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Bataan Memorial Death March draws thousands
ARNEWS ^ | Monte Marlin

Posted on 03/29/2006 3:13:01 PM PST by SandRat

Bataan Memorial Death March draws thousands

By Monte Marlin

More than 3,800 people, both military and civilian, representing all 50 states plus the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada and Korea participated in the 2006 Bataan Memorial Death March at White Sands Missile Range, N.M. on March 26.

More than 3,800 people, both military and civilian, representing all 50 states plus the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada and Korea participated in the 2006 Bataan Memorial Death March at White Sands Missile Range, N.M. on March 26.
Mike Smith

WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE, N.M. (Army News Service, March 29, 2006) – The 2006 Annual Bataan Memorial Death March was conducted March 26 at White Sands Missile Range, N.M. The event drew nearly 3,900 service members and civilians to the Army test range in southern New Mexico.

Marchers represented all 50 states as well as the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada and Korea.

The march offers a 26.2-mile course and a 14.2-mile course. Both take marchers through sandy trails and washes. The longer course includes an elevation incline from 4,100 to 5,300 feet, and has been called one of the toughest marathons in the U.S.

Honoring WWII heroes

Now in its 17th year, the memorial march honors a special group of World War II heroes who were responsible for the defense of the islands of Luzon, Corregidor and the harbor defense forts of the Philippines.

The conditions they encountered and the aftermath of the battle were unique. The Soldiers fought in a malaria-infested region, surviving on half or quarter rations with little or no medical help, using outdated equipment and virtually no air power.

On April 9, 1942, about 75,000 Filipino and U.S. soldiers were surrendered to Japanese forces. The Americans were Army, Army Air Corps, Navy and Marines. Among those seized were members of the 200th Coast Artillery, New Mexico National Guard.

The prisoners were forced to march about 100 kilometers north in the scorching heat of the Philippine jungles to Camp O'Donnell, a prison camp. During the journey, prisoners were beaten randomly and denied food and water for several days. Those who fell behind were executed, and thousands died.

Survivors faced the hardships of living in the POW camp. Others were wounded or killed when U.S. air and naval forces sank unmarked enemy ships transporting prisoners of war to Japan.

Survivors show support

More than 30 survivors of the infamous Bataan Death March attended the memorial march, greeting participants at the start and finish lines.

Bataan survivor John Mims traveled from North Carolina to be a part of the day.

“It’s important every year that I be here,” Mims said, “I don’t care if I have to crawl, or how I have to get here. I want to be here because I owe it to these people who come out each year to support us.”

The next Bataan Memorial Death March is scheduled for March 25, 2007.

(Editor’s note: Monte Marlin works for the White Sands Missile Range Public Affairs Office.)


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; US: New Mexico
KEYWORDS: bataan; death; draws; march; memorial; thousands

by Kevin Casey

March 29, 2006

Volunteers offer water and sports drink to marchers along the route.


by Mike Smith

March 29, 2006

Patriotism ran high during the 2006 Bataan Memorial Death March at White Sands Missile Range. Many participants carried flags to honor the nation and contributions of American warfighters.

1 posted on 03/29/2006 3:13:02 PM PST by SandRat
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To: 2LT Radix jr; 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub; 80 Square Miles; A Ruckus of Dogs; acad1228; AirForceMom; ..

2 posted on 03/29/2006 3:13:38 PM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: SandRat
Patriotism ran high during the 2006 Bataan Memorial Death March

Not nearly as high as at the original though.

3 posted on 03/29/2006 3:17:06 PM PST by Michael.SF. (Well, Kerry did win the exit polls.)
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To: SandRat

Did any Japanese show up?


4 posted on 03/29/2006 3:46:17 PM PST by EricT. (CA conservatives only serve to inflate the number of electoral votes won by the Dems.)
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To: SandRat

Bump for my Father in law who survived that original march...


5 posted on 03/29/2006 4:02:10 PM PST by JDoutrider
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To: EricT.

Don't know.


6 posted on 03/29/2006 4:07:51 PM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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To: JDoutrider

"Bump for my Father in law who survived that original march..."

My mother's cousin was also a survivor. He survived the march, but saw several friends killed. In the camp, he survived by repairing the shoes/boots of the guards.


7 posted on 03/29/2006 4:09:27 PM PST by Owl558 (Pardon my spelling)
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To: SandRat

About 40 years ago I read something interesting in a survival book I had.

It said that after the surrender of US forces, the death toll was so high at the Battan death march because many of the prisoners were city boys who stood around waiting for someone to take care of them.
The country boys were not about to surrender to some "slant eyed g**ks" and took to the hills to join the gurrillas fighting the Japanese.

I don't know if this is true or not. I have known one survivor back in the early 1960's and he still had physical problems due to being a POW there.


8 posted on 03/29/2006 5:10:25 PM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar
Part of the reason for my incredible respect for the US Marine Corp is the fact they don't leave wounded.
At the USMC base in my hometown, there were a number of vet's, some had survived the Hell Ships (Marus), others were old 4th Marine guys from the P.I.s.
I still don't own or will ever own a Jap vehicle out of respect for their memory.
9 posted on 03/29/2006 5:15:49 PM PST by investigateworld (Abortion stops a beating heart)
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To: SandRat
I'm glad to see this, what with all the bleeding hearts fawning over Jap relocation camps in America. The only thing that I found kind of funny was this statementment in the article:

The longer course includes an elevation incline from 4,100 to 5,300 feet, and has been called one of the toughest marathons in the U.S.

Here in my neck of the woods, we have a marathon that starts below sea level in Death Valley and goes to over 8,000 feet in elevation at the base of 14,496' Mt. Whitney.

10 posted on 03/29/2006 5:32:39 PM PST by Inyo-Mono (Life is like a cow pasture, it's hard to get through without stepping in some mess. NRA.)
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar
many of the prisoners were city boys...

I believe that statement is false. I knew of several that were surrendered because of a sense of duty and following the orders of their superiors. The men I know were from North Texas (Wichita Falls area) and rural West Tennessee. There is a museum dedicated to the men of Bataan in Wichita Falls that was destroyed by the April 10th, 1979, tornado (F-5).

11 posted on 03/29/2006 5:53:39 PM PST by vetvetdoug
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To: JDoutrider

My uncle also. He wrote a book about it, Late summer of 1941 and my war with Japan. He is still alive, and lots of family attends the memorial march.

The book is so understated it is almost ridiculous. He covers the bomb on Nagasaki (which he saw) in just 3 or 4 sentences. He went to the end of the war in their camps. He worked in the mines, was beaten, had TB, beriberi and pellagra, was bombed, had bowel surgery with just a shot of novacaine, and watched his friends die.

When I read the book, I can't understand how he survived. I wouldn't have lived two days. It's incredible.


12 posted on 03/29/2006 10:52:57 PM PST by I still care ("For it is the doom of men that they forget" - Merlin, from Excalibur)
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To: SandRat

Very interesting thread, SandRat. Thank you.


13 posted on 03/29/2006 10:58:40 PM PST by nutmeg (NEVER trust democRATs with our national security)
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To: StarFan; Dutchy; alisasny; BobFromNJ; BUNNY2003; Cacique; Clemenza; Coleus; cyborg; DKNY; ...
ping!

Please FReepmail me if you want on or off my ‘miscellaneous’ ping list.

14 posted on 03/29/2006 10:59:24 PM PST by nutmeg (NEVER trust democRATs with our national security)
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To: SandRat

BTTT


15 posted on 03/30/2006 3:04:12 AM PST by E.G.C.
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To: nutmeg; SandRat; Owl558
My father's best friend survived one of the prison camps in the Philippines. He was the son of a shoemaker who saved every penny during the Depression, when people had their shoes repaired instead of buying new ones, and managed to send his boy to medical school.

I know for sure that he helped the prisoners, mostly by insisting that they eat the beans they were given, which they thought made their bowel problems worse but Johnny knew was the only high-quality protein they were getting.

He came home thin as a rail and ate only one small meal a day for the rest of his life.

Bump for Johnny Rizzolo

16 posted on 03/30/2006 10:32:59 AM PST by firebrand
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To: SandRat
Bataan survivor John Mims traveled from North Carolina to be a part of the day.

“It’s important every year that I be here,” Mims said, “I don’t care if I have to crawl, or how I have to get here. I want to be here because I owe it to these people who come out each year to support us.”

John is my next door neighbor and a fine American. He is on up there in age and his health isn't all that great. He lost his wife, Juanita, a couple of years ago as well as his granddaughter, Elizabeth (Wendy), to a drug overdose not long after. He is as kind as they come and never fails to tell his stories to my kids. Just some info on one of these vets.

17 posted on 03/30/2006 10:49:50 AM PST by PleaseNoMore
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To: PleaseNoMore

The Boy Scout Troop on Ft Huachuca went and did the march as a Scout Troop instead of attending the District Camporee last weekend.


18 posted on 03/30/2006 4:30:27 PM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country. What else needs to be said?)
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Proviso East High School Bataan Commerative Research Project
19 posted on 03/30/2006 4:37:29 PM PST by OneLoyalAmerican (Even if your mother says she loves you, check it out.)
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To: I still care

Considering what they endured, it's amazing that there are any Bataan survivors still alive!


20 posted on 03/30/2006 4:39:02 PM PST by CarolinaGOP ("A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both." - Dwight D. Eisenhower)
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To: CarolinaGOP

Considering what they endured, it's amazing that there are any Bataan survivors still alive!

**
Amen to that!
God bless those men. And God bless all of our fighting men - past and present.

For anyone reading this, past or current military, thank you so much for protecting our country and our freedoms.


21 posted on 03/30/2006 7:09:10 PM PST by Bigg Red (Never trust Democrats with national security.)
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