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Google's new search feature seeks greater access to personal computers
Canadian Press ^ | February 9, 2006 | Michael Liedtke

Posted on 02/10/2006 12:50:45 AM PST by WaterDragon

Google Inc. is offering a new tool that will automatically transfer information from one personal computer to another.

Anyone wanting that convenience, however, must authorize the Internet search leader to store the material for up to 30 days. That compromise, sought as part of a free software upgrade released Thursday, might be more difficult to swallow now that the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush is demanding to know what kind of information people have been hunting through Google's search engine.

Google is fighting the Justice Department's subpoena in a federal court battle that's focusing more attention on the risks of personal information held by Internet companies being turned over to outside sources, including the government.

Yahoo Inc., Microsoft Corp. and Time Warner Inc.'s America Online already have surrendered some of the information requested by the Bush administration.

All three companies have said their co-operation didn't violate users' privacy.

The ability to search a computer remotely is included in Google's latest upgrade to its software that scours hard drives for documents, e-mails, instant messages and an assortment of other information.

To enable the computer-to-computer search function, a user specifies what information should be indexed and then agrees to allow Google to transfer the material to its own storage system.

Google plans to encrypt all data transferred from users' hard drives and restrict access to just a handful of its employees.

The company says it won't peruse any of the transferred information.....[more]


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Constitution/Conservatism; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Government; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; Political Humor/Cartoons
KEYWORDS: access; google; information; stored; trust

1 posted on 02/10/2006 12:50:48 AM PST by WaterDragon
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To: WaterDragon

This sounds like a very bad bad bad idea.


2 posted on 02/10/2006 1:00:41 AM PST by bayourant
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To: bayourant

Well not only is it a bad idea for personal privacy reasons, but technically it is a non-starter. There simply isn't a need for it, except for the nearly computer-illiterate who don't understand that there are easier ways to transfer data from one system to another, depending on just how much data we're talking about.


3 posted on 02/10/2006 1:04:09 AM PST by mkjessup (The Shah doesn't look so bad now, eh? But nooo, Jimmah said the Ayatollah was a 'godly' man.)
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To: bayourant

Do ya mind sharing your credit card and Soc.Sec. number with me too? Of course I am an honest guy.


4 posted on 02/10/2006 1:05:22 AM PST by Paulus
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To: WaterDragon
Google plans to encrypt all data transferred from users' hard drives and restrict access to just a handful of its employees.

Sorry, but I don't want ONE Google employee having access to my files. It's a hardcore leftist company, and we've seen countless examples of how morals and principles don't apply to leftists. If their cause is worthy (in their twisted minds), then all is fair.

No, thanks.

MM

5 posted on 02/10/2006 1:14:51 AM PST by MississippiMan (Behold now behemoth...he moves his tail like a cedar. Job 40:17)
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To: MississippiMan

You can't have OUR information but we want YOUR information.

Yeah like always the lefties want their cake, they just steal your plate, your fork, your piece of cake, before you even get it, tell you not to complain then send you a bill for the cake you never recieved.


6 posted on 02/10/2006 1:23:30 AM PST by Michael121 (An old soldier knows the truth. Only a Dead Soldier knows peace.)
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To: WaterDragon

Previously reported here:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1575723/posts


7 posted on 02/10/2006 1:34:00 AM PST by adamsjas
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To: WaterDragon

Google yes to China
Google yes to liberals
Google yes to your private information

What is good about Google?


8 posted on 02/10/2006 1:53:19 AM PST by kentj
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To: MississippiMan

: ) i would like for google to go via the stock bubble

am i bad


9 posted on 02/10/2006 3:41:46 AM PST by Flavius (Qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum)
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To: kentj

I don't understand the "Google yes to liberals" comment.

Google's only problem (as I see it) is that they are extremely good at what they do. They are enormously popular because of their products (which I haven't paid for directly, as far as I know, since I have never bought anything through a Google advertisement).

It wasn't long ago that people were trashing Microsoft for being successful. (they still do, in fact)

Fact is, I won't be using such a service because of its privacy implications, and am computer-literate enough to know better ways of transferring data. There are those that aren't and I am sure that if personal information were revealed to the wrong parties, the Congress will be sure to "call for a protection law"....like we always need to protect people from their own ignorance. Metaphorically, this service is the "deep end of the pool" to those that don't know how to swim, and I am not a lifeguard.


10 posted on 02/10/2006 4:00:39 AM PST by RangerM (Perhaps he was comfortable within his skin)
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To: WaterDragon

Sure enough; it's Bush's fault again.


11 posted on 02/10/2006 4:01:51 AM PST by RoadTest ("- - a popular government cannot flourish without virtue in the people." - Richard Henry Lee, 1786)
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To: WaterDragon
I have just set up my two web sites to prevent any access by google. I won't miss it.

I will research my firewall to see if I can do the same for my personal computer.

12 posted on 02/10/2006 4:16:33 AM PST by Banjoguy (I will rot in Hell before I buy another Dell!)
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To: Banjoguy

Question is Google toolbar the desktop software or is that another program?


13 posted on 02/10/2006 4:18:03 AM PST by stopem
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To: stopem
I have now set up my personal computer firewall (Zonealarm) to block any access from ip address http://64.233.161.99 which is Google.

I set up both of my web sites to deny access to the Google search engine.

I think, that the Google desktop is another program which runs in the background.

..gotten to where I just don't trust a search engine having to do with Google, Yahoo or Microsoft...entirely too devious..like the fox guarding the henhouse.

14 posted on 02/10/2006 4:31:15 AM PST by Banjoguy (I will rot in Hell before I buy another Dell!)
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To: stopem
Question is Google toolbar the desktop software or is that another program?

A program...don't install it; (but if you do, block the program's access to the internet.)

15 posted on 02/10/2006 4:35:35 AM PST by Banjoguy (I will rot in Hell before I buy another Dell!)
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To: RangerM

So did you buy low or high - research their politics they are as left as the left gets in the US.

I am not slamming there service it is their politics - they are liberals - it is that simple - they support liberal causes, as a company I will say it again they are liberal.

Now as far as the value - well - pop fizzel they have not seen the bottom yet - their capital may save them but not on the merits of what they do at Google - they are scrambling to diversify and divest the sky is not falling however the roof is and the bubble has a big ass hole in it and only foolish ignore the numbers.

Like you a lot of people have bought nothing due to Google's efforts - it takes a while for the ripple effect to mature but the tidal wave has come ashore and guess what it is not over.


16 posted on 02/10/2006 4:46:38 AM PST by kentj
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To: Banjoguy

Thanks for the info,
I think I will delete Googles toolbar.


17 posted on 02/10/2006 5:18:06 AM PST by stopem
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To: WaterDragon

I've used Clusty.com ever since I found out what a bunch of lefties Google are.


18 posted on 02/10/2006 5:55:40 AM PST by agere_contra
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To: WaterDragon
administration of U.S. President George W. Bush is demanding to know what kind of information people have been hunting through Google's search engine

"What" but not "who". A fricking pie chart with no names. Evil stuff....

19 posted on 02/10/2006 6:04:40 AM PST by RGSpincich
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To: mkjessup

This is beside the point and I'm not looking for an exhaustive answer, but being a computer illiterate I have often wondered about that very thing. Just what are the easier ways to transfer data from one system to another? Like from my old pc to my new one?


20 posted on 02/10/2006 6:30:17 AM PST by Graymatter
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To: Graymatter; mkjessup

Methods of searching our transferring data on other computers should be dependent on the nature of the data and how it’s stored, dispersed and used. Solutions vary from central repositories, private networks or virtual private networks and remote login tools like PC Anywhere, Carbon Copy and http://www.gotomypc.com. Each of those suffer from being either cumbersome to install, use or secure.

Google’s tool seems like a very good solution in limited circumstances, and AFAIK it’s not promoted for other circumstances that would make it a security threat. It might be useful to teams working on a school or research project or any other kind of file sharing where privacy from the government or an organization with much better things to do than watch you isn’t an issue. Like the existing Google Desktop search, I’m sure it allows you to specify what folders to share or not share.

If you’re politically active, working with financial or business data, you probably want to go with something more private.


21 posted on 02/10/2006 9:49:41 AM PST by elfman2
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To: WaterDragon

bump


22 posted on 02/10/2006 9:50:26 AM PST by VOA
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To: WaterDragon

Let's see. . . Yahoo turned over its records to government scrutiny. Google is going to effectively do the same thing. What's left? Lycos? Alta Vista? Are there any "secure" search engines anymore?


23 posted on 02/10/2006 9:52:34 AM PST by Euro-American Scum (A poverty-stricken middle class must be a disarmed middle class)
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To: adamsjas

Didn't show up in a search because that's a different headline for the article (if it's the same exact one) in a different publication.


24 posted on 02/10/2006 4:29:34 PM PST by WaterDragon
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