Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

RFID: Europe Wants to Tag You
Brussels Journal ^ | 2006-03-12 | Elaib Harvey

Posted on 03/20/2006 9:36:15 AM PST by robowombat

RFID: Europe Wants to Tag You

From the desk of Elaib Harvey on Sun, 2006-03-12 20:45

Am I the only one who is a tad concerned about the new RFID (Radio Frequency Identification Devices) Policy for Europe? I hope not. This year data retention legislation was introduced by the European Parliament and now we have the execrable Viviane Reding at a major conference in Hanover burbling about the Commission’s new consultation on the electronic tagging technology.

Given that Commission Press Releases are normally bland to the point of ennui the following is quite something, “But their power to report their location, identity and history also raises serious concerns about personal privacy and security.” You could say that.

Some years ago I learned that the Commission was developing an RFID chip with Toshiba and a couple of German funds that could fit into a €50 note. When I spoke to the companies’ press officers they got very huffy about it but would not deny the project. The Commission refused to talk.

The kit itself really is pretty clever. At one recent Tesco trial the tags embedded in the packaging of Gillette M3 razors activated cameras that photographed the customer at the shelf and again at the checkout. An admirable tool to combat shoplifting no doubt, but in truth I do not trust governments. This technology, may be undoubtedly clever and effective – logistics, just in time ordering and all sorts of other applications spring to mind – until the government gets involved. Last week’s announcement that the new UK driving licence is to be biometric is an example.

Now with EU wide RFID “ambient networks” or “internet of things,” where almost everything you buy or own or use is talking to each other, I am a little concerned. The Commissions phrase “But RFID devices will also pervade the Government sector (e.g. eGovernment, national defence and security)” should set one thinking. I don’t like the way that appears to be going.

What was particularly interesting about Mrs Reding’s comments was the pretence (as usual – q.v. enlargement, constitution, etc) that this consultation would be about producing a “bottom-up consensus on RFID” in the EU. The problem is that if the general public have fears about the technology, and its privacy and democratic risks, then the Commission would “answer the unreasonable fears.” That is they have already decided what they want and this consultation is, as usual, a farce. The fact that she announced the consultation at the same time as she told us that “the EU and US had reached an agreement to collaborate over interoperability and privacy in October” does rather prove that the decisions have been made.

In the interests of my own peace of mind I have signed up for two of the Commission’s RFID workshops: · RFID Application domains and emerging trends: RFID offers promising application potential in many domains – pharmaceuticals, health, agriculture, transport, logistics, security and more. This workshop should identify these application domains, prioritise them and formulate recommendations: e.g. what can be done to assess the needs, and to define guidelines on the use of technology in these domains? · End-user/consumer issues: Work will include re-assessing the need to revise the e-privacy directive in relation to RFID; the ethical implications of RFID; the acceptability of technological approaches to build trust – with a special focus on privacy and authentication (tag to reader, reader to tag, reader to network); and to enhance security (there is no privacy without layered security).

Interestingly these workshops were announced last Thursday. The first took place Monday and Tuesday. Which is a shame because I missed this fascinating dissertation, “Dr. Françoise Roure, Conseil général des technologies de l’information: From digital object identification to digital identification of people.”


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Constitution/Conservatism; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events; Philosophy; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: 4a; 4thamendment; bigbrother; camera; cameras; europe; fourthamendment; monitor; monitoring; monitors; nationalid; privacy; rfid; surveillance; watching

1 posted on 03/20/2006 9:36:17 AM PST by robowombat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: robowombat

Controlling people...is what the new world odor is all about.


2 posted on 03/20/2006 9:48:35 AM PST by joesnuffy (A camel once bit our sister..but we knew just what to do...we gathered rocks and squashed her!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: joesnuffy
Now, now... Our dear leftist friends would never electronically brand people like cattle so they could effectively monitor them and, if need be, exterminate them.

Oh, no. They would never, ever do such a thing. And the fact that they have nothing at all to say about Stalin or Mao? Don't bother yourself about that. The leftist swine are always fat moralists.

3 posted on 03/20/2006 9:53:38 AM PST by Reactionary (The Moonbats Need an Enema)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Reactionary

Just remember it goes in steps: it's the "undesirables" who will be the first ones tagged.


4 posted on 03/20/2006 9:58:55 AM PST by sionnsar (†trad-anglican.faithweb.com† | Libs: Celebrate MY diversity! | Iran Azadi 2006)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: robowombat

PARANOID ALERT!

"Controlling people...is what the new world odor is all about."

Au contraire: controlling people who "have something to hide" is what it's all about...criminals.

The old adage: "the guilty dog barks first" applies here.

Of course paranod schizophrenics and manic depressives won't like this new "wrinkle on crime control" either, in as much as, they see spies hiding in breakfast cereal.

Law abiding citizens will welcome these measures which ultimately reduce crime and the costs that are usually passed on to them through higher prices which account for the "shrinkage" due from criminals and crime.

Technology marches on. And so do you Mr. Theif. Right on to prison for your dishonesty.


5 posted on 03/20/2006 10:15:31 AM PST by CBart95
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CBart95

JACKASS ALERT!

"Au contraire: controlling people who "have something to hide" is what it's all about...criminals"


My position is that you may not be a criminal today but you will surely be one tomorrow as soon as we detect you doing something that we don't like. And, we have this handy technology to track you with when you do it.

"see spies hiding in breakfast cereal."

We see news articles describing new technology that offers wonderful opportunities to turn us all into something similiar to an individual in a beehive: Monitored 24/7 on the street and in the home.


6 posted on 03/20/2006 10:23:39 AM PST by Belasarius (Yet man is born unto trouble, as the sparks fly upward. Job 5:2-7)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
Of course paranod schizophrenics and manic depressives won't like this new "wrinkle on crime control"

Neither will people that love freedom and privacy.

7 posted on 03/20/2006 10:33:07 AM PST by Centurion2000 (Islam's true face: http://makeashorterlink.com/?J169127BC)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: robowombat
if the trend follows the UK will be the first to find all kinds of onerous ways to start using this data in civil and criminal enforcement issues. secure beneath the watchful eyes and the trackable tags indeed.


8 posted on 03/20/2006 10:46:41 AM PST by WoofDog123
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Belasarius

You are quite right. Be prepared for the evolution of the Borg party and their schemes for this technology.


9 posted on 03/20/2006 10:48:09 AM PST by doc30 (Democrats are to morals what and Etch-A-Sketch is to Art.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: CBart95

actually compiling data on private citizens movements and activities which will never be destroyed and can be trotted out or used covertly at ANY TIME IN THE REST OF THAT PERSON'S LIFE should raise eyebrows. Just the mere awareness that such data exists and is being compiled will affect how some people engage in lawful activities they would rather keep private - yes, even law-abiding citizens sometimes desire privacy, including from the loving arms of the State.

There is a group that takes the attitude that privacy isn't important and it is ok for fedgov to know everywhere you went, everything you did, bought, etc., for the last 20 years, but they are a minority.


10 posted on 03/20/2006 10:50:24 AM PST by WoofDog123
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
"Law abiding citizens will welcome these measures which ultimately reduce crime and the costs that are usually passed on to them through higher prices which account for the "shrinkage" due from criminals and crime."

You make law abiding cattle sound almost appealing.

11 posted on 03/20/2006 2:34:22 PM PST by Reactionary (The Moonbats Need an Enema)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Reactionary

Yeah?

They are still referred to as citizens in this United States.

...with all the rights ,privileges and freedoms thereto pertaining. They obey the law, pursue life ,liberty happiness and self actualization and lives without fear.

It's so great a way of living that they frequently, lay their own lives on the line to voluntarily defend it.

These wonderful people make great neighbors and absolutely fearsome enemies.

They are occasionally slow to make big decisions but easily recognize that the cost of freedom is eternal vigilence.


12 posted on 03/20/2006 2:58:27 PM PST by CBart95
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Reactionary
Now, now... Our dear leftist friends would never electronically brand people like cattle so they could effectively monitor them and, if need be,

It is the corporatist fascists that will enable them.
13 posted on 03/20/2006 3:50:25 PM PST by hedgetrimmer ("I'm a millionaire thanks to the WTO and "free trade" system--Hu Jintao top 10 worst dictators)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
Law abiding citizens will welcome these measures ...

Speak for yourself.

You must be one of those sheep who believe in the adage "If you're not guilty, then you should have nothing to hide."

Those are the words of tyrants.

I will live my life by Franklin's words : "Those who give up essential liberties for security deserve neither".

14 posted on 03/23/2006 2:56:53 AM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: robowombat

bookmark


15 posted on 03/23/2006 2:58:35 AM PST by GiovannaNicoletta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: robowombat
"At one recent Tesco trial the tags embedded in the packaging of Gillette M3 razors activated cameras that photographed the customer at the shelf and again at the checkout."

www.boycottgillette.com

16 posted on 03/23/2006 3:10:10 AM PST by endthematrix (None dare call it ISLAMOFACISM!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: robowombat

What we really need is for every gun every made, including matchlocks, to have a government controlled chip installed in it so that they can determine when it will fire or not. Then we'd be crime free, right? Right?


17 posted on 03/23/2006 3:12:01 AM PST by Hardastarboard (HEY - Billy Joe! You ARE an American Idiot!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: endthematrix
Nice link and food for thought.

OK, here's my first feeble thought: Pick up a Gillette product, the RFD snaps your picture. You move to another aisle and ditch the razor blades in the soup section and proceed to the checkout. The checkout RFDs sense a theft has occurred and alarms sound resulting in your detention for shoplifting. You refuse to submit to a search until police are present.

When nothing is found you institute a huge lawsuit, win handily and live happily (and richly) ever after.

18 posted on 03/23/2006 3:32:40 AM PST by metesky ("Brethren, leave us go amongst them." Rev. Capt. Samuel Johnston Clayton - Ward Bond- The Searchers)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: ActionNewsBill

All your "rational lying' to the contrary Bill,the subject came up as it applied to security. ( I seem to recall)

It may be amazing news to you Bill, but we are at war, and are using all reasonable and lawful measures to detect our enemies activities before they annihilate our innocent ,non-combattant citizens any more than they already have.

Enemy sympathizers like you hate our country and seek to accuse our country of "illegal measures " to defend our freedoms.

We see right through your BS Bill and suggest you go do something indecent in your hat.

PS which Franklin are you misquoting? Aretha? or Who?


19 posted on 03/23/2006 2:25:56 PM PST by CBart95
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
All your "rational lying' to the contrary...

Perhaps you could point out where I lied. I stand by every word I posted.

It may be amazing news to you Bill, but we are at war, and are using all reasonable and lawful measures to detect our enemies activities before they annihilate our innocent ,non-combattant citizens any more than they already have.

"Necessity is the plea for every infringement of human freedom. It is the argument of tyrants; it is the creed of slaves."

William Pitt

You may be willing to give up your freedoms, but please do not presume to speak for anyone else here on this forum, or give away the freedoms of the rest of us..

Enemy sympathizers like you hate our country and seek to accuse our country of "illegal measures " to defend our freedoms.

So I am an "enemy sympathizer" because I support the the animating contest of freedom rather than the tranquility of servitude?

I guess that's a variation on the blatant lie "If you're not with us, you're with the terrorists".

"Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that you were our countrymen."

We see right through your BS Bill...

Seems to me that you and your sheep-like, anti-American views are in the minority here, sparky.

... and suggest you go do something indecent in your hat.

Well. I'm not quite sure what that means, but good luck with that.

Get that chip, dude, it's the only thing that will save you .


20 posted on 03/23/2006 4:13:21 PM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
PS which Franklin are you misquoting? Aretha? or Who?

Your ignorance of Ben Franklin's quote is duly noted.

21 posted on 03/23/2006 4:14:55 PM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: ActionNewsBill

And here I thought you were quoting the Delano Roosevelt Franklin.

Nice way to skirt the issue.

Your SCORN is devastating.

Remember the Hat,Billy!


22 posted on 03/23/2006 5:03:19 PM PST by CBart95
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
Your attempt at constructing a creative post was pitiful. I mean, really, stringing together a bunch of insults among a load of babbling was hardly effective... Maybe later in life, after you have learned to read and write, you will have more success.

True, these are rudimentary skills that many of us "normal" people take for granted that everyone has an easy time of mastering. But we sometimes forget that there are "challenged" persons in this world who find these things more difficult.

If I had known, that this was your case then I would have never read your post. It just wouldn't have been "right". Sort of like parking in a handicap space.

I wish you the best of luck in the emotional, and social struggles that seem to be placing such a demand on you.

23 posted on 03/23/2006 5:17:07 PM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: ActionNewsBill

Very charitable of you Bill.

Good to know that so-called "normal people" arm themselves with professionally prepared photos of sheep watching our President on TV.

Must be nice being a "normal" agent for the AlQueda.


24 posted on 03/23/2006 5:24:20 PM PST by CBart95
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
Good to know that so-called "normal people" arm themselves with professionally prepared photos of sheep watching our President on TV. Must be nice being a "normal" agent for the AlQueda.

Twenty-Five Ways To Suppress Truth: The Rules of Disinformation

5. Sidetrack opponents with name calling and ridicule. This is also known as the primary 'attack the messenger' ploy, though other methods qualify as variants of that approach.

Associate opponents with unpopular titles such as 'kooks', 'right-wing', 'liberal', 'left-wing', 'terrorists', 'conspiracy buffs', 'radicals', 'militia', 'racists', 'religious fanatics', 'sexual deviates', and so forth.

This makes others shrink from support out of fear of gaining the same label, and you avoid dealing with issues.

Example: 'You believe what you read in the Spotlight? The Publisher, Willis DeCarto, is a well-known right-wing racist. I guess we know your politics -- does your Bible have a swastika on it? That certainly explains why you support this wild-eyed, right-wing conspiracy theory.'

25 posted on 03/23/2006 6:03:52 PM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
Twenty-Five Ways To Suppress Truth: The Rules of Disinformation
26 posted on 03/23/2006 6:06:23 PM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: ActionNewsBill

While FREEP is off the air for the next 30 days you might wish to entertain yourself by looking up the meaning of "paranoid schizophrenia and adult psychosis".

And since we will have past his birthday celebration, let me pass on my Happy Birthday Adolph Hitler greetings to you now.

Please remember: they are really out to get you.


27 posted on 03/24/2006 5:47:40 AM PST by CBart95
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: joesnuffy
Controlling people...is what the new world odor is all about.

It's to identify and capture terrorists. To be against being personally traceable and trackable is tantamount to being soft on terror. If there is one more terrorist attack, it will be the fault of the people who are against tracking people with RFIDs.

28 posted on 03/24/2006 5:50:59 AM PST by Cboldt
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
And since we will have past his birthday celebration, let me pass on my Happy Birthday Adolph Hitler greetings to you now.

Sorry, you lose.

Goodbye now.

Enjoy your RFID tag.

29 posted on 03/24/2006 6:54:04 AM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: robowombat

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/religion/1574089/posts?page=1

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1578091/posts

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-bloggers/1586320/posts


30 posted on 03/24/2006 6:55:35 AM PST by Jonx6
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Cboldt
To be against being personally traceable and trackable is tantamount to being soft on terror. If there is one more terrorist attack, it will be the fault of the people who are against tracking people with RFIDs.

I assume you left off the "sarcasm" tag?

If you are being serious...there's really nothing more to say...you are utterly cluelsee.

31 posted on 03/24/2006 6:56:10 AM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: ActionNewsBill
I assume you left off the "sarcasm" tag?

I did leave off the "You can't name one right or abuse that would occur if everybody was required to have an RFID."

If you are being serious...you are utterly cluelsee.


32 posted on 03/24/2006 7:03:04 AM PST by Cboldt
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
contraire: controlling people who "have something to hide" is what it's all about...criminals.

Good luck marking the law abiding Christians with your tag.

But you go ahead and pony up and be tagged(and controlled).

33 posted on 03/24/2006 7:04:15 AM PST by Lady Heron
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Cboldt
"You can't name one right or abuse that would occur if everybody was required to have an RFID."

All U.S. citizens to receive National ID card by 2008

The Real ID Act, passed by Congress and signed by President Bush on May 11, 2005, mandates that all U.S. citizens will receive a National ID card (with RFID chip) by May of 2008.

Without this National ID, you won't...

* Drive your car
* Board a plane, train, or bus
* Enter any federal building
* Open a bank account
* Hold a job

If you can’t hold a job or have a bank account, how much buying and selling will you be able to do?

No National ID

34 posted on 03/24/2006 7:09:55 AM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
Wow. Methinks you are on quite the wrong website with the views you're expressing. What part of the concept of FreeRepublic do you not understand?
35 posted on 03/24/2006 7:10:48 AM PST by SW6906 (5 things you can't have too much of: sex, money, firewood, guns and ammunition.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Lady Heron
Good luck marking the law abiding Christians with your tag. But you go ahead and pony up and be tagged(and controlled).

It amazes me how many "sheep" here call themselves "conservatives".

36 posted on 03/24/2006 7:11:05 AM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: SW6906
Wow. Methinks you are on quite the wrong website with the views you're expressing.

Seems to be a few of these anti-freedom trolls on this thread.

37 posted on 03/24/2006 7:13:42 AM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: ActionNewsBill; CBart95
Godwin's Law
38 posted on 03/24/2006 7:16:10 AM PST by SW6906 (5 things you can't have too much of: sex, money, firewood, guns and ammunition.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: WoofDog123
Hi All-

That looks like a poster for a spooky sci-fi movie, not a government program. That actually sent chills up my spine, the notion that people would welcome this kind of surveillance blows my mind. It's even more shocking when so-called conservatives promote it.

~ Blue Jays ~

39 posted on 03/24/2006 7:17:17 AM PST by Blue Jays (Rock Hard, Ride Free)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Cboldt
"I did leave off the "You can't name one right or abuse that would occur if everybody was required to have an RFID."

How about this one (that has actually happened, though I can't find the article right now):

Couple decides to divorce. Wife plays the abuse card with no evidence whatsoever that any abuse has occurred in a ploy to gain full custody of the children. Wife gets grocery store to release records of purchases (through those little club cards - the precursor to RFID) showing how much beer is bought by husband. Wife successfully convinces court that she was likely abused because husband drank (in her opinion) too much beer. Wife convinces court husband has drinking problem despite his not having ANY problems with DUIs, work, or anything connected to alcohol. Family & friends testify that he does not drink heavily or have any problems.

Court awards custody to wife.

With RFID, there is no way to make any purchase anywhere anytime that cannot be later be used against you in some way. Think: alcohol. Guns. Ammunition. ANYTHING. Your purchase can be completely innocent, it's what the government or others do with that information that is troubling. Why some fail to see that befuddles me.

This doesn't even get into the tracking your movements aspect of it..........

40 posted on 03/24/2006 7:26:01 AM PST by SW6906 (5 things you can't have too much of: sex, money, firewood, guns and ammunition.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: ActionNewsBill; CBart95
Hi All-

CBart95, please quit while you're ahead. I see what you are trying to say in your posts, the unfortunate thing is we live in a world where people and programs are abused daily by those seeking greater power for themselves. Based on your writing style, I fear that you're likely a youngster who hasn't experienced enough in this world to speak about these surveillance techniques from a mature perspective. It is very common for young students to embrace a socialist approach to what they feel is "fair" and many folks in America tend to outgrow those notions as they become adults.

ActionNewsBill, you are absolutely 100% correct in what you've illustrated. I'm becoming more convinced that kids like CBart95 who grew up without witnessing firsthand totalitarian superpowers like the former Soviet Union can't grasp the theories or otherwise comprehend these threats. We'll just need to keep helping them right their ways and reverse the damage caused by television indoctrination, public education, and things like that. The idea of RFID use, cameras, monitoring staff, and other government surveillance programs is frightening for a free society.

~ Blue Jays ~

41 posted on 03/24/2006 7:39:18 AM PST by Blue Jays (Rock Hard, Ride Free)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: SW6906
Hi SW6906-

We're in complete agreement.

To add to your nightmare scenario, could you imagine the part of the testimony where the wife "forgets" to tell the court they had a huge backyard hamburger & hotdog barbecue with thirty-five friends and family members in attendance? Suddenly a couple cases of beer aren't quite so threatening. The so-called innocuous little RFID tags can't prove that part of the story, though.

~ Blue Jays ~

42 posted on 03/24/2006 7:46:52 AM PST by Blue Jays (Rock Hard, Ride Free)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: Blue Jays; ActionNewsBill; CBart95; Cboldt
Bill of Rights, 1st Amendment to the Constitution says:

"Congress shall make no law...abridging...the right of the people to peaceably assemble...

Suppose you were having a gathering of like-minded individuals to discuss politics in the 30 days before an election in violation of McCain/Fiengold campaign finance laws. If the driver's license or money or passport or anything you are required to carry has an RFID tag in it that identifies you directly, the government can know you were there and then use that information against you. If they have no way of knowing the movements of people in a free society without tagging us, we retain the right of the people to peaceably assemble.

Maybe a bit of a stretch, but indicative of the possibilities on that slippery slope we head down.

43 posted on 03/24/2006 8:56:01 AM PST by SW6906 (5 things you can't have too much of: sex, money, firewood, guns and ammunition.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: SW6906

SW you're over-reacting.

The McCain-Fiengold Bill does'nt prohibit assembly...it has nothing to do with lawful assembly.

So you are sending up a "Straw Man", presumably to promote confusion and undue concern over ridiculous hypothetical circumstances.

Overstating the "Enormous Threat To Individual Liberty" is a deliberate attempt to "Poison the Well".

These aren't conservative tactics, they are easily left-wing in nature and intended to undermine confidence in our leadership.


44 posted on 03/24/2006 4:32:01 PM PST by CBart95
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
These aren't conservative tactics, they are easily left-wing in nature and intended to undermine confidence in our leadership.

There's nothing "conservative" about advocating RFID tracking chips for all citizens.

That kind of thinking reeks of totalitarianism.

People should not be afraid of their governments, governments should be afraid of their people.

45 posted on 03/25/2006 11:14:37 AM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: ActionNewsBill

You might give some thought to reading what you see more accurately.

You seem to be off fighting windmills. Fact is you always appear "ready to go to battle". Is there something in your makeup that causes that pugnacity that you want to talk about? Say, a lifelong resentment?
Or a physical inadequacy? Maybe you are too short?

People who are always in attack mode never seem to be very happy.


46 posted on 03/26/2006 6:13:42 AM PST by CBart95
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: CBart95
Is there something in your makeup that causes that pugnacity that you want to talk about?

Yes...I do not like people who are willing to trade freedom for security.

It's simply un-American to do so.

47 posted on 03/26/2006 7:28:14 AM PST by ActionNewsBill ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: ActionNewsBill

There you go again.

Judging and making judgements.

A veritable "traffic Cop" of civil behavior issuing your "citations" right and left.

Oh well, idle hands are the Devil's playmates.

Toodles!


48 posted on 03/26/2006 7:33:10 AM PST by CBart95
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: ActionNewsBill

I will live my life by Franklin's words : "Those who give up essential liberties for security deserve neither".




I'll do Ben Franklin one better : "Those who give up their liberties in order to stay alive deserve to die."


49 posted on 04/19/2006 12:04:30 PM PDT by bigdcaldavis (Xandros : In a world without fences, who needs Gates?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson