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Gov. Blanco's speech to the Louisiana Legislature
gov.state.la.us ^ | 02/06/06 | kathleen blanco

Posted on 02/06/2006 6:51:58 PM PST by Ellesu

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To: Elyse

I'm interested in your statement that "we have no right to the offshore oil revenues". Do you mean we have no right to any additional offshore oil revenues or we have no right to any offshore oil revenues at all?


51 posted on 02/07/2006 6:28:59 AM PST by WatchOutForSnakes
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To: A Citizen Reporter; WatchOutForSnakes
She did order the evacuation. There was also a contraflow which is only done for mandatory evacuations.

08/27/2005 Saturday afternoon, after getting into town and taking care of some last minute supply issues with the fuel, food and over 12 gallons of water, I then headed out to film the evacuation. At 4:00 P.M. Interstate 10 was turned into the Contraflow. That is where all lanes of traffic on Interstate 10 flow west bound. No eastbound traffic.

08/28/2005 Less then 24 hours away and now people are taking Hurricane Katrina serious. Here is a video of the Contraflow on Interstate 10 with all lanes packed solid less then a day away from the zero hour of 7:00 AM when the power failed in downtown New Orleans. From the looks of this video, you would think there would be nobody left in the city.

52 posted on 02/07/2006 6:38:29 AM PST by CajunConservative (Don't Blame Me, I Voted for Jindal.)
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To: Ellesu
Legislators react to Governor Blanco's address

07:45 PM CST on Monday, February 6, 2006

“We’ve got to do something to unite to one levee board system in southeast Louisiana to get the federal money. Whether that will be easy to do, I don’t know. – Jane Smith, R – Bossier City.

“I think everybody agrees we should streamline if we’re going to have fewer citizens. The problem is, how many fewer citizens are we going to have? Rather than go in with a butcher’s knife and start cutting, I think we need to go with a scalpel and cut what we need to cut – no more, no less.” – Jeff Arnold, D – New Orleans, whose father Tom Arnold is a New Orleans assessor.

“Some very good ideas have been put on the table. We most definitely need to do something with the levee boards. I think something good will come from this and we’re just hoping that everyone will work together for the benefit of this area and southwest Louisiana.” -- Herman Ray Hill, D – Dry Creek

“I’m afraid up there (north Louisiana), they’re really proud that she’s doing this (trying to cut N.O.’s government). As a whole I think they’d like to streamline. We’ve got to figure out what the best thing is for New Orleans. If that’s what it takes, I’ll be for it, but I can assure you my constituents think it’s the best thing.” – Leland Kenny, D – Columbia.

“In the north, in my area, one of the main concerns is that we tackle the voting issue bill and they’re really strongly opposed to someone voting for the first time absentee without having ever voted in person.” – Jane Smith, R – Bossier City.

“We need to consolidate the governance of all these levees. It’s very, very critical. We took tours of the devastation today and it’s very widespread. We have destruction across this entire flood system. We have to have a consolidated, unified plan. We have to have highly qualified people to make these decisions. The federal government is telling us that before we spend hundreds of billions of dollars rebuilding the levees…we want to make sure our investment is safe.” – Mike Strain, R – Covington.

“I think they were nice words, but I’d like to see actions. I want her to look people in the eye, and say that I think you, more than I, can rebuild your home. I want to give people to their own money and have them build their homes. No more programs, no more studies. Whatever money we have from Congress, give it to the individual homeowner and let them rebuild their own home.” – Derrick Shepherd, D – Marrero.
53 posted on 02/07/2006 6:40:18 AM PST by LA Woman3
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To: Ellesu
First, let us secure our communities by strengthening our levees. The levees are federal levees.

It is inexcusable that our people - hardworking and patriotic American taxpayers - were asked to entrust their lives and property to a worn and broken system. We must replace false security with a reliable 21st Century hurricane protection system based on today's engineering and technology.

The state has a responsibility, too. As the Citizens for 1 Greater New Orleans know, if we expect Washington to make the lasting investment to rebuild the federal levees, then we must do our part.

You approved the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority. The CPRA is charged with overseeing levee boards statewide and developing a master plan for coastal and flood protection. Now let's take the next step.

By consolidating the levee boards in Southeast Louisiana, we have an opportunity to improve the oversight and maintenance of hurricane protection levees. Some levee boards work better than others. Some have diverted attention away from flood control to various levels of corruption and cronyism.

The people of Southeast Louisiana want and deserve a single levee board run by professionals devoted exclusively to flood protection


I'm confused......... If these are federal levees then what did the local levee boards do, what authority did they have and how was it that they spent the money allocated to levee construction and maintenance?..... Either the locals were involved in the control/decision process or they weren't.

Sounds like the Gov. is trying to insulate responsibility from the previous levee boards by saying it is federal. Where are the investigations of the prior levee boards and their actions, where are the charges, if warranted, against the previous boards/members?

Sounds like the Gov., the State Attorney General and others have some ground work to do to show the nation they are sincere.....

I think her statement in the address is appriopriate but needs action rather than just some rheotric:

Louisiana the ball is in your court.....

54 posted on 02/07/2006 6:43:40 AM PST by deport
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To: SaveTheChief
Even Galvestion doesn't come close, imo.

The Civil war took 200,000 or so combat related deaths and some 400,000 or so other deaths that may have been associated with the war along with massive destruction to the country and cities of the time... For the Gov. to compare the loss created by Katrina and say it was greater is wrong, very wrong, imo.

55 posted on 02/07/2006 7:00:42 AM PST by deport
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To: deport

The problem is misreporting. Katrina is the "costliest" natural disaster in regards to damages. Galveston was the deadliest natural disaster and of course the Civil War was the deadliest event in our history.


56 posted on 02/07/2006 7:06:24 AM PST by CajunConservative (Don't Blame Me, I Voted for Jindal.)
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To: deport

The key words in that statement being "natural disaster". The Civil War was not a natural disaster. In numbers of deaths Galveston was greater. In widespread damage and cost, Katrina and Rita were greater.


57 posted on 02/07/2006 7:25:55 AM PST by WatchOutForSnakes
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To: WatchOutForSnakes

We had talked about this in another thread the other day and I knew that bayourant would understand that I mean additional revenue.


58 posted on 02/07/2006 8:48:02 AM PST by Elyse
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To: Dog Gone
Texas already gets tax revenue from these off shore leases, much more than Louisiana. Louisiana is only asking for the same deal Texas and Florida get.

http://www.nola.com/news/t-p/editorials/index.ssf?/base/news-2/1139124215210420.xml

59 posted on 02/07/2006 9:55:03 AM PST by Saints fan
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To: Ben Ficklin

They do Ben. Please visit the link in post #59


60 posted on 02/07/2006 10:06:36 AM PST by Saints fan
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To: Dog Gone; Ben Ficklin
Try this one.

http://www.nola.com/news/t-p/frontpage/index.ssf?/base/news-5/113886577878520.xml

61 posted on 02/07/2006 10:27:57 AM PST by Saints fan
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To: Saints fan
There is a good reason why Texas' and FL's west coast ICS extends out 3 leagues.

LA is looking for 250 miles out, not 3 leagues.

In fact, everyone knows what LA is after. They think that the area to the west of Lease Area 181 and south of Louisiana will produce some Arabian grade wells. They are probably right.

62 posted on 02/07/2006 1:53:37 PM PST by Ben Ficklin
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To: Saints fan
Texas already gets tax revenue from these off shore leases, much more than Louisiana. Louisiana is only asking for the same deal Texas and Florida get.

That's completely wrong. Texas gets no money from federal offshore leases, while Louisiana already does.

Maybe Texas ought to try to get the same deal that Louisiana currently has.

63 posted on 02/07/2006 3:32:17 PM PST by Dog Gone
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To: Saints fan

Louisiana is only asking for the same deal Texas and Florida get.



Why does Louisiana not have the same deal that Tx and Fl have?


64 posted on 02/07/2006 3:35:42 PM PST by deport
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To: deport
Texas state waters extend further into the Gulf than Louisiana's. That's true, and it's always been true. Same with Florida.

But it's only about 6 miles more.

In the 60 years since offshore production began, the close-in stuff has mostly been found and produced, so it's a fairly moot point.

But somehow this historical difference of six miles of jurisdiction is used as justification for Louisiana now demanding 50% of the royalties out to the extent of US federal territorial waters.

It's a leap in logic that one can't honestly make.

65 posted on 02/07/2006 3:56:21 PM PST by Dog Gone
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To: Dog Gone
You didn't read the articles did you?

There's equity: Coastal energy producing states like Louisiana aren't getting a fair shake compared to inland states that get 50 percent of the revenue from minerals extracted from federal lands within their boundaries. Louisiana has an especially poor deal. While Texas and Florida get 100 percent of the revenue from production 9 miles in the Gulf, Louisiana has control over only the first three miles and gets 27 percent of the revenues from drilling from 3 to 6 miles out. After that, Louisiana gets nothing.

66 posted on 02/07/2006 4:02:49 PM PST by Saints fan
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To: Dog Gone

Why doeas Texas and Florida get 9 miles out and Louisiana only gets 3? Louisiana is only asking for 50% of these 6 miles. Texas and Florida get 100% of these 6 miles. Why the disparity?


67 posted on 02/07/2006 4:06:23 PM PST by Saints fan
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To: Saints fan
Ha ha, and you accuse me of not reading the articles you linked yourself.

Louisiana wants 50% extending out to edge of the continental shelf, some 200 miles offshore. Not six miles. 200 miles.

Texas and Louisiana have state waters extending further out than Louisiana because they came in under Spanish law which had previously established those state offshore boundaries prior to admittance to the union.

And I'll point out that there is very little federal land in Texas for the US government to split royalties with the state 50/50. It's mostly in private hands, and the state only gets a piece of production through ad valorem taxes, far less than 10% of the value.

68 posted on 02/07/2006 4:28:09 PM PST by Dog Gone
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To: Saints fan

http://www.nola.com/news/t-p/frontpage/index.ssf?/base/news-5/113886577878520.xml

Why the disparity..... did you read the article you linked?

Here' the article's version;

...
The Truman administration initially offered Louisiana control of the first three miles off its shores and a share of royalties beyond that. But, according to Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., Plaquemines Parish boss Leander Perez demanded all of the royalties or nothing -- and the state got nothing.

Under mounting pressure in 1953, Congress gave coastal states the rights to the waters up to 3 miles off their coasts. Texas and Florida were given control of about 9 miles in the Gulf of Mexico because they had established those boundaries before becoming states.
....

As far as the inland quote you provided in another post.... that's apples / oranges to the discussion of offshore lands.... none of which are inland to any state.


69 posted on 02/07/2006 4:30:01 PM PST by deport
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To: deport

The Civil War was not a natural disaster.


70 posted on 02/07/2006 4:34:10 PM PST by SaveTheChief
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To: Saints fan
Here's another article by Dan Juneau, President of La Association of Business and Industry, regarding the Blanco proposal.....

Dan Juneau, President of La Association of Business and Industry

71 posted on 02/07/2006 4:37:54 PM PST by deport
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To: deport; Dog Gone
"Texas and Florida were given control of about 9 miles in the Gulf of Mexico because they had established those boundaries before becoming states."

So had Louisiana...

From the “History of the Offshore Oil and Gas Industry in Southern Louisiana Interim Report, Volume I: Papers on the Evolving Offshore Industry”, Page 39

link address is :

http://www.gomr.mms.gov/homepg/regulate/environ/studies/2004/2004-049.pdf

“in August 1954, Louisiana’s state legislature had asserted those rights by passing a statute, Act No. 33, which redefined the states’s seaward boundary as a maximum of three leagues beyond the coastline, as described in the act of admission of Louisiana to statehood and union. The novel aspect of the legislation was the definition of the coastline, which the state argued was the dividing line between inland waters and the open sea as determined by the Coast Guard and authorized by acts of Congress in 1807 and 1895. The Coast Guard fixed lighthouses and buoys along this line, as the U.S. Department of Justice pointed out, for navigational purposes, to determine where ships changed from rules for the open sea and to rules for inland waters.”

Why there is a current descrepancy between the Texas and Florida limits and the Louisiana limits is beyond me. All coastal states should be treated equally under the law.

72 posted on 02/07/2006 6:09:12 PM PST by Uncle Sham
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To: Uncle Sham

I wasn't aware of that part of Louisiana history, and I don't know why it wasn't able to maintain the three league limit to state waters upon admission.

Texas had a different bargaining position as it was an independent nation seeking admission to the union on its terms, which is why the only federal land in Texas is land that was sold to the US Government (unless some land was condemned for interstate highways).

However, arguing the three league limit is a far different matter than arguing for proceeds 190 miles further out to sea than that.


73 posted on 02/07/2006 6:24:13 PM PST by Dog Gone
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To: Uncle Sham

I haven't looked at the coastline of the Pacific and Atlantic coast states.... Do you know offhand what their limits are? Don't search if you don't know offhand.

It may well be that the Perez thing may well have played into the legislation of 1953.


74 posted on 02/07/2006 6:34:31 PM PST by deport
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To: deport
I think they're all three miles, with the exception of Texas and Florida, which are three leagues or about nine miles.

One interesting aspect of Louisiana coastal erosion is the fact that the state is now claiming land that was private landowners property.

It's happened to my company, and it potentially involves the shift of millions of dollars of royalty revenues for wells drilled onshore near the coast.

The flip side for Lousiana is that it also shifts the federal boundary three miles from the new subsea lands they are now claiming.

75 posted on 02/07/2006 6:46:06 PM PST by Dog Gone
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To: deport
You'll find a complete detailed explanation of all of the states claims in legal cases. It will answer every question you might ask.

http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/getcase.pl?court=us&vol=363&invol=1

Basically, Louisiana got screwed by the feds. Here's an excerpt...

"Louisiana's claims, like those of Texas, are based on the contention that it had a three-league maritime boundary which existed "at the time" it was admitted to the Union, and must be judged by the same standards.

The Act of Congress admitting the State to the Union in 1812 107a described the new State's boundaries as follows:

"beginning at the mouth of the river Sabine; thence, by a line to be drawn along the middle of said river, including all islands to the thirty-second degree of latitude; thence, due north, to the northernmost part of the thirty-third degree of north latitude; thence, along the said parallel of latitude, to the river Mississippi; thence, down the said river, to the river Iberville; and from thence, along the middle of the said river, and lakes Maurepas and Ponchartrain, to the gulf of Mexico; thence, bounded by the said gulf, to the place of beginning, including all islands within three leagues of the coast . . . ." (Emphasis added.)

Louisiana claims that the concluding clause "including all islands within three leagues of the coast" should be read to mean that Congress fixed as the State's seaward boundary a line three leagues from its coast, and that such a reading is supported both by the State's preadmission history and by subsequent events.

The Government, on the other hand, insists that the phrase includes only the islands themselves lying within three leagues of the coast, and not all waters within that distance as well."

Texas had other treaties and documents to back up it's claims. Unequal treatment is the net result.

76 posted on 02/07/2006 7:32:06 PM PST by Uncle Sham
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To: CajunConservative
"There was also a contraflow which is only done for mandatory evacuations."

Ah, thank you. I can see that contraflow is the buzz word for the Blanco defense.

77 posted on 02/07/2006 8:49:51 PM PST by A Citizen Reporter
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To: A Citizen Reporter

It's not defense of Blanko, it's simply stating the truth. Whether you agree or not is not my problem. The problem was she didn't issue the mandatory evacuation sooner.


78 posted on 02/08/2006 8:58:10 AM PST by CajunConservative (Don't Blame Me, I Voted for Jindal.)
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