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Virgil's Demi-God City 'Found'
ANSA ^ | 4-6-2006

Posted on 04/07/2006 11:09:48 AM PDT by blam

Virgil's demi-god city 'found'

Castor and Pollux fought Aeneas at Amyclae

(ANSA) - Rome, April 6 - Italian archaeologists believe they have found an ancient city where the demi-gods Castor and Pollux fought Aeneas, the Trojan hero whose descendants founded Rome .

Lorenzo and Stefania Quilici of Bologna and Naples universities claim the large, massive-walled settlement dating from the VI to III Century BCE was the city of Amyclae, believed by Renaissance scholars to be somewhere near Lake Fondi between Rome and Naples .

"The road there is a perfectly preserved stretch of the ancient Via Appia," said Lorenzo Quilici .

"After a tough climb we found the remains of the old city, which appears to have been destroyed by an earthquake, given the way the rocks have tumbled onto one another" .

"The size of the settlement - 33 hectares - made us think of a city that left its mark on the area," Stefania Quilici said .

That is when they began to think of Amyclae, a city founded by the twin sons of Zeus Castor and Pollux whose Spartan followers clashed with Aeneas .

In the Aeneid, the epic poem recounting Aeneas's voyage from Troy to Italy, Virgil does not say exactly where the city was .

But many scholars think it is buried under a town of the same name in Greece. The ancient settlement discovered by the Quilicis sits atop a heavily wooded hill in the Aurunci National Park .

Rome archaeological director Anna Maria Reggiani said: "It's safe for the moment from incursions because it's in such an impervious zone" .

"But we'll have to wait for funding in order to start a dig"


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: aeneas; aeneid; amyclae; aurunci; castor; catastrophism; city; demigod; earthquake; found; godsgravesglyphs; greece; italy; lorenzoquilici; pollux; remus; romanempire; romulus; sparta; stefaniaquilici; trojanwar; troy; vergil; viaappia; vigils; virgil; zeus

1 posted on 04/07/2006 11:09:52 AM PDT by blam
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To: SunkenCiv

GGG Ping.


2 posted on 04/07/2006 11:10:27 AM PDT by blam
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To: blam
"But we'll have to wait for funding in order to start a dig"

Ahhhh, in searh of the Golden Fleece...........

3 posted on 04/07/2006 11:13:43 AM PDT by Red Badger (I must not fear.Fear is the mind-killer.Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.....)
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To: blam
I don't see any reason in the article to think that this was the original city...just because it's 33 hectares?

And VI to III cent BC would be too late for Aeneas' settlement...?

4 posted on 04/07/2006 11:16:41 AM PDT by Siena Dreaming
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To: 24Karet; 3AngelaD; 4ConservativeJustices; A. Patriot; A.J.Armitage; abner; ABrit; ACelt; adam_az; ..
Thanks Blam.
In the Aeneid, the epic poem recounting Aeneas's voyage from Troy to Italy, Virgil does not say exactly where the city was. But many scholars think it is buried under a town of the same name in Greece.
Interesting.

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5 posted on 04/07/2006 11:20:06 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Claud

Magna cum murmurae montis!


6 posted on 04/07/2006 11:26:14 AM PDT by Antoninus (I don't vote for liberals regardless of their party affiliation.)
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To: Siena Dreaming

Just so. Rome was probably founded about 753 BC.

And according to The Aeneid, Virgil landed at the mouth of the Tiber 333 years before the founding. Three years to the building of his son's little city, 33 years to Alba Longa, and 333 years to Rome.

Which means that this city should date back considerably earlier. Maybe there are older ruins underneath, as at Troy?


7 posted on 04/07/2006 11:42:56 AM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Cicero
Maybe there are older ruins underneath

Could be. I still don't see any good reason given in the article, though, to believe this is the spot.

8 posted on 04/07/2006 11:45:38 AM PDT by Siena Dreaming
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To: blam
Claude Lorraine, Aeneas's farewell to Dido in Carthage.


9 posted on 04/07/2006 11:45:48 AM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Siena Dreaming

Me neither.


10 posted on 04/07/2006 11:46:06 AM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: blam

"But many scholars think it is buried under a town of the same name in Greece."

Uh-oh - here come the EU family squabbles.

This may not be what they hope it to be, but something interesting may lay beneath. This could be their way to angle for funding.


11 posted on 04/07/2006 11:57:12 AM PDT by BlessedByLiberty (Respectfully submitted,)
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To: BlessedByLiberty

Amyclae (Amyklai) was one of the five villages which together formed ancient Sparta (Lacedaemon), located about 3 miles south of the other four. There was another Amyklai on the south coast of Crete.


12 posted on 04/07/2006 4:07:49 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: blam

Will be interesting to hear of what the dig produces.


13 posted on 04/07/2006 6:29:49 PM PDT by Dustbunny (The only good terrorist is a dead terrorist)
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To: blam
Ok, I may be very dense but why does that picture look like a rock but the caption says "Virgil's demi-god city 'found'"? Were Castor and Pollux turned into stone, immortalized by the gods... what's up with that huge stone?
14 posted on 04/07/2006 11:43:08 PM PDT by Blind Eye Jones
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15 posted on 02/08/2010 1:03:56 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: 75thOVI; agrace; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aragorn; aristotleman; Avoiding_Sulla; ...

Note: this topic is from 4/7/2006. Thanks blam.
After a tough climb we found the remains of the old city, which appears to have been destroyed by an earthquake, given the way the rocks have tumbled onto one another".



16 posted on 05/27/2013 5:54:46 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itri#History

[snip] The first direct documentary record of Itri dates to 914, but settlements in the neighbourhood existed from prehistoric times, as proved by findings from the Neolithic and the Bronze Ages.

According to legend, Itri’s origins appear to coincide with the destruction of Amyclae, a maritime city founded by the twin sons of Zeus, Castor and Pollux, whose Spartan followers clashed with Aeneas. It certainly originated from a Greek colony, which likely came from the coast at about 20 km north of Fondi. Amyclae was founded between Lake Fondi and the Terracina coast, on the limits of murky waters of the swamps present at the time. The quiet Amyclaeans were struck by the cursed and numerous forces of the swamp, unstoppable beings such as the monstrous serpent with nine heads, the Lernaean Hydra, which attacked from the swamps with poisonous venom, and whose heads would re-grow as quickly as Hercules could slice them off with his sword. The city of Amyclae was soon annihilated. The few survivors abandoned the city and relocated a few kilometers south to the area now known as Itri. These first inhabitants of Itri adopted the emblems of the “Signum Salutis”, a serpent, as their symbol of power, and “Amycleus”, the dog’s head, as their symbol of fidelity. Itri in fact was most likely a town of the Aurunci, later conquered and assimilated by the Romans.

The name Itri derives from the Latin word iter, meaning “route” or “way”, appropriate since the city lies where the old Roman Via Appia, built in 312 BC, crosses the Monti Aurunci by way of a narrow pass, the Gola di Sant’Andrea, called by Charles Dickens a “noble mountain pass”. An alternative hypothesis on the origin of the town’s name suggest it derived from the cult of the Eastern God Mithra, as there is a large subterranean temple dedicated to him a few hundred meters south of the town. Still another suggestion is that it derives from the Greek for snake “hydra”, pronounced in some dialects as “itra”. [/snip]


17 posted on 05/27/2013 6:21:39 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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