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Hollywood Hero: Colombia scolds Bruce Willis for suggesting U.S. invasion to end cocaine trade
Mainichi Daily News ^ | March 12, 2006

Posted on 03/12/2006 8:51:58 AM PST by llevrok

BOGOTA, Colombia -- Colombia has it in for Hollywood's ultimate tough guy.

Andres Pastrana, the country's ambassador in Washington, scolded actor Bruce Willis on Friday for suggesting that the United States should consider invading Colombia as part of its war on drugs.

At a media event in New York to promote his new film, "16 Blocks," Willis said the United States should weigh "going to Colombia and doing whatever it takes to end the cocaine trade."

Willis' comments, on screen and off, have landed him in trouble before. But this time his remarks have irked normally stone-faced diplomats.

In a harshly worded letter made public, Pastrana told the outspoken actor that the source of the lucrative cocaine trade was an "enormous appetite for drugs, in particular in the United States and Europe."

Willis' publicist in Los Angeles declined to comment.

Pastrana, who as president in 2000 launched an anti-drug effort with billions of dollars in aid from the United States, added that no country has sacrificed more than his own to rein in drug trafficking. Thousands of innocent civilians are killed each year as a result of anti-drugs efforts, he said.

Pastrana invited Willis to visit Colombia, saying "if you accept, you will see that, beyond Hollywood cliches, 44 million Colombians are waging a real war against drugs."

The United States has spent US$4 billion over the past five years under the so-called Plan Colombia to fumigate drug crops and train local forces battling leftist rebels and far-right paramilitary groups that control much of the drug trade.

Although the effort has led to record cocaine seizures and the extradition of dozens of druglords to the United States, Colombia remains the world's largest supplier of cocaine.

Pastrana's diplomatic rebuke was likely to be well received by Colombians, who on television and in letters to newspapers have called the "Die Hard" actor's remarks disparaging and insensitive.

President Alvaro Uribe, whose hot temper is famous in Colombia, last week called the actor arrogant and ignorant and said his comments were "a shock to Colombia's dignity."

Willis, who's gone from a working-class New Jersey upbringing to paychecks of up to US$20 million, was married to actress Demi Moore. He has appeared in "12 Monkeys," "Nobody's Fool," "Pulp Fiction," and "The Sixth Sense," among other films. (AP)


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS: 16blocks; brucewillis; colombia; drugs; drugtrafficking; hollywood
Thank Gosh for Bruce !!!
1 posted on 03/12/2006 8:52:01 AM PST by llevrok
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To: llevrok

Problem is, where there's demand, there will be supply.


2 posted on 03/12/2006 8:54:48 AM PST by Sam Cree (absolute reality) - ("Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one." Albert Einstein)
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To: llevrok

Bruce, I love the sentiment but that wouldn't stop the cocaine trade. I say give every addict (to hard drugs) in the country, their weight in their favorite HARD drug. One time deal. For the next few days, your just pickin' up bodies.


3 posted on 03/12/2006 8:55:14 AM PST by trubluolyguy (Islam, Religion of Peace and they'll kill you to prove it.)
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To: llevrok

"Colombia has it in for Hollywood's ultimate tough guy"

For a minute there, I thought they meant Columbia Pictures...LOL. But if it's just the country Columbia I'm thinking; so?


4 posted on 03/12/2006 8:58:57 AM PST by SAMS (Nobody loves a soldier until the enemy is at the gate; Army Wife & Marine Mom)
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To: llevrok
Moronic Hollywood liberal strikes again.
5 posted on 03/12/2006 9:01:54 AM PST by tallhappy (Juntos Podemos!)
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To: llevrok

In the early 90s, I spent some time in Colombia. While there, some of my hosts raised the issue of drugs and cocaine and the insatiable desire for it by my fellow citizens. I argued that if they didn't produce it, then there would not be the demand. I see the Colombian ambassador has continued to argue that it is, as usual, "our" fault. So, which is it, our demand or their supply which is the problem?


6 posted on 03/12/2006 9:04:05 AM PST by miele man
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To: tallhappy

Willis is not a "moronic liberal". He is a very conservative Republican.


7 posted on 03/12/2006 9:04:51 AM PST by miele man
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To: llevrok

Bruce is one of the few Hollywood icons with a brain. I suspect it may be due to the fact that he wasn't born with the silver spoon in his mouth that most stars today were born into. It also explains why so many in Hollywood make big money with relatively little acting ability - if your father is a producer or your Aunt paves the way for you, (as in George Clooney) no-talents with limited intellectual capacity can end up on top. It is small wonder that box office receipts are sinking faster each year.


8 posted on 03/12/2006 9:05:24 AM PST by onevoter
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To: llevrok
Willis said the United States should weigh "going to Colombia and doing whatever it takes to end the cocaine trade."

What? And end the supply to Hollywood? Perish the thought!

9 posted on 03/12/2006 9:06:58 AM PST by CommandoFrank (Peer into the depths of hell and there you will find the face of Islam...)
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To: miele man
He is a very conservative Republican.

A very conservative Republican whoe supported Grey Davis against re-call?

Why you ever have these fantasies is beyond me.

10 posted on 03/12/2006 9:07:24 AM PST by tallhappy (Juntos Podemos!)
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To: llevrok

Invade? Columbia is an ally, and the word does not sound appropriate. "Liberate" (from drug lords) and "secure" sounds better.


11 posted on 03/12/2006 9:09:04 AM PST by Wiz
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To: llevrok

For the life of me, I cannot understand how the opinion of ANY Hollywood actor has any relevance or is newsworthy in any way.

What side an actor is on is completely irrelevant. To make their individual statements into a news story just seems utterly ridiculous to me.


12 posted on 03/12/2006 9:10:33 AM PST by MineralMan (godless atheist)
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To: tallhappy

He's more libertarian.


13 posted on 03/12/2006 9:11:20 AM PST by MarkeyD (Make Love, Not Cartoons. I really, really loathe liberals.)
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To: MarkeyD

http://movies.msn.com/movies/hitlist/2-24-06?GT1=100

Willis has identified himself as a Republican in the past, and before a journalist could even ask for his opinion on recent current events, the star interrupted him to set something straight.

"I'm sick of answering this [expletive] question," he says. "I'm a Republican only as far as I want a smaller government, I want less government intrusion. I want them to stop [expletive] on my money and your money and tax dollars that we give 50 percent of... every year. I want them to be fiscally responsible and I want these [expletive] lobbyists out of Washington. Do that and I'll say I'm a Republican... I hate the government, OK? I'm a-political. Write that down. I'm not a Republican."


14 posted on 03/12/2006 9:14:55 AM PST by IRememberElian
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To: MarkeyD
He's more libertarian.

Libertarian? A libertarian supporting the WO(S)D? They must be skatin' in hell....


15 posted on 03/12/2006 9:21:36 AM PST by BullDog108 ("Conservatives believe in God. Liberals think they are God." ---Ann Coulter)
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To: miele man

Our laws making possession a crime is the problem. Legitimize it and let 'em have the stuff. If users want to poison themselves then so be it. In my view, it should be treated as a medical problem as opposed to a legal problem.


16 posted on 03/12/2006 9:24:30 AM PST by GW and Twins Pawpaw (Sheepdog for Five [My grandkids are way more important than any lefty's feelings!])
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To: llevrok

Bruce ought to know that Hollywood is Colombia's biggest client


17 posted on 03/12/2006 9:25:33 AM PST by mfnorman
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To: BullDog108

Just another celeb who pops off about stuff he doesn't know about and everyone listens.

We have to do that here.


18 posted on 03/12/2006 9:26:03 AM PST by IRememberElian
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To: llevrok
Colombians, who on television and in letters to newspapers have called the "Die Hard" actor's remarks disparaging and insensitive.

They left out the ever-popular "racist".

19 posted on 03/12/2006 9:29:39 AM PST by BunnySlippers
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To: miele man

you never passed economics 101 did you? demand drives supply, not the other way around.


20 posted on 03/12/2006 9:30:19 AM PST by Republican Party Reptile
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To: miele man
I argued that if they didn't produce it, then there would not be the demand.

ROFL!
.
21 posted on 03/12/2006 9:31:13 AM PST by mugs99 (Don't take life too seriously, you won't get out alive.)
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To: IRememberElian

Thanks for posting that. First time I've seen or read his comments.


22 posted on 03/12/2006 9:31:23 AM PST by miele man
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To: IRememberElian

Sounds good to me, people need to quit identifying themselves by party, and arrange their priorities to supporting those that would vote to make this country better, not fill their pockets. We need to grab the control of this govt back from the govt, and return to constitutional limits. Given the numbers of citizens, this should be a simple task. Of course given the same numbers of illiterate people, and those that are corrupt at heart, impossible.


23 posted on 03/12/2006 9:31:48 AM PST by jeremiah (Anyone got a tagline for rent?)
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To: llevrok

Pretty silly when any movie person can get under a countries skin so much.


24 posted on 03/12/2006 9:32:00 AM PST by Joe Boucher (an enemy of islam)
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To: SAMS

My first thought was Columbia as in movie company, too. It would sound logical that a bigwig in H'wood would object to an actor suggesting that the cocaine supply be stopped!


25 posted on 03/12/2006 9:32:50 AM PST by Moonmad27
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To: Wiz

Drugs are coming in right thru our open porous borders so what country should we really invade?


26 posted on 03/12/2006 9:34:52 AM PST by stopem
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To: Sam Cree
Problem is, where there is a demand, there will be a supply.
______________

I was downtown Panama back in 1985 and saw guys selling drugs in the street and pointed out to a Panamanian lady who was a friend of my wife.

She says well they are just bringing the drugs through Panama to the States. It is America´s fault that there is a drug trade it dosen´t have anything to do with Panama. I told her that those drug dealers were leaving behind enough drugs for her neighbors and the children and local markets. If she thought this was just an American problem to wait awhile and she would see it become a Panamanian problem too.

Here it is 2006, The cops, businessmen, lawyers and law makers in Panama are even more corrupt. Where their used to be one murder a day in the newspapers now there are three to five. Panama has some vicious street gangs and they have no problem killing anyone. In fact, they are encouraged to do so. A lot of the victims of murder are taxi drivers, because they usually have some cash on them after driving a cab all day. I know some of them and they are scared because they never know that when they go to work in the morning if they are coming home to their families at night. Crime and drugs go together.

I am almost getting to the point of saying lets legalize drugs give these junkies all the drugs they want and let them kill themselves.
27 posted on 03/12/2006 9:37:21 AM PST by Americanexpat (A strong democracy through citizen oversight.)
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To: Republican Party Reptile

Say's Law says (get it? "Say" "says"?) otherwise...


28 posted on 03/12/2006 9:39:27 AM PST by durasell (!)
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To: jeremiah
Sounds good to me, people need to quit identifying themselves by party,

Yeah, I quit allowing myself to be called "Republican" about 20 years ago. Of course, then people call me "liberal" and things get ugly.

29 posted on 03/12/2006 9:41:04 AM PST by IRememberElian
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To: MineralMan
For the life of me, I cannot understand how the opinion of ANY Hollywood actor has any relevance or is newsworthy in any way.

What side an actor is on is completely irrelevant. To make their individual statements into a news story just seems utterly ridiculous to me.

Well said. Bears repeating.

30 posted on 03/12/2006 9:43:10 AM PST by Sarastro
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To: trubluolyguy

As immoral as it may seem, not a bad idea. Given something like 75-80% of most crime is related to drug use/trafficking, so why not give it a whirl? I would make sure the media picks up on all the dead dopers being sent to the morgue (we'd need to rent out a few football fields all over the country, primarily the big cities) and then make sure our young people see what happens when you play with fire. Unfortunately, there is so much corruption involved with dope money on both sides of the border I don't think it will ever end. As long as people have a weakness of some kind, hang around the wrong people and can figure out a way to pay for the habit once they're hooked, it will go on. Which brings about the other option of legalizing it and controlling it via the government. Although that's morally reprehensible as well, we do it now with alcohol and tobacco being taxed (heavily) and somewhat controlled by government, so.....


31 posted on 03/12/2006 9:46:36 AM PST by john drake (roman military maxim: "oderint dum metuant, i.e., let them hate, as long as they fear")
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To: Sam Cree

No, it is where there is not harsh enough punishment for those supplying that the drug trade florishes. I think one of the reasons many politicians aren't eager to address the Illegal immigration problem is because they know that it will adversely effect the drug trade from which they benefit. Some of their biggest campaign donors are probably involved and are profiting from the trade more so than anyone is profiting from the use of illegal labor which is a myth used to justify lax border enforcement. Most of the benefits from illegal alien labor are not passed down to consumers and more than 2 thirds of money earned ends up flowing to Mexico while most illegals here take advantage of our welfare system and health resources. I think that the cocain trade could be stopped best by creating a custom biological organism that will either target the plants or target the substance in users bodies causing an adverse allergic reaction or an immunity to the effects of the drug. We have the tools to do such things and some of the research has been completed already. We have choices we can spend scientific resources to create a novel way that would permanently disable the drug trade or we can use force.


32 posted on 03/12/2006 9:55:55 AM PST by Ma3lst0rm (It is not because we can't win the war on drugs but because we don't have the will.)
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To: Sam Cree
"Problem is, where there's demand, there will be supply."

So. You're not a supply-side economist, then?

33 posted on 03/12/2006 10:46:35 AM PST by CowboyJay (Rough Riders! Tancredo '08)
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To: CowboyJay
"So. You're not a supply-side economist, then?"

I plead ignorance on economic matters, though I did just take delivery of Dr. Sowell's book on the subject in an attempt to educate myself.

But I think my previous comment may not be at variance with supply side philosophy, since it addresses a real demand, rather than one which is centrally manipulated by authority.

34 posted on 03/13/2006 5:59:40 AM PST by Sam Cree (absolute reality) - ("Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one." Albert Einstein)
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To: miele man

I've always been of the opinion if we didn't want the stuff, the Columbians wouldn't manufacture it. Don't really know what to about drugs. The WoD is entirely to dangerous to personal freedom, and drugs are entirely too dangerous to leave it alone.


35 posted on 03/13/2006 6:03:50 AM PST by Little Ray (I'm a reactionary, hirsute, gun-owning, knuckle dragging, Christian Neanderthal and proud of it!)
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To: Sam Cree
"But I think my previous comment may not be at variance with supply side philosophy, since it addresses a real demand, rather than one which is centrally manipulated by authority."

I was just attempting a little humor. I didn't believe you'd actually take me up on the point. I should known better than to try that with a FReeper! LOL

36 posted on 03/13/2006 6:11:38 AM PST by CowboyJay (Rough Riders! Tancredo '08)
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To: Sam Cree

And where billions of tax dollars are spent to block the supply-bilions wil be made by criminal cartels who defy the blockade and provide the supply. Most of those consuming the available supplies will be unable to afford the drugs and will become criminals themselves in order to buy the supplies.

The war on drugs is more evil and destructive than the drugs themselves could ever be.

Flame away folks.


37 posted on 03/13/2006 6:15:49 AM PST by F.J. Mitchell (Muslims give us a choice-their way or the dieway.)
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To: SAMS

That's what I thought too. I thought maybe they didn't want their great lead actors getting fat if they stopped their habit...


38 posted on 03/13/2006 6:16:20 AM PST by WV Mountain Mama (I don't need to visualize whirled peas. I'm a mom, I've SEEN them.)
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To: llevrok

Bruce Willis, one of my favorite actors. He is a true American.


39 posted on 03/13/2006 6:18:44 AM PST by Dustbunny (Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there. - Will Rogers)
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To: CowboyJay

Whoops, sorry. If I knew more about economics, I'd probably have seen where you were coming from :-)


40 posted on 03/13/2006 6:29:36 AM PST by Sam Cree (absolute reality) - ("Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one." Albert Einstein)
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To: Ma3lst0rm
"...it is where there is not harsh enough punishment for those supplying that the drug trade florishes."

I don't know, the punishments are pretty severe already, but the money to be made is truly very great, there are people who are ready to take the risk. Sometimes it's a surprise to find out just whom they are. Increasing the severity of punishment would probably discourage some folks from trading in drugs, depending on the new laws, but OTOH, anything that cuts into the supply will also increase the money to be made, which ought to tempt someone enough to get into the druggie business.

I don't know that I accept your position that alien smuggling is a major player in weakening the enforcement side of the drug war, though it does make sense that it's related.

As for the idea of creating a biological agent that would attack the plant or the user, that is a double edged sword in the extreme. Think of the horror of such a thing, if ever introduced into the nation's or world's crops. I for one would be horrified at the idea of introducing such a thing into the world. Another argument against the War on Drugs, if anything.

41 posted on 03/13/2006 6:52:14 AM PST by Sam Cree (absolute reality) - ("Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one." Albert Einstein)
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To: F.J. Mitchell

Your post #37 is a pretty good capsule history of the War on Drugs.


42 posted on 03/13/2006 6:53:30 AM PST by Sam Cree (absolute reality) - ("Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one." Albert Einstein)
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To: Sam Cree
Thank you Sam, and similarly we can capsulaize the rabid support for the defenders of abortion,right down to what the banning thereof would mean to the heavy investors therein.
43 posted on 03/13/2006 12:44:00 PM PST by F.J. Mitchell (Muslims give us a choice-their way or the dieway.)
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To: Sam Cree

What I mean is you kill the suppliers and destory their fields, and their property. War should mean war. What we have it is seems is a war in name only where only primarily lowly street dealers and users get caught.
What I meant in referencing the "connection" between illegal alien traffic and drug trafficing is that porous borders benefits drug trafficers and those they provide political funding to more than it does the illegals or those that hire them. I also believe that a secure border could cut off most of the drug trade coming from outside this country as well as protect us from other minor things like Alqaeda. My only conclusion is that people in political office in spite of popular support for it really don't want a secure border and I have a hard time believing it is because of the plight of poor mexicans.
The two reasons that come to mind are the drug trade and day labor needs and I have a hard time believing it is because they can't find enough lettuce pickers so that leaves the drug trade as the likely candidate. It is only by following the money can we find out why the illegal immigrant situation has been allowed to trump national security.

The National Research Council published a report showing that illegal immigrants have a net benefit of 10 billion dollars a year to the economy. Though I doubt this study it illustrates that illegal immigration is not something that is of great benefit to our 10-trillion dollar economy though some employers do rely on illegals because it is easy to get someone who has nothing to do anything but they could just as easily find legal workers in poor and depressed areas throughout the US. So why all the hand wringing when it comes to securing the border? Is it really the need for slave labor and if it is then what does that say about us?
I believe it is the estimated 50 billion dollar US drug trade that politicians really care about and that the illegal aliens are a convenient way to sidestep the issue.

Is there a conspiracy? No, it is just an industry with lots of easy money and convenient circumstances that allow those in power who benefit the most to cloud the issue. It is not unlike other industries who try to maximize profits and protect their interests through lobbyists.

As for the use of science to end this problem permanently I think it is a good option. The simplest way would be to develop vaccines that could be administered from childhood on up as an option so that children would never be at risk from heroin or cocain even if they did try it they would be immune to the effects. It could be administered to prisoners and any convicted of a drug related offense and would eventually eliminate the demand altogether. That aside I believe the biggest problem is the lack of enforcement and the poverty in Mexico which fuels the drug trade. We do not have a problem with Drugs from Canada because of this. If it were only a supply and demand issue then we'd expect Canadians eager to get in on the trade too but ironically we have a bigger legal drug "problem" with Candada than illegal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drug_trafficking
http://www.newstarget.com/001513.html
http://www.cato.org/dailys/03-20-02.html
http://www.serendipity.li/wod/euro_pr.html
http://www.voanews.com/english/archive/2005-05/2005-05-02-voa53.cfm


44 posted on 03/13/2006 1:08:08 PM PST by Ma3lst0rm (It is not because we can't win the war on drugs but because we don't have the will.)
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