Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

To: raygun
A typical blade edge, which is not razor sharp, is about one-eighth of an inch wide and about 12 inches long, yielding a surface area of 1.5 square inches each or 3 square inches for two blades.

Figure skates and hockey skates have a curved blade. The pressure exerted by them would be much higher, due to the much smaller surface area in contact with the ice. I'm surprised these scientists either don't know this or failed to mention/consider it.

Yes, ice is slippery even in contact with shoes. But compare the two. You will travel much further gliding on ice skates than you will in your wingtips. There seems to be something to the pressure and/or friction angle after all.

19 posted on 02/21/2006 7:34:37 AM PST by TChris ("Unless you act, you're going to lose your world." - Mark Steyn)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]


To: TChris

Not only that, but as I'm sure you know, the surface of the blade that contacts the ice is not flat side to side (ie the cross section), but concave, so that the part actually touching the ice is very thin.


21 posted on 02/21/2006 8:04:32 AM PST by -YYZ-
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies ]

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article


FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson