Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Adversary Culture: The perverse anti-Westernism of the cultural elite
The Sydney Line ^ | 2/11/06 | Keith Windschuttle

Posted on 02/25/2006 7:00:43 PM PST by TFFKAMM

Address to: Summer Sounds Symposium
Punga Cove, New Zealand
February 11 2006

For the past three decades and more, many of the leading opinion makers in our universities, the media and the arts have regarded Western culture as, at best, something to be ashamed of, or at worst, something to be opposed. Before the 1960s, if Western intellectuals reflected on the long-term achievements of their culture, they explained it in terms of its own evolution: the inheritance of ancient Greece, Rome and Christianity, tempered by the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment and the scientific and industrial revolutions. Even a radical critique like Marxism was primarily an internal affair, intent on fulfilling what it imagined to be the destiny of the West, taking its history to what it thought would be a higher level.

Today, however, such thinking is dismissed by the prevailing intelligentsia as triumphalist. Western political and economic dominance is more commonly explained not by its internal dynamics but by its external behaviour, especially its rivalry and aggression towards other cultures. Western success has purportedly been at their expense. Instead of pushing for internal reform or revolution, this new radicalism constitutes an overwhelmingly negative critique of Western civilization itself.

According to this ideology, instead of attempting to globalise its values, the West should stay in its own cultural backyard. Values like universal human rights, individualism and liberalism are regarded merely as ethnocentric products of Western history. The scientific knowledge that the West has produced is simply one of many “ways of knowing”. In place of Western universalism, this critique offers cultural relativism, a concept that regards the West not as the pinnacle of human achievement to date, but as simply one of many equally valid cultural systems.

Cultural relativism claims there are no absolute standards for assessing human culture. Hence all cultures should be regarded as equal, though different. It comes in two varieties: soft and hard.

The soft version now prevails in aesthetics. Take a university course in literary criticism or art theory and you will now find traditional standards no longer apply. Italian opera can no longer be regarded as superior to Chinese opera. The theatre of Shakespeare was not better than that of Kabuki, only different.

The hard version comes from the social sciences and from cultural studies. Cultural practices from which most Westerners instinctively shrink are now accorded their own integrity, lest the culture that produced them be demeaned.

For instance, although Western feminists once found the overt misogyny of many tribal cultures distasteful, in recent years they have come to respect practices they once condemned. Feminist academics now deny that suttee, the incineration of widows, is barbaric. The Indian-American cultural studies theorist, Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak gives suttee an honourable place in Indian culture by comparing it to the Christian tradition of martyrdom. Feminists once denounced the surgical removal of the clitoris of Muslim women as female genital mutilation. Lately, the procedure has been redefined as genital “cutting”, which the literary and art critic Germaine Greer now argues should be recognized as an authentic manifestation of the culture of the Muslim women concerned.

Similarly, the Parisian literary theorist, Tzvetan Todorov, in The Conquest of America (1985), compares Mexican cannibalism to the Christian Eucharist, and the Australian postmodern historian, Greg Dening, in Mr Bligh's Bad Language (1992), declares Polynesian human sacrifice to be the ritual equivalent of British capital punishment.

Something is obviously going terribly wrong here. The logic of relativism is taking Western academics into dark waters. They are now prepared to countenance practices that are obviously cruel, unnatural and life-denying, that is, practices that offend against all they claim to stand for.

To see how decadent these assumptions have become, compare today's relativism to the attitude that prevailed when the culture of the British people was in its ascendancy. Sir Charles Napier, the British Commander-in-chief in India from 1849 to 1851, signed an agreement with local Hindu leaders that he would respect all their customs, except for the practice of suttee. The Hindu leaders protested but Napier was unmoved:

You say that it is your custom to burn widows. Very well. We also have a custom: when men burn a woman alive, we tie a rope around their necks and we hang them. Build your funeral pyre; beside it, my carpenters will build a gallows. You may follow your custom. And then we will follow ours.

The moral rationale of cultural relativism is a plea for tolerance and respect of other cultures, no matter how uncomfortable we might be with their beliefs and practices. However, there is one culture conspicuous by its absence from all this. The plea for acceptance and open-mindedness does not extend to Western culture itself, whose history is regarded as little more than a crime against the rest of humanity. The West cannot judge other cultures but must condemn its own.

Since the 1960s, academic historians on the left have worked to generate a widespread cynicism about the nature of Western democracies, with the aim of questioning their legitimacy and undermining their ability to command loyalty. Let me demonstrate some of the ways in which national and imperial histories are being used to denigrate Western culture and society and give the nations of the West, especially those descended from Britain, an historical identity of which they can only be ashamed.

Academic historians today argue that all the new white settler societies established under the British Empire in Africa, the Pacific and North America shared the same racist attitudes towards outsiders and dispensed the same degree of violence against indigenous peoples. Today, they often compare the European settler societies with Nazi Germany.

This form of moral equivalence originated in the 1960s in the work of the American political theorist Pierre van den Berghe and his book Race and Racism. He defined all the British settler societies as ‘ herrenvolk democracies'. Herrenvolk is German for “master race”. These societies were egalitarian democracies, van den Berghe conceded, but only for people of their own kind. To preserve egalitarian ideals in the face of their exploitation of the land and labour of the coloured races, the settler democracies defined the latter as less than human. Van den Berghe wrote, these are “regimes such as those of the United States or South Africa that are democratic for the master race but tyrannical for the subordinate groups.”

The attitude to the indigenous people in the colonies, academic historians now assure us, was genocidal. The Australian academic journal Aboriginal History in 2001 published a special “genocide” edition. In their introduction, the editors argued that European colonialism was an even more intrinsically genocidal process than that of Nazi Germany. Using evidence put forward by the American academic Ward Churchill, the editors argue that England was the most “overtly genocidal” of the European colonial powers.

Moreover, they assert, “settler-colonies around the world established during European expansion post-1492 in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Argentina are not only potentially but inherently genocidal.” [their emphasis]

The worst-case scenario in Australia is widely regarded as the island of Tasmania, where a Black War was supposedly fought in the 1820s and 1830s and where the last full-blood Aboriginal person died in 1888, though significant numbers of part Aboriginal descendants survive to this day. The historian Lyndall Ryan says in her 1981 book The Aboriginal Tasmanians that they were the victims of “a conscious policy of genocide”. This is the orthodox opinion among Australian academics.

In 2001 and 2002 I undertook the task of checking the footnotes of the major authors on Tasmania to verify their original sources, I found to my surprise that their interpretation of frontier warfare and genocide was based on invented incidents, concocted footnotes, altered documents and gross exaggeration of the Aboriginal death toll. I could find credible evidence that white settlers had killed a total of 121 Aborigines, mostly in self defence or in hot pursuit of Aborigines who had killed or assaulted white settlers. The rest of the population of about 2000 natives had died from diseases to which their long isolation on their island had given them no immunity, principally influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis. On top of this, venereal disease rendered most of the women infertile.

The Tasmanian colony had been founded in 1803 in the middle of the British campaign to end the slave trade. Its longest-serving governor was George Arthur, a supporter of William Wilberforce, and who in his previous post in British Honduras had set the colony's indigenous slaves free. His sensitivity to the native question, in fact, was what got him the job in Australia. He wanted to civilize and modernize the Aborigines, not exterminate them. His intentions were not to foster violence towards the Aborigines but to prevent it. The charge of genocide is not only wrong, it is maliciously wrong — the defamation of a good man and a wilful misrepresentation of the truth.

What sort of ethical universe do the people who make this charge inhabit? As I noted, the assertion by the editors of Aboriginal History that the British settler societies were more intrinsically genocidal than Nazi Germany was based on an analysis of colonialism by Ward Churchill of the University of Colorado. Churchill is also treated as a citable authority by three separate authors in the recent anthology Genocide and Settler Society, edited by Dirk Moses of the University of Sydney, who describes Churchill as “a Native American activist and scholar.”

Their reverence for this person is revealing. In February last year, Churchill briefly became America 's most reviled university teacher for declaring that those who died in New York 's World Trade Centre on September 11 2001 had deserved their fate. Churchill wrote:

If there was a better, more effective, or in fact any other way of visiting some penalty befitting their participation upon the little Eichmanns inhabiting the sterile sanctuary of the twin towers, I'd really be interested in hearing about it.

In the ensuing controversy, Churchill was exposed by real American Indians as a fake. The American Indian Grand Governing Council said “Ward Churchill has fraudulently represented himself as an Indian, and a member of the American Indian Movement and … has been masquerading as an Indian for years behind his dark glasses and beaded headband.”

More importantly, a University of New Mexico specialist in Indian law, John Lavelle, accused Churchill of fabricating evidence in no less than six books and eleven published academic articles.

That the work of such a moral bankrupt and scholarly charlatan could be paraded as weighty commentary by the editors of Australia 's leading journal in Aboriginal history is a good indication of what an intellectual shambles this subject has become.

The anti-colonialism of these historians is also highly selective in that it ignores empires other than those of Europe. The truth is that all great civilizations have absorbed other peoples, sometimes in harmony, sometimes by the sword. The Islamic world, so often portrayed today as victims of British or American or Israeli imperialism, is hardly innocent. The Ottoman Turks conquered and ruled most of the Middle East for a thousand years. The British and the French displaced them in the nineteenth and early twentieth century, with the approval of the Arabs who by then wanted liberation from Ottoman rule. In India, Muslims from Arabia and Persia were imperial overlords for eight centuries until the British arrived. The British overthrew Muslim rule, with the active co-operation and grateful applause of the Hindu population.

The Arabs themselves were not indigenous to most of the regions they now populate. Before the Turks, they were an imperial power who arose out of the Arabian Peninsula in the seventh century to conquer the Middle East, North Africa, South Asia and Southern Europe where they either subjugated or slaughtered the local population. None of this history provokes any censure from the critics of imperialism today, who reserve their reproaches exclusively for the European variety.

Until the 1960s, most people brought up within Western culture believed that its literature, its art and its music were among the glories of its civilization. Today, much of the academic debate about the Western literary heritage claims that it is politically contaminated. Some of these charges are well known because they offended against the ideological triumvirate of gender, race and class: Othello is ethnocentric, Paradise Lost is a feminist tragedy, Jane Eyre is both racist and sexist.

Western literature is today most severely rebuked for its alleged support of imperialism. The theorist making this accusation is the late Edward Said. He claims the flowering of European literature since the sixteenth century either directly endorsed or provided a supportive environment for the expansion of Europe in the same period.

In his book Culture and Imperialism Said claims that, of all modern literary forms, it is the novel that has been most culpable in reproducing and advocating the power relations of empire. His critique encompasses not only novels that are overtly about imperial affairs, such as those of Joseph Conrad and Rudyard Kipling, but even the work of such apparently domestic writers as Jane Austen and Charles Dickens. One of Jane Austen's characters in Mansfield Park, Sir Thomas Bertram, owns a sugar plantation in the Caribbean, so this implicates her in support of slavery, Said claims. In Great Expectations, Charles Dickens despatches one of his characters to Australia and another to Egypt, so the fact that he thinks like this makes him an imperialist author, too.

Said extends his critique to opera, which he describes as an art form “that belongs equally to the history of culture and the historical experience of overseas domination”. Because Giuseppe Verdi's Aida is set in ancient Egypt, Said claims it fosters military aggression towards the Orient. It contains “imperialist structures of attitude and reference” that act as an “anaesthetic” on European audiences, leading them to ignore the brutality that accompanied their conquest of other countries.

Equally culpable are European paintings of the Orient, even those of Delacroix and Ingres, which critics once thought portrayed the region in romantically admiring terms. Instead, art critics who follow Said now use them as examples of subtle and persistent Eurocentric prejudice against Islamic people and their culture. These paintings are purportedly a reflection of European arrogance and Western prejudices: “the idea of Oriental decay, the subjection of women, an unaccountable legal system — pictorial rhetoric that served a subtle imperialist agenda”.

Presented like this, stripped of their theoretical obfuscation, the ideas are transparently crude. They resemble the reductionism of one-time Marxist criticism, which invariably saw Western art and literature as expressions of “nothing but” the venal interests of the ruling class or the bourgeoisie. They also stretch interpretation beyond credulity.

The idea that, because Jane Austen presents one plantation-owning character, of whom heroine, plot and author all plainly disapprove, she thereby becomes a handmaiden of imperialism and slavery, is to misunderstand both the novel and the biography of its author, who was an ardent opponent of the slave trade. Similarly, to argue that because Charles Dickens uses some overseas locations as convenient off-stage sites to advance his plots, he thereby become an advocate of empire, is to give him attitudes he never expressed. To claim that the art form of opera or the romantic indulgence of the nineteenth century Orientalist school of painting derives from the European experience of overseas domination is to make an ideological misreading of them all.

Aida, for instance, is a story of star-crossed lovers set in 3000 BC amidst a war between the Egyptians and the Abyssinians, in which the Egyptians triumph. To claim that it sanctifies nineteenth century European imperialism against Egypt in which, this time, the Egyptians lose, is to abandon any sense of either perspective or logic.

As well as aesthetics, there is an economic dimension to this ideology. It believes Western prosperity is based on ill-gotten gains. We are rich because they are poor. Western imperialism exploited what is now the Third World and made the industrial revolution through the wealth it purloined.

One of the most celebrated authors in this genre is Andre Gunder Frank whose book ReOrient: Global Economy in the Asian Age (1998) denies that the industrial revolution was the product of European entrepreneurship, ingenuity and technological innovation. “ Europe did not pull itself up by its own economic bootstraps,” Frank writes. Instead, he claims: “Europe climbed up on the back of Asia, then stood on Asian shoulders — temporarily.”

Fortunately, we now have an analysis that convincingly demolishes claims of this kind. Niall Ferguson's 2003 book Empire is a history of British imperialism which demonstrates that Britain 's imperial record is not merely nothing to be ashamed of, but was a positive force that “made the modern world”. The history of the empire was characterized by the global spread of trade and wealth, technological and cultural modernization, and the growth of liberalism and democracy.

Imperialism encouraged investors to put their money in developing economies, places that would otherwise have been sites of great risk. The extension of the British empire into the less developed world had the effect of reducing this risk by imposing some form of British rule.

When the British Empire was at the peak of its influence, it was a much greater force for international investment in the underdeveloped world than any of today's institutions. In 1913, some 25 per cent of the world stock of capital was invested in poor countries. By 1997 that figure was only 5 per cent.

Britain exported to the world the systems of finance, transportation and manufacturing that it had developed at home. Rather than a form of plunder that depleted the economies that came under its influence, British imperialism injected many of the institutions of modernisation into the territories it controlled. British investment financed the development not only of white dominions in North America, Australasia and South America, but also India, Africa and east Asia. It provided the infrastructure of ports, roads, railways and communications that allowed these regions access to the modern world, plus a legal system to ensure that the commerce thereby generated was orderly.

European imperialism ended in the 1940s and 1950s. The non-West has now had half a century to try its own economic prescriptions. The fact that many of these countries have not progressed beyond the kick-start provided by European colonial investment can no longer be blamed on the West. Those who have chosen to emulate the Western model, such as South Korea, Taiwan and Singapore, have shown that it is possible to transform a backward Third World country into a prosperous, modern, liberal democratic nation in as little as two generations. Those countries that still wallow in destitution and underdevelopment do so not because of Western imperialism, racism or oppression, but because of policies they have largely chosen themselves by socialist planning or had forced upon them by civil war and revolution.

The anti-Westernism of which I am speaking is not only about the past but has as much to say about current affairs.

The aftermath to the assaults on New York and Washington on September 11 2001 provided a stark illustration of its values. Within days of the terrorist assault, a number of influential Western intellectuals, including Noam Chomsky, Susan Sontag and youthful counterparts such as Naomi Klein of the anti-globalisation protest movement, responded in ways that, morally and symbolically, were no different to the celebrations of the crowds on the streets of Palestine and Islamabad who cheered as they watched the towers of the World Trade Centre come crashing down. Stripped of its obligatory jargon, their argument was straightforward: America deserved what it got.

Perhaps the worst single response to September 11 was made, I am sorry to say, by an Australian. In his column in the London magazine New Statesman, John Pilger said the real terrorists were not Muslim radicals but the Americans themselves. Pilger wrote:

If the attacks on America have their source in the Islamic world, who can be surprised? … Far from being the terrorists of the world, the Islamic peoples have been its victims — that is, the victims of American fundamentalism, whose power, in all its forms — military, strategic and economic — is the greatest source of terrorism on earth.

The English radical feminist Beatrix Campbell engaged in the same kind of blame shifting. She claimed “the victims of September 11 are also the architects of a mess of their own making”. In other words, those killed by the terrorists — including the women and children — brought their deaths upon themselves.

In fact, feminist authors were more prominent than most in blaming the United States for the attacks. One of the most publicised responses was made in Canada at a Women's Resistance Conference where a former president of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women, Sunera Thobani, directed her comments not at the Al Qaeda network but at the Bush administration. Thobani told a cheering audience that they should oppose the American war on terrorism. She said women must

reject this kind of jingoistic militarism and recognise that as the most heinous form of patriarchal racist violence that we're seeing on the globe today… There will be no emancipation for women anywhere on this planet until the Western domination of this planet is ended.

September 11 also gave some feminists the opportunity to apply their theoretical assumptions to the symbolism of the events. A columnist for the London Times, Mary Ann Sieghart, said she was struck by how the attack left men much angrier and emotional than women. The reason, she said, was:

The twin towers are two huge phallic symbols, populated with mainly men, most of whom are in the macho business of making money. They were then attacked by two more phallic symbols — jet airliners — and soon after are cut to their bases … How much more emasculating could a terrorist's action be?

These comments derive, of course, from the well-known feminist insight that a phallic symbol is anything longer than it is wide.

Another female contributor was the Indian novelist Arundhati Roy, who used the attacks to allow all of her hitherto suppressed anti-American bile to come to the surface. She said Osama bin Laden and George W. Bush were moral equivalents. She denounced America 's

chilling disregard for non-American lives, its barbarous military interventions, its support for despotic and dictatorial regimes, its merciless economic agenda that has munched through the economies of poor countries like a cloud of locusts.

It was left to novelist Salman Rushdie to rescue the reputation of the subcontinent's literary community. Rushdie said:

Let's be clear about why this anti-American onslaught is such appalling rubbish. Terrorism is the murder of the innocent; this time it was mass murder. To excuse such an atrocity by blaming US government policies is to deny the basic idea of all morality: that individuals are responsible for their actions. Furthermore, terrorism is not the pursuit of legitimate complaints by illegitimate means. The terrorist wraps himself in the world's grievances to cloak his true motives.

As no one should need reminding, Rushdie was the first target in the contemporary rise of Islamic radicalism. In 1989 he was the subject of a death edict by Iran 's Ayatollah Khomeini for satirising the prophet Mohammad in his novel The Satanic Verses. A number of Muslims living in the West declared they were willing to carry out the death sentence on behalf of their religion.

While a number of Western writers gave Rushdie vocal support and pointed out how such a fatwa offended the very core of Western culture, its right to free expression and free enquiry. But prominent politicians took a different line.

President George Bush Snr adopted the moral equivalence and cultural relativism of the prevailing political class, declaring both the death edict and the novel equally “offensive”. Former president Jimmy Carter responded with a call for Americans to be “sensitive to the concern and anger” of Muslims.

Rushdie had to spend the next decade in disguise, living in secret locations, under police protection. He announced he had become a Muslim convert, but even this was not enough to have the fatwa withdrawn. No one else followed him by writing a novel criticising Mohammad.

More recently, when a Pakistani writer living in the West decided to write a book, Why I Am Not a Muslim, rejecting Islam and praising Western culture, he knew he had to adopt the pseudonym, Ibn Warraq, and keep his identity secret.

In Holland, the former Somali woman, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, wrote a book, The Son Factory, about the Muslim oppression of women. The book generated a spate of death threats. Although she subsequently became a member of parliament, the threats to her life mean she still lives under permanent armed guard in a secret government safe house.

The death threats Hirsi Ali received were genuine. Police later found she was at the top of a hit list of Dutch public figures. The assassin Mohammed Bouyeri had her as his preferred victim but, when he couldn't reach her, he went to the name second on the hit list, the filmmaker Theo van Gogh. Bouyeri shot, stabbed and almost beheaded van Gogh, whose offence had been to collaborate with Hirsi Ali on a film entitled Submission critical of Muslim violence towards women.

The tactic of targeting individuals who criticise Islam has been very effective in Holland. In early 2005, the Dutch law professor and newspaper columnist Paul Cliteur announced he would no longer write or speak in public because of death threats to his wife and children. For similar reasons, the former Iranian academic and newspaper writer, Afshin Ellian, who lectures at the University of Leiden, now has a bodyguard accompanying him on campus at all times. Every morning the building where he teaches is swept by security services.

This personal terrorism affects not just those directly under threat, but all writers and intellectuals. Most are unable to afford the security costs and the state cannot protect them all. The result is that they are silenced by self-censorship.

This is why the debate over the Danish cartoons is so important. To date, the response has been mixed. Newspapers in Norway, Germany, France, New Zealand and Australia have reproduced the cartoons in defiance of the violence that has been perpetrated in Middle Eastern countries and threatened in many Western countries by crowds with signs such as: “Slay those who insult Islam.” “Butcher those who mock Islam.” and “Be prepared for the real holocaust.”

But many Western politicians have urged appeasement. British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw said: “The republication of these cartoons has been unnecessary, it has been insensitive, it has been disrespectful and it has been wrong.” In New Zealand, Prime Minister Helen Clark accused the newspapers involved of “bad manners”. In Australia, Attorney-General Phillip Ruddock urged newspapers not to act “gratuitously with a view to try and provoke a response”.

The real problem here was not the Western newspapers who published the cartoons but the Islamic response to them. Our political leaders did not blame the latter but turned the responsibility onto ourselves. Enclosed by a mindset of cultural relativism, most Westerners are loath to censure Muslims who go on violent rampages, burn down embassies and threaten death to their fellow citizens. Many of us regard this as somehow understandable, even acceptable, since we have no right to judge another religion and culture.

The truth is that the riots, the arson, the death threats were not spontaneous outbursts from passionate religious believers but were carefully stage-managed by Muslim leaders. The imams of the Danish Muslim community consciously ignited the response some four months after the cartoons were published. They travelled to the Middle East where they generated support for a campaign quite deliberately targeted at Western culture's principle of freedom of expression.

Their real aim is not religious respect but cultural change in the West. They want to prevent criticism of its Muslim minority and accord that group special privilege not available to the faithful of other religions. Instead of them changing to integrate into our way of life, they want to force us to change to accept their way of life.

Muslim rage over the cartoons is not an isolated issue that would have been confined to Denmark and would have gone away if nobody had republished them. It is simply one more step in a campaign that has already included assassination, death threats and the curtailment of criticism. And our response, yet again, has been one more white flag in the surrender of Western cultural values that we have been making since Khomeini's fatwa against Rushdie in 1989.

The Western concept of freedom of speech is not an absolute. The limits that should be imposed by good taste, social responsibility and respect for others will always be a matter for debate. But this is a debate that needs to be conducted within Western culture, not imposed on it from outside by threats of death and violence by those who want to put an end to all free debate.

The concepts of free enquiry and free expression and the right to criticise entrenched beliefs are things we take so much for granted they are almost part of the air we breathe. We need to recognise them as distinctly Western phenomena. They were never produced by Confucian or Hindu culture. Under Islam, the idea of objective inquiry had a brief life in the fourteenth century but was never heard of again. In the twentieth century, the first thing that every single communist government in the world did was suppress it.

But without this concept, the world would not be as it is today. There would have been no Copernicus, Galileo, Newton or Darwin. All of these thinkers profoundly offended the conventional wisdom of their day, and at great personal risk, in some cases to their lives but in all cases to their reputations and careers. But because they inherited a culture that valued free inquiry and free expression, it gave them the strength to continue.

Today, we live in an age of barbarism and decadence. There are barbarians outside the walls who want to destroy us and there is a decadent culture within. We are only getting what we deserve. The relentless critique of the West which has engaged our academic left and cultural elite since the 1960s has emboldened our adversaries and at the same time sapped our will to resist. The consequences of this adversary culture are all around us. The way to oppose it, however, is less clear. The survival of the Western principles of free inquiry and free expression now depend entirely on whether we have the intelligence to understand their true value and the will to face down their enemies.


TOPICS: Australia/New Zealand; Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Philosophy; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: academia; antiwestern; culturalsuicide; deconstructionism; hateamericaleft; idiotarian; islam; keithwindschuttle; left; liberal; mentalillness; multiculturalism; nihilism; pomo; postmodernism; selfloathing; stuckinthe60s; terrorism; thewest; windschuttle

1 posted on 02/25/2006 7:00:49 PM PST by TFFKAMM
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM
Instead of pushing for internal reform or revolution, this new radicalism constitutes an overwhelmingly negative critique of Western civilization itself.

Unable to add anything to the discussion, new radicalism vents it's impotence by tearing down what others have contributed.

2 posted on 02/25/2006 7:05:04 PM PST by GOPJ (Hollywood has jumped the shark...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GOPJ
Yup. Just like this guy, photographed the night after the '04 election -- no ideas, no plans, just a bilious contempt for the culture and civilization that keeps his spoiled butt fed and protected.
3 posted on 02/25/2006 7:15:52 PM PST by TFFKAMM
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM
These last words are important:

"The concepts of free enquiry and free expression and the right to criticise entrenched beliefs are things we take so much for granted they are almost part of the air we breathe. We need to recognise them as distinctly Western phenomena. They were never produced by Confucian or Hindu culture. Under Islam, the idea of objective inquiry had a brief life in the fourteenth century but was never heard of again. In the twentieth century, the first thing that every single communist government in the world did was suppress it.

But without this concept, the world would not be as it is today. There would have been no Copernicus, Galileo, Newton or Darwin. All of these thinkers profoundly offended the conventional wisdom of their day, and at great personal risk, in some cases to their lives but in all cases to their reputations and careers. But because they inherited a culture that valued free inquiry and free expression, it gave them the strength to continue.

Today, we live in an age of barbarism and decadence. There are barbarians outside the walls who want to destroy us and there is a decadent culture within. We are only getting what we deserve. The relentless critique of the West which has engaged our academic left and cultural elite since the 1960s has emboldened our adversaries and at the same time sapped our will to resist. The consequences of this adversary culture are all around us. The way to oppose it, however, is less clear. The survival of the Western principles of free inquiry and free expression now depend entirely on whether we have the intelligence to understand their true value and the will to face down their enemies."

Multiculturalism seeks to equalze cultures. Western Civilization has given much to the World. It is important to remember where we came from and maintain our pride in our past. Pride not arrogance; Confidence not doubt; and not waiver from our principles.
4 posted on 02/25/2006 7:19:32 PM PST by GeorgefromGeorgia
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

Mark for later reading...interesting so far.


5 posted on 02/25/2006 7:22:09 PM PST by el_texicano (Liberals, Socialist, DemocRATS, all touchy, feely, mind numbed robots, useless idiots all)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GOPJ
Western Culture has produced a man on the moon, antibiotics, Mathematics & understanding of the universe itself. Other cultures are so far behind. If the moonbats on the left can't distinguish scientific achievements of the West in he,ping humanity, they are too far gone to be helped.
6 posted on 02/25/2006 7:22:50 PM PST by Freep EE
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

bump


7 posted on 02/25/2006 7:24:05 PM PST by Tribune7
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Freep EE
...they are too far gone to be helped.

I agree, they're too far gone to be helped.

8 posted on 02/25/2006 7:31:17 PM PST by GOPJ (Hollywood has jumped the shark...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

"The Adversary Culture: The perverse anti-Westernism of the cultural elite"

Title is so good, I thought sure the text would disappoint. Instead, it's outstanding, one of the best commentaries I've read in a long, long time.
Who is this fellow and why haven't I noticed him before?


9 posted on 02/25/2006 7:44:16 PM PST by Graymatter (...and what are we going to do about it?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Freep EE
Hey, the Right has its moon-bats, too. Ever notice how many here in this very forum knock capitalism on a frequent basis? Isn't the embracing of capitalism really the defining attribute/social system that made Western-ism what it was and is? I think so...private property rights, the freedom to engage in commerce, and acceptance and reliance on market places to allocate things with value.
10 posted on 02/25/2006 7:49:30 PM PST by LowCountryJoe (The Far Right and the Far Left both disdain markets. If the Left ever finds God, the GOP is toast.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

Good piece.


11 posted on 02/25/2006 7:53:05 PM PST by Texas_Jarhead
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM
We are assaulted by the barbarians from within as much as by our enemies from without. The internal barbarians are the greater threat to the West's survival, for they erode our belief in the greatness of our values, they instill doubt in the justice of our cause and they preach appeasement of, if not submission, to the demands of the external enemy. I am of course speaking of the Western Left. They have become a Fifth Column threatening the future of all we hold near and dear. We must defeat them before we can defeat the enemy abroad.

(Denny Crane: "I Don't Want To Socialize With A Pinko Liberal Democrat Commie. Say What You Like About Republicans. We Stick To Our Convictions. Even When We Know We're Dead Wrong.")

12 posted on 02/25/2006 7:56:40 PM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives On In My Heart Forever)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: el_texicano

"President George Bush Snr adopted the moral equivalence and cultural relativism of the prevailing political class, declaring both the death edict and the novel equally “offensive”. Former president Jimmy Carter responded with a call for Americans to be “sensitive to the concern and anger” of Muslims."

Some things never change, do they. The acorn doesn't fall far from the tree. George Bush Sr declaring the death edict and the novel equally "offensive" back then, George Bush Jr via his State Dept. declaring the cartoons and the response by the Muslim rioting hordes as equally offensive today. Jimmy Carter asking Americans to be "sensitive" to concerns of Muslims back then, Jimmy Carter mouthing off and asking for understanding of Hamas and requesting that the U.S. continue to financially support this new terrorist regime in the Pali territories today.


13 posted on 02/25/2006 8:00:24 PM PST by flaglady47
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

Ping for later reading...


14 posted on 02/25/2006 8:00:50 PM PST by Triggerhippie (Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

From Christiaity came the responsibilty to help widows, to help the orphans, the concept of equal rights, the lead in ending slavery. aid to the poor, proper treatment of children, hospitals. I'm not saying the invention of these concepts, but certainly the widespread usage.


15 posted on 02/25/2006 8:15:17 PM PST by tang-soo (Prophecy of the Seventy Weeks - Read Daniel Chapter 9)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM
The link to the original article doesn't work. Could you provide an update? Thanks. Good article.
16 posted on 02/25/2006 8:55:30 PM PST by stripes1776
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

The only thing that I'll give the French any credit for is the invention of the guillotine back in the 18th century which they then used to behead all the a-holes, incl. the intelligentsia and ruling class. It worked for a while for France but scum does grow back.

Nonetheless, we need our own guillotine solution to rid ourselves of this pestilence which continues to destroy all that we love and stand for.


17 posted on 02/25/2006 9:12:35 PM PST by Rembrandt (We would have won Viet Nam w/o Dim interference.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeorgefromGeorgia
Western Civilization has given much to the World. It is important to remember where we came from and maintain our pride in our past. Pride not arrogance; Confidence not doubt; and not waiver from our principles.

Absolutely true. But "remembering where we came from" and "maintaining pride in our past" is expressly subject to the learning of history. Which is, of course, no longer taught in American schools.

At least, not in a recognizable format.

In sum, even as we speak, we are losing our history.

18 posted on 02/25/2006 9:15:34 PM PST by okie01 (The Mainstream Media: IGNORANCE ON PARADE)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

An excellent article, but it leaves out the main point.....

By the 1960's, Marxists understood that Marxism would never take hold in the Western world, so they had to demonize the West. If Western Europe and America had embraced Marxism, this wouldn't be necessary.

Moral relativism is a reaction to the fact that in terms of practical application, Marxism is a failure. But the true believers keep believing, and in order to believe, they had to create moral relativism, which basically says that the evil White Westerner is too greedy and corrupt to accept Marxism, so therefore, he must be destroyed.

The problem is that if you talk to most people about the threat posed by Marxists they'll say "aw c'mon, Marxism will never prevail". What they don't understand is that it doesn't matter if Marxism never prevails. What matters is that Marxists are working very hard to make Westerners so cynical and blase about our culture and way of life that we won't have the will to defend ourselves against anyone.


19 posted on 02/25/2006 9:17:11 PM PST by The Fop (They attacked 2 of America's main arteries, so we invaded the heart of Arabia. It's that simple)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM
Go read Lawrence Auster's:
PATH TO NATIONAL SUICIDE: An Essay on Immigration &
Multiculturalism .

Multiculturalist studies and teachings have always been about defaming Western Civilization .

That is what the Far-Left and Afro-Centrics might call:
"The Equality of Cultures" - -

'cause according to these neo-Marxists in our universities,
everything is subject, i.e. the greatness of Western Civ' is just a point of view !
20 posted on 02/25/2006 9:28:50 PM PST by marc costanzo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

bookmark


21 posted on 02/25/2006 10:00:00 PM PST by sageb1 (This is the Final Crusade. There are only 2 sides. Pick one.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

Excellent column! I see our old friend Ward Churchill gets prominent mention, as well he should.

The Left has built all of this anti-Western sentiment on lies, and very few call them on it.

We need to circulate this column widely.


22 posted on 02/25/2006 10:10:09 PM PST by Rocky (Air America: Robbing the poor to feed the Left)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Freep EE
Western Culture has produced a man on the moon, antibiotics, Mathematics & understanding of the universe itself.

That gives me a GREAT idea! Instead of spending all this U.S. taxpayer money to fight AIDS in Africa, why dont we import some of their medical technology to help us with our AIDS problem here in America.

23 posted on 02/25/2006 10:16:02 PM PST by LK44-40
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: GOPJ

Well said.


24 posted on 02/25/2006 10:28:48 PM PST by RobbyS ( CHIRHO)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM
An excellent post, and thanks for bringing it to us. What most appalls me about the current state of Western intellectual life is that Edward Said, Ward Churchill, Noam Chomsky, Susan Sontag and Naomi Klein are in the least taken seriously. Of these only Chomsky ever pretended to be a serious scholar and that (1) was in an unrelated field, and (2) was long before he became the poster boy for reflexive anti-Americanism.

Their real god, Marxism, has settled in among the other relics in the cultural dumpster and is good for humor value only at this point.

25 posted on 02/25/2006 10:55:54 PM PST by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

"You say that it is your custom to burn widows. Very well. We also have a custom: when men burn a woman alive, we tie a rope around their necks and we hang them. Build your funeral pyre; beside it, my carpenters will build a gallows. You may follow your custom. And then we will follow ours."

I loved this!!

That's the problem with these self-hating, suicidal, guilt-ridden apologists of those who would kill them. They can find nothing good about the culture that is providing them a life of liberty, security and comfort, yet they can't find anything bad about cultures which if they ever became dominant would waste no time in eliminating them.

We do have a weakness in our culture - we allow ungrateful parasites like these in places of prestige and influence. It's time we put a stop to this!!


26 posted on 02/25/2006 11:26:41 PM PST by aquila48
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM
The first time I personally noticed this redefining of our culture was in 1962 or 1963. The socialist asshole teacher was Mr. Brian in a joint high school class social studies lecture.

It was there that I witnessed the first outright lies. Mr. Brian's favorite tactic was quoting Marxists writers and calling them "respected Conservative authors". May that lying pig rot in hell. God only knows how many of my 60s generation he polluted.

Nam Vet

27 posted on 02/25/2006 11:28:12 PM PST by Nam Vet (The Democrat Party of America is perfectly P.C. * .(* P.C. = Patriotically Challenged)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

"Cultural relativism claims there are no absolute standards for assessing human culture. Hence all cultures should be regarded as equal, though different."

Couldn't disagree more... There is a very simple, objective and reality-based standard for judging whether one culture is superior to another. Anytime two cultures come in contact with each other, the one that ends up dominating the other is the superior one. (By the way a culture dominating another does not mean a people dominating another).

The biggest threat to our culture is not other cultures, rather it is our own home grown parasites which we tolerate far too much. Hopefully our cultural antibodies will react soon and strong enough to neutralize these pathogens.


28 posted on 02/25/2006 11:50:26 PM PST by aquila48
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: aquila48; All
"Cultural relativism claims there are no absolute standards for assessing human culture. Hence all cultures should be regarded as equal, though different."

Here is simple experimental proof that liberals are knowingly lying through their teeth when they say this.

1. Steer a conversation with a liberal to the point he/she/it (hey, some of them are in the middle of sex changes so their gender is indeterminate, right?) spouts this nonsense.

2. Ask them once again to affirm that all cultures are equal.

3. When they say "Yes" then ask them why they don't move to a Red State (or even better, the Bible Belt).

4. Watch the smoke come out of their ears!

QED.

Cheers!

29 posted on 02/26/2006 12:16:34 AM PST by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM

Very interesting so far. Will read the rest later.


30 posted on 02/26/2006 1:03:27 AM PST by Actually_in_Tokyo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM
To excuse such an atrocity by blaming US government policies is to deny the basic idea of all morality: that individuals are responsible for their actions.

A tenet of the Democrat party.

31 posted on 02/26/2006 4:57:31 AM PST by Jacquerie (Democrats soil institutions)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: The Fop
But the true believers keep believing, and in order to believe, they had to create moral relativism, which basically says that the evil White Westerner is too greedy and corrupt to accept Marxism, so therefore, he must be destroyed.

And the true believers joined in an alliance with those who share their goals, the islamofascists.

32 posted on 02/26/2006 5:03:52 AM PST by Jacquerie (Democrats soil institutions)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: GeorgefromGeorgia

Has the intellectual center of the world shifted to Australia? Every time it's real "out of the box" thinking, it's from Australia. Odd.


33 posted on 02/26/2006 5:05:27 AM PST by GOPJ (Hollywood has jumped the shark...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: RobbyS

Thanks :)


34 posted on 02/26/2006 5:09:35 AM PST by GOPJ (Hollywood has jumped the shark...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: GOPJ
I have no basis to confirm your suspicions. It is good to read that there are other countries where people are questioning multiculturalism. I think our problems with the Muslim world may cause more people to question multiculturalism. It is fairly obvious that the Muslim world is centuries behind the development of the West. The East, Japan, Korea, Taiwan took the good from Western Civ and melded it with their own, with notable results. China is in the process of doing the same after entering that cul-de-sac of communism.
35 posted on 02/26/2006 6:47:24 AM PST by GeorgefromGeorgia
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: neverdem; Tolik; mhking; rdb3; NicknamedBob; dyed_in_the_wool; Army Air Corps; Travis McGee; ...

long as hell, well worth the read


36 posted on 02/26/2006 7:45:50 AM PST by King Prout (many accuse me of being overly literal... this would not be a problem if many were not under-precise)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM
couldn't begin to read it all...

was recently at a talk by a man who co-authored a book with then-Cardinal Ratzinger who mentioned the Pope's concern not only with Europe's secularism but also with the west's "self-loathing" as destabilizing forces in an age of globalization. It's just plain unhealthy.

37 posted on 02/26/2006 9:00:54 AM PST by the invisib1e hand ("Who is it, really, making up your mind?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GOPJ
Has the intellectual center of the world shifted to Australia? Every time it's real "out of the box" thinking, it's from Australia. Odd.

It's encouraging that it's somewhere.

However, there is still the plight of the Gay Aborigine to consider...

38 posted on 02/26/2006 9:03:51 AM PST by the invisib1e hand ("Who is it, really, making up your mind?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: LK44-40
why dont we import some of their medical technology to help us with our AIDS problem here in America.

loved this.

39 posted on 02/26/2006 9:07:58 AM PST by the invisib1e hand ("Who is it, really, making up your mind?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: TFFKAMM
"The way to oppose it, however, is less clear."

Abolish tenure and fire all the commie radicals. Let them drive cabs for a living. Rigorously discriminate against anyone expressing commie opinions in every sphere of life. Fire them, ban them, insult them, mock them, shun them, spit at them, and if they start anything over it, shoot them in self defense. Raw political power and utter contempt openly expressed. Systematic purges. It is all perfectly doable. It is not done because people keep trying to pretend it isn't a problem, when it is way, way beyond a problem by now.

40 posted on 02/26/2006 2:20:14 PM PST by JasonC
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cacique

btt


41 posted on 02/27/2006 1:20:32 AM PST by Cacique (quos Deus vult perdere, prius dementat ( Islamia Delenda Est ))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: the invisib1e hand
It's encouraging that it's somewhere.

Good one...

42 posted on 02/27/2006 8:32:44 AM PST by GOPJ (If an anti-American sheik takes over Dubai after the port deal... What then?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Billthedrill
"Their real god, Marxism, has settled in among the other relics in the cultural dumpster and is good for humor value only at this point."

The real god, IMHO, is Romanticism. Take that away and you take away the the avant garde, progressive post modern ethos, the problem with the bourgeois, the hedonism, the search for identity, the ineluctable nose dive into the id as a cure for repression within society. Rousseau suggested something was lost by entering society from the state of nature. Everything romanticized and idealized that followed was an attempt to correct that problem (including a free sex, worker's paradise).
43 posted on 02/27/2006 11:36:05 PM PST by Blind Eye Jones
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Blind Eye Jones
I agree completely. Marxism (and other related systems of thought such as Nazism) are profoundly romantic, which explains their continuing appeal in the face of complete and utter failure to deliver the promised goods. Only that could possibly explain the weird fashion for Che Guevara - the t-shirts, the ridiculous Motorcycle Diaries - on the part of those who simply don't want to hear that he was a failure as a revolutionary and a psychopathic monster because it's uncongenial to their fantasy worlds.

Romanticism per se isn't the problem so much as people who are drunk with it. Enjoying an overbearing aristocrat get his comeuppance is one thing, watching all of them being marched to the guillotine and cheering the death of the innocent is quite another. That is equally true of the bourgeoisie or the Jews or whatever the "oppressor" class of the moment happens to be.

I would add collectivism to the mix because only when one is subject to the dehumanization inherent in dealing with another person as a member of a class rather than an individual human being do we get the sort of outrageous violations of human decency we see in fascism, Nazism, communism, Jacobinism, radical Islam, and to only a slightly lesser degree in such class enthusiasms as feminism and racial movements from Mugabe's to Sharpton's.

44 posted on 02/28/2006 10:07:12 AM PST by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: Billthedrill
"I would add collectivism to the mix because only when one is subject to the dehumanization inherent in dealing with another person as a member of a class rather than an individual human being do we get the sort of outrageous violations of human decency we see in fascism, Nazism, communism, Jacobinism, radical Islam, and to only a slightly lesser degree in such class enthusiasms as feminism and racial movements from Mugabe's to Sharpton's"

I agree. It's when people are looked upon as snowflakes in an avalanche, as instances of general forces, and not yet fully human -- endowed with consciousness, character, feelings, moral strengths and weaknesses -- that they are prone to abuse.
45 posted on 02/28/2006 9:49:55 PM PST by Blind Eye Jones
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson