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Navy sailors get Army training at Fort Jackson
http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/14380222.htm ^ | 4 20 06 | SUSANNE M. SCHAFER

Posted on 04/24/2006 8:51:41 AM PDT by freepatriot32

FORT JACKSON, S.C. - Navy sailors are trading sea legs for land combat as the U.S. Army is opening its largest training base to help them survive when sent into Afghanistan or Iraq.

The Navy is sending thousands of men and women to support Army units in those regions and wants its sailors to hone their fighting skills.

"Hit the ground and brace yourself with your weapon!" senior drill instructor Warren Brown yelled at a dozen trainees slithering across a mud-soaked field. "Look around, pick yourself up and go! You're under fire!"

After struggling up from the mud with her M-16 in hand, Petty Officer 2nd Class Jade Permenter insisted Brown's instructions to keep her head and butt down might save her life someday.

"This is excellent training, really. It will be very helpful. I'm headed to Iraq. I need this," said the 34-year-old reservist nurse from Columbus, Ohio.

So far, some 1,200 sailors have gone through an intense, two-week course crammed with the basics of basic training: learning to fire M-16 rifles, toss hand grenades and conduct house-to-house patrols while weighted down with body armor - tactics normally foreign to those accustomed to life aboard a ship.

They learn the ins-and-outs of improvised explosive devices - the roadside bombs that have been exacting a deadly toll on American servicemen and women. They learn how to take and give instructions while under fire on a convoy and how to enter a booby-trapped building.

"They are eager to learn, they are like sponges," Brown said of his trainees, many of whom are 30-or-40-something senior officers headed to staff jobs in the Middle East. "It's not about being Army or Navy anymore. The name of the game is staying alive."

Cmdr. Kevin Aandahl, spokesman for the Navy's Education and Training Command in Pensacola, Fla., said the program may train up to 10,000 sailors over the coming months.

On a visit to the training field, Fort Jackson commander Brig. Gen. James Schwitters said the course was designed to give the Navy sailors "battlefield awareness."

"It's how to survive, if they need to survive. It's knowing what to do, what action to take to support those around you and not to do things that would make a situation worse than it is," Schwitters said.

In a pouring rain, small groups of sailors, guided by a drill instructor, learned to use "Army speak" while searching a building for explosive devices.

"Stack on me!" yelled the leader as several ran up against a building, calling out a number and direction as they moved past each another. After checking the door, they swept inside as each trained their weapon on a different segment of the room.

"Huaaaahhh!" They yelled, giving the Army's rallying cry.

At Fort Jackson, the sailors spend 12 to 16 hours a day in training over the two-week period. Normal Army basic training lasts about nine weeks. Some 50,000 Army trainees go through Fort Jackson's training or advanced schools every year.

While fresh Army recruits spend two to three weeks training with their weapons, the sailors have only two to three days to acquaint themselves with the rifles. But unlike the Army recruits, the sailors are not required to pass the rigorous qualification tests before moving on to other posts. Nevertheless, it is a lot to take in, trainers say.

"It's like putting a firehouse in your mouth," said Army Lt. Col. Doug Snyder, who is in charge of the training unit. "It's remarkable what we are putting these sailors through."

The goal is not to emerge "combat ready," Snyder said. However, he said, "They could protect themselves or others. And these skills could be greatly expanded upon" once they reach their posts.

Lt. Cmdr. Ed Moninger, of Seattle, is a reservist headed to Kuwait to manage supplies. "I'm a manager for Amazon.com, so what I do in civilian life is a little like what I do for the Navy."

Moninger, 37, said the training at Fort Jackson reminded him of workouts he had at the Naval Academy. "In the Navy, we're very technical, very specialized in our jobs. But the Army is much more physical."

Petty Officer 3rd Class Sahraie Waheed, of Slate Hill, N.Y., said he volunteered for the training and is headed for Iraq. The idea of being "ground-based," is fine with the 24-year-old, since he has a lot of friends who are Marines, Waheed said. He declined to say exactly what his job was, saying it was classified.

"Personally, I was motivated by 9/11," Waheed said. "But I think we're all doing this to ensure that our fellow soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines come home safely."


TOPICS: Government; News/Current Events; US: South Carolina
KEYWORDS: anamericansoldier; army; fortjackson; get; iraq; navy; sailors; southcarolina; training; waheed

1 posted on 04/24/2006 8:51:44 AM PDT by freepatriot32
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To: freepatriot32

The US Navy used to do this type of training themselves before the Zumwalt era. Zippy destroyed the US Navy.


2 posted on 04/24/2006 8:53:46 AM PDT by zzen01
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To: freepatriot32
This makes sense - it's a different kind of war we're facing today - and our enemy has no large navy or command of the seas...while we need more 'boots on the ground'

But don't tell the old generals - they don't understand

3 posted on 04/24/2006 8:56:21 AM PDT by maine-iac7 ("...but you can't fool all of the people all of the time," Lincoln)
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To: Gumlegs

Ping.


4 posted on 04/24/2006 8:56:29 AM PDT by Junior (Identical fecal matter, alternate diurnal period)
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To: freepatriot32
Why wouldn't the Navy go to the Marine Corp for this type of training?

Does the Army need the money or something?

5 posted on 04/24/2006 8:58:43 AM PDT by AFreeBird (your mileage may vary)
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To: AFreeBird
"Why wouldn't the Navy go to the Marine Corp for this type of training?"

The marines do not have the patience. lol

6 posted on 04/24/2006 9:00:31 AM PDT by verity (The MSM is comprised of useless eaters)
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To: zzen01

I did this type of training when Admiral Zumwalt was CNO. It was with the Marines at Camp Pendleton.
Admiral Zumwalt was an outstanding CNO.


7 posted on 04/24/2006 9:02:42 AM PDT by em2vn
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To: maine-iac7

Precisely.

Conventional "force on force" battles are a thing of the past.

Fighting and winning a guerilla war is our mission.

The enemy we face is the lowest form of scum, who abides by no Geneva Convention, Court of Law, International Law (whatever that is), etc...

Americans who enter the fight in the desert require training to defeat the unconventional thug and his random IEDs, RPGs and uncoordinated mortar attacks.

Survival, Escape and Resistance Training is also appropriate given the increasing Mohammedan use of hostage situations.


8 posted on 04/24/2006 9:04:50 AM PDT by Emmet Fitzhume ("Shining with brightness, Always on surveillance.")
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To: verity; AFreeBird
Why wouldn't the Navy go to the Marine Corp for this type of training?

The marines do not have the patience. lol

exactly :-)

9 posted on 04/24/2006 9:05:42 AM PDT by freepatriot32 (Holding you head high & voting Libertarian is better then holding your nose and voting republican)
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To: freepatriot32

That, and I suspect that the Navy would probably prefer to eat Army dirt, than to admit that they need the Maines, rather than the Marines needing them, as they like to claim.


10 posted on 04/24/2006 9:08:23 AM PDT by AFreeBird (your mileage may vary)
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To: AFreeBird
Why wouldn't the Navy go to the Marine Corp for this type of training?

Because the graduates of this course are going on to fill combat support billets for Army units. Most of the graduates of the two week course will do jobs inside the wire at Forward Operating Bases.

There is a separate six week course for the Navy personnel who are filling the Army Civic Affairs billets. That class is training formed units to run reconstruction teams.

11 posted on 04/24/2006 9:10:02 AM PDT by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: zzen01

Can someone please post a picture of Steve McQueen and his BAR from "The Sand Pebbles?"


12 posted on 04/24/2006 9:12:54 AM PDT by paddles
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To: AFreeBird
Why wouldn't the Navy go to the Marine Corp for this type of training?

If the sailors are going to be on the ground with Army units... why wouldn't they train with Army units?

This story is an excellent example of why I believe we should consolidate our entire military - just have the United States Armed Forces.

13 posted on 04/24/2006 9:14:15 AM PDT by Terabitten (The only time you can have too much ammunition is when you're swimming.)
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To: zzen01

Marine DI's train the SeaBees in combat tactics.


14 posted on 04/24/2006 9:15:26 AM PDT by B4Ranch (Immigration Control and Border Security -The jobs George W. Bush doesn't want to do.)
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To: freepatriot32
They are eager to learn

Knowing you are going downrange encourages the will to learn.

FWIW, I know BG Schwitters. He is a good leader, an all around good guy with a good family.

15 posted on 04/24/2006 9:16:37 AM PDT by Gamecock ( "I save dead people" -- God (Eph 2:5)
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To: AFreeBird

Your observation on this matter is a repetition of a fallacious and oft repeated rumor. The Navy and Marines operate very well together, and while there is a friendly and sometimes rough competition between them, they respect and admire each other for their merits.


16 posted on 04/24/2006 9:17:35 AM PDT by ExpatGator (Progressivism: A polyp on the colon politic.)
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To: B4Ranch

Likewise Navy Corpsmen on their way to support the Fleet Marine Forces will attend what used to be an 8-9 week Field Medical Service School where they are drilled by a Marine Drill Instructors. I suspect that the Marine Corps is stretched too thinly right now and the Army is doing this additional trainig because they have they have the personnel, facilities, etc. to accomplish it.


17 posted on 04/24/2006 9:26:37 AM PDT by fatrat
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To: freepatriot32

Arrrrmy training, SIR!

18 posted on 04/24/2006 9:28:06 AM PDT by Yo-Yo (USAF, TAC, 12th AF, 366 TFW, 366 MG, 366 CRS, Mtn Home AFB, 1978-81)
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To: ExpatGator
The Navy and Marines operate very well together, and while there is a friendly and sometimes rough competition between them, they respect and admire each other for their merits.

You're absolutely right about that! We have Navy and Army at this Marine base and there's none of that "old school" BS about the Army being a bunch of stupid grunts or the Marines being the "Navy's Army", or the squids being a bunch of sissies. (I've heard the stories of how the branches ragged on each other a long time ago) Everyone works together here and respects each other and it's awesome to see! :o)
19 posted on 04/24/2006 9:34:20 AM PDT by misty4jc
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To: AFreeBird
They said the Marines didn't have the personnel or facilities to take the influx of Navy trainees.

Of course, I don't belive that, and the sailors should have done this at Camp Pendelton or San Diego.
20 posted on 04/24/2006 9:35:46 AM PDT by DesScorp
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To: fatrat

Personally I think that may be why we got along with the grunts so well. More than once I swung at a dogface just because the grunt beside me in the bar was needing somebody to watch his back.


21 posted on 04/24/2006 9:36:48 AM PDT by B4Ranch (Immigration Control and Border Security -The jobs George W. Bush doesn't want to do.)
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To: freepatriot32

"It's like putting a firehouse in your mouth," said Army Lt. Col. Doug Snyder, who is in charge of the training unit. "It's remarkable what we are putting these sailors through."



I sure hope the good Army Colonel didn't say what they quoted him as saying. I hope he was trying to say they put a fireHOSE in their mouths.


22 posted on 04/24/2006 9:45:14 AM PDT by Ro_Thunder ("Other than ending SLAVERY, FASCISM, NAZISM and COMMUNISM, war has never solved anything")
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To: B4Ranch

"Personally I think that may be why we got along with the grunts so well. More than once I swung at a dogface just because the grunt beside me in the bar was needing somebody to watch his back."

Well that and you had stuff we needed like bulldozers, plywood, electrical wire, etc. to make our lives a little more comfortable when we were at base camp. When we first arrived at Chu Lai it was a luxury to have 3 small pieces of 2x4 to put under the legs of our cots to keep them from sinking into the sand. without those pieces of wood you would find yourself sleeping on the sand by about midnight and you would be surprised how hard that sand could be.


23 posted on 04/24/2006 9:55:43 AM PDT by fatrat
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To: fatrat

C-Rats boxes did the same trick.


24 posted on 04/24/2006 10:01:09 AM PDT by B4Ranch (Immigration Control and Border Security -The jobs George W. Bush doesn't want to do.)
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To: zzen01

2 week course? Good luck. I had 8 weeks in Alpha Company at Ft. Jackson..the meanest DI not behind bars as well. Thank God.


25 posted on 04/24/2006 10:04:47 AM PDT by TET1968
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To: paddles

26 posted on 04/24/2006 11:03:28 AM PDT by joesnuffy
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To: joesnuffy

Yep, that's "Hol-mang" Thanks!


27 posted on 04/24/2006 11:18:00 AM PDT by paddles
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To: Junior

I been pung. Thanks.


28 posted on 04/24/2006 12:10:22 PM PDT by Gumlegs
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To: paddles

29 posted on 04/24/2006 12:13:42 PM PDT by Gumlegs
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To: Terabitten
This story is an excellent example of why I believe we should consolidate our entire military - just have the United States Armed Forces.

I don't. I don't want Army down in the hole of a 1200 PSI propulsion plant. What is worse is the ongoing consolidation of ratings in the Navy which were already too diverse. My rating included Turbines, reduction gears, air craft elevators, cryogenics, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration. etc. It took months just to train someone to be a competent watch in these places. My rating Machinist Mate is now combined with Boiler Technicians as well.

As one who has been in the Navy and afterward went into an artillery unit in the Army National Guard there are major issues and the Pentagon and Sec of Defense needs to stop the combining jobs downsizing nonsense.

The ones training for this seem to be corpsmen or Medics in Army terms.

I enlisted in 1976 and never saw a weapon but a ,22 for an hour in basic. We had Marines {now gone} and Gunner Mates who specifically trained in that. A weapon below decks is useless.

30 posted on 04/24/2006 1:02:07 PM PDT by cva66snipe (If it was wrong for Clinton why do some support it for Bush? Party over nation destroys the nation.)
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To: paddles

The Sand Pebbles was a great flick that detailed quite accurately as to how well trained most swabbies were for sevice in boarding parties. Once upon a time they were actually "naval infantry" in the mold of the Japanese Naval Infantry who fought the US Marines so fiercely at Tarawa. Oh how the times have changed due to the likes of Elmo Zumwalt and Clinton era feminization.


31 posted on 04/25/2006 10:12:28 AM PDT by DMZFrank
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To: zzen01
Zippy destroyed the US Navy.

I was there and witnessed the distruction. The main reason I didn't stay in.

32 posted on 04/25/2006 10:19:07 AM PDT by WesternPacific
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