Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Woe Is Me, Me, Me [Generation X/Reagan]
Newhouse News ^ | 4/20/2006 | Evelyn Theiss

Posted on 04/21/2006 11:54:15 AM PDT by Incorrigible

Woe Is Me, Me, Me

BY EVELYN THEISS

They are brash and cynical. They believe they're entitled to quick financial and professional success. They're also lonely and anxious.

That's the picture that psychologist Jean Twenge draws in her new book about the young men and women she dubs "Generation Me."

On the plus side, these young people are confident and also extremely tolerant of those who are different from them. Born in the 1970s, '80s and '90s, they are the children of baby boomers, who she says were incorrectly considered the most self-focused generation.

Not even close, says Twenge, an associate professor at San Diego State University.

She's 34, and therefore part of "GenMe," as she calls it. She has spent more than a decade gathering data on what makes this group different from generations that came before. The results are the subject of her new book, "Generation Me: Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled - and More Miserable Than Ever Before."

Two trends are at the core of the book, says Twenge. They emerged in her comparison of personality tests given by researchers to thousands of boomers when they were young and to those in Generation Me in recent years.

"One is that there has been an incredible rise in self-esteem and belief in the individual; and on the flip side, there's been a large rise in anxiety and depression," she says.

Twenge suggests that the two biggest influences in increasing self-esteem were schools and the proliferation of self-help media -- though parents also played a part.

While students in earlier generations felt good about themselves when they accomplished something, now their self-esteem is high even if their performance is poor and they didn't put any effort into doing better, she says.

Twenge isn't the first researcher who has come down on the self-esteem movement. Former Hoover Institution research fellow Charles Sykes in the mid-1990s published a book called "Dumbing Down Our Kids: Why American Children Feel Good About Themselves But Can't Read, Write or Add."

And Twenge has her critics, including psychotherapist and author Belleruth Naparstek, who disagrees with Twenge's theory that increasing self-esteem has done such damage.

"I haven't read the study, but I think it's a matter of definition," says Naparstek. "I believe that any young adult who has cultivated his or her self-esteem has also cultivated a sense of compassion and responsibility to others, and I don't think that is missing in any way with this generation."

According to Twenge, her research shows that young people 30 and 40 years ago cared what other people thought of them, while the philosophy of today's youth is that what others think doesn't matter.

She says GenMe has been taught by parents and teachers that "you can be anything you want to be." So when young people see celebrity singers, actors and athletes on television shows and in magazines that celebrate their wealth, they develop unrealistic, even grandiose, ideas about what they will have and be able to afford.

With college, health care and housing costs skyrocketing, and jobs being exported to other countries, it's no surprise that young people get anxious and depressed when they slam up against economic and competitive realities, Twenge says.

Unrealistically high expectations might have been fueled by grade inflation in high school, Twenge says. Nearly half of students who were college freshman in 2004 had an A average, compared with 18 percent in 1968, according to a report by the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA. That occurred even as SAT scores declined over the years, and far fewer students reported studying six hours a week.

Many young people learned they didn't have to work all that hard in school to be rewarded, she says. So who can blame them for thinking those easy rewards will carry over to the work world.

Sykes says he isn't surprised at what Twenge's work shows.

"If you spend your life in a bubble-wrap of feel-good self-esteem, the real world is going to come as a rude shock," he says. "The self-esteem movement wasn't designed to prepare children for adulthood or adversity; it didn't prepare them for the bumps and bruises of life."

But Naparstek says it isn't just young people who have been negatively affected by the emphasis on celebrities.

"This whole business of translating success into strictly material terms leaves everyone addicted to goodies and starving for them," she says. "It makes people want to fill their emptiness with stuff, but I don't think that's strictly an issue for young people -- it makes everyone crazy."

Twenge says studies show that twice as many young people reported symptoms of panic attacks in 1995 compared with 1980. While the suicide rate for middle-aged people has declined steeply since 1950, the suicide rate for young people has more than doubled.

Twenge theorizes that besides dashed expectations about life, other factors contributing to depression and anxiety are the loneliness and isolation that many young people face as they are likelier to live alone, postpone marriage and hook up sexually rather than having dating relationships.

April 20, 2006

(Evelyn Theiss is a staff writer for The Plain Dealer of Cleveland. She can be contacted at etheiss@plaind.com.)

Not for commercial use.  For educational and discussion purposes only.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: babyboomers; boomers; genx
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-73 next last
So, it's the Baby Boomer's fault that kids today are messed up!
1 posted on 04/21/2006 11:54:17 AM PDT by Incorrigible
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
They are brash and cynical. They believe they're entitled to quick financial and professional success. They're also lonely and anxious.

Take out the "brash" and "financial" part and I guess that's me.

2 posted on 04/21/2006 11:56:19 AM PDT by pcottraux (It's pronounced "P. Coe-troe.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible

Wait a minute, now "GenX" is only from the '70s up? What happened to the late '60s?

And I think it's funny she uses the epithet "Gen Me" when it was the sainted Hippies (some of the Baby Boomers) who came up with the epithet "the Me Generation" for those immediately after them coming of age in the '70s.

Proves to me the Hippies always get away with everything - including calling everyone else "Gen ME" while they themselves ironicaly ARE exactly that (despite this woman's claims).


And 1 other thing....I'm sick of this.....

....WE GEN X WEREN'T ALL RAISED BY HIPPIES!!!!! (Proud daughter of "Silent Gen".)


3 posted on 04/21/2006 11:59:09 AM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: qam1

ping


4 posted on 04/21/2006 12:09:17 PM PDT by kenth
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: the OlLine Rebel

My two gen X kids are doing very well, and I am proud of them.


5 posted on 04/21/2006 12:11:48 PM PDT by ClaireSolt (.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible

Parents play a huge role in the development of a generation. I don't blame all boomers as my parents were boomers. They instilled in me a strong work ethic which has served me well. However, I saw lots of my peers being spoiled rotten and being handed everything on a silver platter. Now may of these spoiled children are moving back home since they can't achieve instant career success and buy a 3,000 sf home in a trendy area.

I made peanuts for my first 7 years out of college. My wife and I lived in cracker-box apartments for a time, and then finally purchased a very modest home. However, I gained great experience, and have reached a point in my career when I can now afford some of the things my parents have. It took me over 10 years, but that's made it all the more satisfying.


6 posted on 04/21/2006 12:12:48 PM PDT by VegasCowboy ("...he wore his gun outside his pants, for all the honest world to feel.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
And when those me-focused children start making life care decisions for their boomer parents and the SocSec bonds start coming out of the lockbox requiring massive tax hikes to pay them off ... hoo boy!

Give up those dreams of using the equity in your home to afford a nice assisted living facility. Junior's gonna have other plans for you, starting with a search for Judge Greer, Jr., all the while muttering about your deteriorated quality of life. Think that "we're here for your liver" Monty Python skit was cute? How about if it played out "your quality of life has sunk below acceptable levels" "no, it hasn't! I'm perfectly happy" "no, sorry, that's it for you! Now where did you put that life insurance policy?"

7 posted on 04/21/2006 12:17:07 PM PDT by NonValueAdded ("Too soon to remember??? How about TOO SOON TO FORGET!" from Mr. Silverback)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: the OlLine Rebel

Generation X
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from Gen X)
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Generation X (disambiguation).
Generation X is a term for the generation of people born in the Western world (especially people born in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United States and the United Kingdom) following the post-World War II baby boom generation. While the exact dates bounding this age demographic are highly debated, those born from the 1960s to the early 1980s are generally agreed-upon as possible members of this group. The term is used in demography, the social sciences, and marketing, though it is most often used in pojklkpular culture. The generation's influence over pop culture began in the 1980s and has only grown in the 1990s and 2000s.

Although the origins of the term "Generation X" go back at least as far as the early 1960s, it was popularized by Douglas Coupland's 1991 novel Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture, in which Coupland describes the angst of those born between roughly 1960 and 1965, who, while technically part of the Baby Boom Generation, feel no connection to its cultural icons. In Coupland's usage, the "X" of Generation X referred to the namelessness of a generation that was coming into an awareness of its existence as a separate group while at the same time feeling completely dwarfed and culturally overshadowed by the Baby Boomer generation of which it was ostensibly a part. The term Generation X has come to mean something else in popular usage (see below), having been appropriated by the generation following the Baby Boomers -- leaving Coupland's Generation X once again nameless. Generation X has also been described as a generation consisting of those people whose teen years were touched by the 1980s, although many who are considered part of this generation had their teenage years stretching into the 1990s.

Another common description of Generation X includes within it those people who grew up in a period of transition (1945–1990) beginning with the end of World War II and the decline of colonial imperialism and ending with the fall of the Berlin Wall and the end of the Cold War. Thus, the transition between colonialism and globalization is thought to separate the Baby Boomers from the Baby Busters, a sub-generation of Generation X made up of the earliest born members.


8 posted on 04/21/2006 12:20:57 PM PDT by Icelander (Legal Resident Since 2004)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
So, it's the Baby Boomer's fault that kids today are messed up!

Of course -- it is always somebody else's fault.

As a university professor, I found the following excerpts from the article to be especially interesting:

While students in earlier generations felt good about themselves when they accomplished something, now their self-esteem is high even if their performance is poor and they didn't put any effort into doing better, she says. . . .

Unrealistically high expectations might have been fueled by grade inflation in high school, Twenge says. Nearly half of students who were college freshman in 2004 had an A average, compared with 18 percent in 1968, according to a report by the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA. That occurred even as SAT scores declined over the years, and far fewer students reported studying six hours a week.

The self-esteem movement certainly has a lot to answer for. So do the colleges and universities, which have let standards fall so far.

9 posted on 04/21/2006 12:23:45 PM PDT by Logophile
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible

Many good things in this article. First, I am considered a generation X because I was born in 1969, but the article says that the complainers started in 1970 so I guess I am safe from that...
Second, my parents are boomers (born in 1946) and I think they did a splendid job on us three. I am 37, my brother will be 35 and my sister is 33. I have three kids, my sister has three kids and my brother has not had any children yet because I don't think his wife can have them. I have been married for 12 years, my sister 10 years, and my brother for 7 years. My parents are going to be married 39 years this year. So don't worry about what they say about baby boomers. You guys did a great job.


10 posted on 04/21/2006 12:25:22 PM PDT by napscoordinator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: napscoordinator

Stop being so nice to Baby Boomers! I love the smell of Boomer bashing in the morning!


11 posted on 04/21/2006 12:29:06 PM PDT by Incorrigible (If I lead, follow me; If I pause, push me; If I retreat, kill me.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
The one thing that will always separate us Gen-X'ers from other generations is that we are the first generation to grow up in broken homes.

How that can be left out of the study is beyond me.

Also, the first generation where God was kicked out of the schools, abortion was legal and glorified, among other things.

12 posted on 04/21/2006 12:30:56 PM PDT by yellowdoghunter (I sometimes only vote for Republicans because they are not Democrats....by Dr. Thomas Sowell)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: VegasCowboy

What?

What you did was "delay gratification" and well, that just isn't going to work now.

Today, I can take a pill to be happy. I can sue someone to be rich. I can eat what I want and have surgery to clean up the mess. I can sleep with who ever I want. I can wear my pants around my knees and complain about being judged. I don't need to work. After 12 years of school I can't speak English or balance a check book. I don't want to be responsible. Did I mention I have to take a pill to be happy?


13 posted on 04/21/2006 12:32:55 PM PDT by mad puppy ( Freeper SirChas: you will be missed.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: kenth; ItsOurTimeNow; PresbyRev; tortoise; Fraulein; StoneColdGOP; Clemenza; m18436572; ...
Xer Ping

Ping list for the discussion of the politics and social (and sometimes nostalgic) aspects that directly effects Generation Reagan / Generation-X (Those born from 1965-1981) including all the spending previous generations (i.e. The Baby Boomers) are doing that Gen-X and Y will end up paying for.

Freep mail me to be added or dropped. See my home page for details and previous articles.

14 posted on 04/21/2006 12:39:31 PM PDT by qam1 (There's been a huge party. All plates and the bottles are empty, all that's left is the bill to pay)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: yellowdoghunter

Exactly. Would we "need" 20 million illegal alians working in the USA if 40 million of GenX hadn't been aborted?


15 posted on 04/21/2006 12:42:57 PM PDT by Incorrigible (If I lead, follow me; If I pause, push me; If I retreat, kill me.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: NonValueAdded
And when those me-focused children start making life care decisions for their boomer parents and the SocSec bonds start coming out of the lockbox requiring massive tax hikes to pay them off ... hoo boy!

Give up those dreams of using the equity in your home to afford a nice assisted living facility. Junior's gonna have other plans for you, starting with a search for Judge Greer,

Dearest Junior,

All of our finances are locked up tighter than a drum and you have access to none of it. You never made it into the will and a power-of-attorney has taken away any diabolical decisions you thought were going to be yours to make. Kiss it goodbye, Junior.

Love & kisses,
Mom and Dad

P.S. We always did like your sister better than you.

16 posted on 04/21/2006 12:43:01 PM PDT by DumpsterDiver
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible

Bingo.


17 posted on 04/21/2006 12:46:49 PM PDT by SquirrelKing
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
Exactly. Would we "need" 20 million illegal alians working in the USA if 40 million of GenX hadn't been aborted?

I know. It hurts my heart to think about it. So many children who never even got a chance in this great country of ours.

18 posted on 04/21/2006 12:47:57 PM PDT by yellowdoghunter (I sometimes only vote for Republicans because they are not Democrats....by Dr. Thomas Sowell)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible

Stop being so nice to Baby Boomers! I love the smell of Boomer bashing in the morning!


LMAOROTF.


19 posted on 04/21/2006 12:48:48 PM PDT by napscoordinator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
"If you spend your life in a bubble-wrap of feel-good self-esteem, the real world is going to come as a rude shock,"

Image hosting by Photobucket

20 posted on 04/21/2006 12:53:24 PM PDT by Centurion2000 (Every man must be tempted, sometimes,to hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
"I haven't read the study, but I think it's a matter of definition," says Naparstek. "I believe that any young adult who has cultivated his or her self-esteem has also cultivated a sense of compassion and responsibility to others, and I don't think that is missing in any way with this generation."

What has this woman been smoking?

21 posted on 04/21/2006 12:57:46 PM PDT by Malacoda (The Posting Police need an enema.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
"So, it's the Baby Boomer's fault that kids today are messed up!"
Yes, of course. "Spare the rod..." - whom is this saying addressed to, if not to the parents and in loco parentis figures??
22 posted on 04/21/2006 1:00:43 PM PDT by GSlob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
For the love of God, I wish we'd stop with trying to stereotype, classify, or otherwise describe, on a macro level, the different generations. This psuedo-scientific bravo sierra is just some Sociology 101 bullsh*t this miserable little twerp foists on the public to sell books.

People just love to look at themselves in mirrors.

23 posted on 04/21/2006 1:02:13 PM PDT by Hemingway's Ghost (Spirit of '75)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
She has spent more than a decade gathering data on what makes this group different from generations that came before. The results are the subject of her new book, "Generation Me: Why Today's Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled - and More Miserable Than Ever Before."

More confident because they weren't the providers of trash reading, didn't waste a decade of their lives conjuring it, and are more miserable for being pounded with it via someone who focus's like a LASER beam on information that is worthless except for bending minds and self gratification.

24 posted on 04/21/2006 1:03:11 PM PDT by EGPWS
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kenth

Let's not blame this on the men of generation X. We aren't avoiding marriage because it interferes with our online gaming. In America the laws regarding marriage are stacked against men. How many times would you cross the street if there were more than a 50% chance you weren't going to make it to the other side?

I am an X'er and almost all of my friends are of the same generation. I have friends who wish to have families but they can't find any American women in their late 20's, who want to settle down. The gals are all too busy chasing the 10% of American men they find desirable, building "careers" and partying. I have been approached by women in their mid-30's who have one or two illegitimate children and a sexual history twice as long as the coolest jock I knew in High School. Not interested thanks. Feminism wanted women to act like the worst caricatures of men and to destroy the family. Mission accomplished!

Instead of risking (another) marriage to an American woman, (who initiate 70% of the divorces in the US and who have everything to gain by it), I and many of my friends have decided to concentrate on building enough wealth to retire while we are young enough to enjoy it somewhere more man friendly.


25 posted on 04/21/2006 1:12:09 PM PDT by DragonflyX
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: yellowdoghunter
The one thing that will always separate us Gen-X'ers from other generations is that we are the first generation to grow up in broken homes. How that can be left out of the study is beyond me. Also, the first generation where God was kicked out of the schools, abortion was legal and glorified, among other things.

This is so true and we've paid a huge price that has really begun to set in. For example, I knew a woman who had six, yes six abortions, was totally materialist, spent most her money on nice clothes, nice cars, she binge ate then threw it all up. She had at best one two year long relationship with a man that ripped her off. According to her she was empowered. Last year she died from cancer at age 40 with nor real relationship. This woman considered herself a Buddihist and very spiritual. But she screwed people over all the time. To the end she voted Democrat.

Seeing this all around me eventually brought me back to conservative values and believing in God. I was a latch key kid and man, when the solution of God was offered to me, it was like finally having a guiding parent and some stability. I wonder if some of this is true for the generations that follow and partially explains the movement back toward religion-the stability, love and esteeming values that where so attacked when we grew up. Also my generation have aborted so many babies as a birth control method, I just want to cry when I think of it and what our nation and the world has lost from all this selfish self centered destruction. /rant

26 posted on 04/21/2006 1:19:20 PM PDT by GOP Poet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible

No wonder my HS class was the smallest in a long time....('87)


27 posted on 04/21/2006 1:22:56 PM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: GOP Poet
I wonder if some of this is true for the generations that follow and partially explains the movement back toward religion-the stability, love and esteeming values that where so attacked when we grew up.

I think it is. More and more of my generation are turning back to the values of their grandparents and great-grandparents. Which of course were Faith, Family, and Country.

Have you heard the term, "Crunchy Conservatives"? It is a book that is out about how many in our generation are returning to a more simple life, etc...

Do a search on that word or "Crunchy Cons" here on FR and read what you can about it. I agree with most of what I have read. I hope the trend continues.

BTW...I am so glad you came back to the one and true Father. Welcome Home.

28 posted on 04/21/2006 1:24:53 PM PDT by yellowdoghunter (I sometimes only vote for Republicans because they are not Democrats....by Dr. Thomas Sowell)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: DumpsterDiver

ROFL!


29 posted on 04/21/2006 1:25:07 PM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: GSlob

Oh heavens! My, my oh my, you beast!

"Spare the rod...."

Why, why...the most Reverend Dr. Spock ruled that mentality out long ago! :-o


30 posted on 04/21/2006 1:31:36 PM PDT by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: EGPWS

"More confident because they weren't the providers of trash reading, didn't waste a decade of their lives conjuring it, and are more miserable for being pounded with it via someone who focus's like a LASER beam on information that is worthless except for bending minds and self gratification."

Damn right. "Entitled to success without working for it"

That sounds mysteriously like SocialSecurity, and we all damn well know that GenX was, like, totally responsible for creating _that_ program.


31 posted on 04/21/2006 1:32:34 PM PDT by Jason Kauppinen
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Hemingway's Ghost
For the love of God, I wish we'd stop with trying to stereotype, classify, or otherwise describe, on a macro level, the different generations.

Yeah. Personally I blame the Gen-X'ers for that.

People just love to look at themselves in mirrors.

True again. While I'm sure there are hordes of people more self-absorbed than myself, what's in it for me?

32 posted on 04/21/2006 1:39:14 PM PDT by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: DragonflyX

I understand completely what you are saying. (I am a female by the way). But have you ever tried finding a lady at your church, or place of worship?


33 posted on 04/21/2006 1:39:37 PM PDT by yellowdoghunter (I sometimes only vote for Republicans because they are not Democrats....by Dr. Thomas Sowell)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: yellowdoghunter

Thanks so much! I just looked up the Crunchy Conservatives book and read an excerpt. It completely resonates. I hope it continues as well. I really appreciate the acknowledgment it made me tear up. :-)


34 posted on 04/21/2006 1:44:41 PM PDT by GOP Poet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: GOP Poet

You are more than welcome.


35 posted on 04/21/2006 1:47:29 PM PDT by yellowdoghunter (I sometimes only vote for Republicans because they are not Democrats....by Dr. Thomas Sowell)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
They are brash and cynical. They believe they're entitled to quick financial and professional success. They're also lonely and anxious.

Hmmm... but, wait:

Born in the 1970s, '80s and '90s, they are the children of baby boomers, who she says were incorrectly considered the most self-focused generation.

Ahh, so maybe the only reason I'm not brash, cynical, lonely, anxious, and with a sense of entitlement is because my folks were a little too old to be boomers (1942 and 1943)? Or maybe vast over-generalizations are just that...

36 posted on 04/21/2006 1:50:29 PM PDT by Kaylee Frye
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GOP Poet

My immediate thought was the same as yellowdoghunter's. That seems like a perfect place for many reasons, the least of which is being with someone that has solid core values that one can rely on and trust to help build a loving, lasting relationship. Money can only replace that spiritual and relational place for only so long in my experience.


37 posted on 04/21/2006 1:51:46 PM PDT by GOP Poet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
Kids!

Who can understand what they do or say?

Why can they be like we were -- perfect in every way?

What's the matter with kids today?

38 posted on 04/21/2006 1:53:48 PM PDT by chs68
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible

I weep for the future.

Sounds like a lot of people are in for a very rude awakening.

It ought to be fun to watch.


39 posted on 04/21/2006 1:55:52 PM PDT by surely_you_jest
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Centurion2000

40 posted on 04/21/2006 1:56:43 PM PDT by Warhammer (Appeasing terrorists is like throwing steaks at a tiger hoping he becomes a vegetarian.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: yellowdoghunter
But have you ever tried finding a lady at your church, or place of worship?

I do not know about prior generations, but I can state with a fair amount of confidence and experience that the women a GenX-er (like me) will meet in church have the same basic issues and characteristics that you will likely find in any other broad sub-population of women. I've met a lot of nice conservative atheist women with very traditional qualities and a lot of neurotic feminazi women who never missed a day of church. And all sorts of people in between.

For better or worse, church does not seem to select for either personality or ideology. At the end of the day, people will be people regardless of their particular set of beliefs or where they tend to spend their time. Most of the really interesting women I've met, I met in places where I was neither expecting nor intending to meet women.

The best way for a guy to find a nice marriageable woman is to meet a lot of women, it is that simple. It is not like the perfect one will just show up on your doorstep some day. Of course, I'm not married, so my advice is worth what was paid for it. :-)

41 posted on 04/21/2006 2:03:46 PM PDT by tortoise (All these moments lost in time, like tears in the rain.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: yellowdoghunter

I met my ex-wife at church. Honestly I am 35 now and the chances of me finding a nice woman who doesn't have children are pretty slim so I don't worry about it. A couple of years ago I realized that almost every instance of emotional turmoil in my life was the result of having a woman in my life. I have a dog and a motorcycle now and I have never been happier.


42 posted on 04/21/2006 2:04:08 PM PDT by DragonflyX
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: yellowdoghunter

"The one thing that will always separate us Gen-X'ers from other generations is that we are the first generation to grow up in broken homes. How that can be left out of the study is beyond me. Also, the first generation where God was kicked out of the schools, abortion was legal and glorified, among other things."

Excellent points, all. How those points can be ignored shows the slant of this article and a lot of current "research" on "kids these days." ;)


43 posted on 04/21/2006 2:04:26 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save The Earth. It's The Only Planet With Chocolate.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: DragonflyX

Point taken. I wish you the best.


44 posted on 04/21/2006 2:16:26 PM PDT by yellowdoghunter (I sometimes only vote for Republicans because they are not Democrats....by Dr. Thomas Sowell)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible
If any kid has a right to be angry with the way she had to grow up it's my own daughter. She was born 3 months after Reagan took office. I had to raise her without her mother. But is she angry? No. She's conservative, compassionate, funny, brilliant, gorgeous (biased dad talking here) ... and she's in college studying to become a social worker ... and she wants to work with children. I don't buy this "me me me" stuff at all when it comes to her and her generation. They've seen, first hand the true "ME" generation: us. The boomers and OUR parents. The ones who foisted social "security" on hers and her children's and grand-children's generations. And we didn't have the decency to have enough children to support our socialist solutions. And people wonder why I'm so hostile towards "moderates" ...
45 posted on 04/21/2006 2:31:25 PM PDT by manwiththehands (Lead, follow or shut up.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Incorrigible

"While students in earlier generations felt good about themselves when they accomplished something, now their self-esteem is high even if their performance is poor and they didn't put any effort into doing better, she says."

I guess this is why Bush and the D.C. clan are just fine with DOING NOTHING about the borders...


46 posted on 04/21/2006 2:32:13 PM PDT by Mrs. Darla Ruth Schwerin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: DragonflyX
Wow, you summed it up perfectly.

I'm in the same position. I'm 32 (almost 33), never married, no bastard children. I have a fantastic career, great income and a sizeable retirement portfolio that is growing handsomely and I'm debt free. I'd consider myself decently attractive (7 outta 10), too at 6'1", 180lb and of a fit build.

I can't get dates with any 1 woman beyond a month or so because just about all the women my age (25-35) say I'm "just not fun enough" when the definition of fun is late nights out, drinking, and terrible hangovers 3-5 days of the week. Now all that aside, I am incredibly funny, just not "fun".

I am seriously thinking about importing a bride from Asia or South America. Have you or your friends ever talked about this?

I also certainly do not want to have 50% of my life's work taken from me because of "irreconcilable differences ".

47 posted on 04/21/2006 2:56:05 PM PDT by xrp (Fox News Channel: MISSING WHITE GIRL NETWORK)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Icelander

This description is why I get so mad that I (born in 1973) am termed "Generation X". I read Generation X. A lot of the things that should be my memories are things I was too little to remember. But, I am sure my 42 year old neighbor does.


48 posted on 04/21/2006 3:09:57 PM PDT by HungarianGypsy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: HungarianGypsy
At my most cynical, I blame the feminist movement for doing terrible things to a couple generations of American women. In short, the feminists made it seem to be a bad thing to be a woman

My whole college years (70's) generation of women were terribly confused... they didn't want to be feminine, because that was bad, but they didn't know how to act like men either. They were confused and unhappy and finally impossible.

The most telling moment for me was when I (out of habit and training) opened a restaurant door for my date who suddenly said, "Don't you think I'm smart enough to open a door for myself?"....wow.

This younger generation of women are more balanced (IMHO) but few are feminine... they all want to run around in baggy sweatshirts and drink your beer.

That classic female trait of only having sex in return for loyalty seems gone... a bad trait for anyone who can end up pregnant. Now the standard disclaimer - these are only my opinions, and I've been married to the same woman for 25 years....but then, again, she's not an American.

49 posted on 04/21/2006 3:50:37 PM PDT by lOKKI (You can ignore reality until it bites you in the ass)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: xrp

xrp: I am seriously thinking about importing a bride from Asia or South America. Have you or your friends ever talked about this?



We have talked about this but it seems that it is our society and laws which favor women over men is the problem. When guys bring women here from overseas they are quickly corrupted. I love the USA I grew up in, served it for 5 years in the military and never dreamed of leaving but it seems like retiring in some place like Costa Rica may be the best option.


50 posted on 04/21/2006 4:17:33 PM PDT by DragonflyX
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-73 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson