that they did not produce seeds or flowers—which, incidentally, would encourage them to stop wasting resources on reproduction and just make more biomass.

The pathway to a partially biofueled future may actually work technically and may produce more energy than it uses. One can even imagine that biofuels could become cheaper than fossil fuels. If that's the case, the industry will not need any federal subsidies to take off. And there is great side benefit for culture war spectators: They can pull up a ringside seat and watch as the global warming faction of the environmentalist movement thrashes the anti-biotechnology wing.


Ronald Bailey is Reason's science correspondent.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events; US: District of Columbia
KEYWORDS: alcohol; biomass; energy; ethanol

1 posted on 02/03/2006 5:36:58 PM PST by neverdem
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To: neverdem
-- And there is great side benefit for culture war spectators: They can pull up a ringside seat and watch as the global warming faction of the environmentalist movement thrashes the anti-biotechnology wing.--

--that would be fun to watch--

2 posted on 02/03/2006 5:43:22 PM PST by rellimpank (Don't believe anything about firearms or explosives stated by the mass media---NRABenefactor)
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To: rellimpank
"--that would be fun to watch--"

Will they sell beer or just ethanol?
3 posted on 02/03/2006 5:45:15 PM PST by decal (Too many people mistake "tolerance" for "approval")
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To: neverdem

I wonder how much petroleum the USA would save if all children were home schooled, thus eliminating school buses, and the heating and lighting of school buildings.


4 posted on 02/03/2006 5:51:15 PM PST by gas0linealley
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To: neverdem

Alcohol sure kicked me in the creek tonight.


5 posted on 02/03/2006 5:53:25 PM PST by Toespi
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To: gas0linealley
--I'm eagerly awaiting the first evidence that ethanol producers are starting to use it extensively in the planting, cultivating and harvesting of corn--and in the stills that produce it--
6 posted on 02/03/2006 5:55:19 PM PST by rellimpank (Don't believe anything about firearms or explosives stated by the mass media---NRABenefactor)
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To: Toespi

I wonder what would happen if you forgot to put the gas cap back on and you got pulled over... "Sorry officer, I didn't realize I had an open container..." or if you really had an open container in your car could you say "Er... no Officer that's my spare fuel in that Jack Daniels bottle"


7 posted on 02/03/2006 6:02:50 PM PST by YummiBox
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To: rellimpank

I've never heard that ethanol can be fed to ordinary diesel engines. I seem to remember reading that steam automobiles were sometimes run on alcohol though.


8 posted on 02/03/2006 6:05:49 PM PST by gas0linealley
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To: gas0linealley

--it can't--


9 posted on 02/03/2006 6:12:08 PM PST by rellimpank (Don't believe anything about firearms or explosives stated by the mass media---NRABenefactor)
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To: rellimpank

Well then, time to bring back the steam traction engine and put the diesel tractors, combines and such out behind the barn.


10 posted on 02/03/2006 6:16:02 PM PST by gas0linealley
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To: neverdem

I'll drink to that!


11 posted on 02/03/2006 6:17:17 PM PST by GingisK
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To: gas0linealley

--my point being that if it is such an energy saver, why aren't farmers starting to convert back to spark-ignition machinery using it?


12 posted on 02/03/2006 6:18:31 PM PST by rellimpank (Don't believe anything about firearms or explosives stated by the mass media---NRABenefactor)
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To: decal; Toespi

Well, my ancestors up here in Tennessee knew what to do with corn.

As the song "Rocky Top," says, we grow our corn in a jar :)


13 posted on 02/03/2006 6:18:47 PM PST by girlangler (I'd rather be fishing)
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To: gas0linealley

Steam automobiles (some of them, anyway) did use alcohol to fuel "flash" boilers (steam generators, actually.) Many also used gasoline for the same purpose. Jay Leno had a great article on his steam car in Popular Mechanics a year or two ago.


14 posted on 02/03/2006 6:28:25 PM PST by Ostlandr ( Hey! Where'd my tagline go?)
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To: rellimpank

maybe it's because the farmers figure their existing equipment will do, until they have their auction.


15 posted on 02/03/2006 6:31:37 PM PST by gas0linealley
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To: Ostlandr

The development of steam cars got cut off, perhaps prematurely, but maybe they will make a comeback.


16 posted on 02/03/2006 6:36:37 PM PST by gas0linealley
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To: rellimpank

Alcohol has the same downside that Hydrogen has. You can't just pump it out of the ground; it takes energy to produce it.
Even envisioning a high-tech process where the heat released from fermentation was captured and used for the distillation process, and a very efficient heat-capture system for the still, it's still going to require energy.
Add in the petroleum diesel used in the combines, tractors, etc. to produce the corn, and I'm not sure if it would be a positive return on the energy investment or not. Anybody have the figures on that?
If they can be made efficient, both Alcohol and Biodiesel are methods of turning solar energy collected by plants into energy. Chemical fuels like Gasoline, Alcohol, Biodiesel, etc. are still the most efficient method of packaging, storing and transporting energy we have.
If we use all the developing technoligies, we can reduce our petroleum energy demands enough to become self-sufficient in energy. That will have a very positive effect on our trade balance. And the increase in energy supplies should in theory lower prices.


17 posted on 02/03/2006 6:46:06 PM PST by Ostlandr ( Hey! Where'd my tagline go?)
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To: Ostlandr
If they can be made efficient, both Alcohol and Biodiesel are methods of turning solar energy collected by plants into energy. Chemical fuels like Gasoline, Alcohol, Biodiesel, etc. are still the most efficient method of packaging, storing and transporting energy we have.

An Energy Revolution If you haven't read it, I think you'll find it interesting.

18 posted on 02/03/2006 7:16:28 PM PST by neverdem (May you be in heaven a half hour before the devil knows that you're dead.)
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To: gas0linealley

I heard from a co-worker related to moonshiners that pure ethanol was an excellent motor fuel and provided "getaway power" to outrun the revenooers. Not fuel efficient, though.


19 posted on 02/04/2006 3:17:27 AM PST by elcid1970
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To: neverdem

Who will be more tanked, my jeep or me?


20 posted on 02/04/2006 3:20:43 AM PST by TXBSAFH (Proud Dad of Twins, What Does Not Kill You Makes You Stronger!!!!!!)
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To: neverdem

Thanks for the ping! Great read.


21 posted on 02/04/2006 7:33:43 AM PST by Ostlandr ( Hey! Where'd my tagline go?)
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To: neverdem; abner; Abundy; AGreatPer; alisasny; ALlRightAllTheTime; AlwaysFree; AnnaSASsyFR; ...

BTTT!

I am of the opinion that government should just get the heck out of the way on energy policy, but this article is making me rethink that stance. However, there are a couple of Constitutional issues.

First of all, there is no constitutional power for an energy policy period. Congress has the power to regulate commerce, but I'm not sure that would extend to FFV standards. If it does, more power to them.

Bush could also order the FFV standards by executive order as part of the War on Terror (to decrease funding to the entities that we're currently playing "dhimmi nation" to), but I'm not sure that Congress gave him such a power when they authorized the use of force in Afghanistan or Iraq. Again, it seems to be up to Congress to draw up the proper legislation or constitutional amendment.


22 posted on 02/04/2006 4:35:27 PM PST by Tolerance Sucks Rocks (Jack Murtha: America's best-known EX-marine)
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