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Immigrants should wear RFID tags
the Inquirer ^ | Thursday 01 June 2006 | Nick Farrell

Posted on 06/02/2006 3:29:59 AM PDT by ovrtaxt

VeriChip reveals its colours

By Nick Farrell: Thursday 01 June 2006, 15:41 AFTER YEARS OF insisting that VeriChip RFID technology will not be used for Big Brother purposes, the company's chairman has proposed tagging immigrant and guest workers in the United States.

Scott Silverman, Chairman of the Board of VeriChip Corporation seems to have got carried away when being interviewed on "Fox & Friends" when responding to the Bush administration's call to know "who is in our country and why they are here".

He suggested that if foreigners were tagged using VeriChip RFID implants at the border, the technology could verify their identities in the workplace.

So far, VeriChip has found willing subjects among people who want their medical information implanted so a hospital can get all their details in cases of emergencies.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: aliens; bigbrother; bravenewworld; chipimplants; illegal; immigration; rfid; solusat; tagging; verichip
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This Silverman is a clown. He's determined to make an Orwellian human market for his product.

Great. Instead of punishing illegals and the crooks who hire them, let's HERD THE LEGAL ONES LIKE CATTLE.

Perfect.

1 posted on 06/02/2006 3:30:03 AM PDT by ovrtaxt
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To: ovrtaxt

VeriChip... in the game DeusEx there was a compagny of evil people used by even more evil people bent on world domination. It was called VeriLife. It also implanted chips, be it remote controlled termination chips.

How prophetic.


2 posted on 06/02/2006 3:33:44 AM PDT by S0122017
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To: ovrtaxt
I don't want anyone and I mean Anyone tagged like an animal.

Theres no need to get this rfid tagging started because it will be just be the same as this "Tamper Proof" ID card, you give it to one group and the courts will say all or none. This gov't will opt for all, make no mistake about that.

This whole situation really only requires the gov't do one thing. Just enforce the existing Damn Law!

3 posted on 06/02/2006 3:41:24 AM PDT by Kakaze (American: a Citizen of the United States of America........not just some resident of said continent)
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To: S0122017

There's another one called 'Digital Angel'.

http://www.digitalangelcorp.com/

To be fair, they claim that they don't pursue the human implant market.


4 posted on 06/02/2006 3:41:42 AM PDT by ovrtaxt (My donation to the GOP went here instead: http://www.minutemanhq.com/hq/index.php)
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To: Kakaze

I hear ya dude. It's just too easy for the power grabbers in DC to do that. There's nothing in it for them.

Sad that it's come to this.


5 posted on 06/02/2006 3:43:21 AM PDT by ovrtaxt (My donation to the GOP went here instead: http://www.minutemanhq.com/hq/index.php)
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To: ovrtaxt

VeriChips for both Illegals Aliens and Mutants!

tin foil hats for everyone else!


6 posted on 06/02/2006 3:46:54 AM PDT by truemiester (If the U.S. should fail, a veil of darkness will come over the Earth for a thousand years)
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To: ovrtaxt
"Great. Instead of punishing illegals and the crooks who hire them, let's HERD THE LEGAL ONES LIKE CATTLE."

Actually, it's a good idea. An excellent way to tell when TEMPORARY visitors to the US overstay their visas. Have'em removed if and when the prospective immigrant reaches "permanent resident" status.

7 posted on 06/02/2006 3:48:28 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
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To: ovrtaxt

I wouldn't even do that to an illegal alien. I might consider it for the people who hire illegals and congressmen.


8 posted on 06/02/2006 3:49:51 AM PDT by cripplecreek (Never a minigun handy when you need one.)
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To: Wonder Warthog

I have a better idea. When a temporary Visa comes up expired, issue a warrant.

I don't see the difficulty?


9 posted on 06/02/2006 3:51:03 AM PDT by ovrtaxt (My donation to the GOP went here instead: http://www.minutemanhq.com/hq/index.php)
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To: cripplecreek

lol Implant tracking devices for all elected officials? Maybe we could put a Tazer device in there too, and give them shock therapy every time they voted for a spending bill.


10 posted on 06/02/2006 3:52:27 AM PDT by ovrtaxt (My donation to the GOP went here instead: http://www.minutemanhq.com/hq/index.php)
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To: Wonder Warthog
An excellent way to tell when TEMPORARY visitors to the US overstay their visas.

Like having all law-abiding gun owners register their guns. Also you can kiss the tourist industry goodbye along with $200B spending and associated tax revenue.

11 posted on 06/02/2006 3:57:03 AM PDT by palmer (Money problems do not come from a lack of money, but from living an excessive, unrealistic lifestyle)
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To: ovrtaxt
If we wind up with an actual guest worker program, tattoo the expiration date in "day glow" ink on their foreheads.
12 posted on 06/02/2006 3:58:54 AM PDT by ncountylee (Dead terrorists smell like victory)
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To: cripplecreek
I wouldn't even do that to an illegal alien. I might consider it for the people who hire illegals and congressmen.

I think you may have something with the congress critters. I know I'd feel a lot safer on the road and about corruption in Washington in general if my congress critter had a chip installed.

13 posted on 06/02/2006 3:59:11 AM PDT by Rightwing Conspiratr1
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To: Wonder Warthog
" Actually, it's a good idea. An excellent way to tell when TEMPORARY visitors to the US overstay their visas "

Sounds great at fisrt blush, but it wont happen that way.

It will go from "catch and Release" to Catch, Tag & Release", followed by a full color graph of the wandering migrant.

The only thing enforced in the end will be the tagging of every American to satisfy th aclu, the courts and the left in general.

This is a bad bad suggestion, the hope is we will all become used to ( conditioned ) to using this technology, much like some gleefully accept drug dog sweeps and seatbelt / dui roadblocks.

Don't give up your rights for a sliver of implied security.

14 posted on 06/02/2006 4:00:56 AM PDT by Kakaze (American: a Citizen of the United States of America........not just some resident of said continent)
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To: cripplecreek
Would you consider it for your car?

What else do you think EZ Pass is??


15 posted on 06/02/2006 4:03:55 AM PDT by conservatism_IS_compassion (The idea around which liberalism coheres is that NOTHING actually matters except PR.)
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To: Kakaze

Personally I suspect that the people who would love this the most are the open border crowd. They would use it as a weapon.


16 posted on 06/02/2006 4:06:00 AM PDT by cripplecreek (Never a minigun handy when you need one.)
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To: conservatism_IS_compassion

What's my car have to do with anything?


17 posted on 06/02/2006 4:06:51 AM PDT by cripplecreek (Never a minigun handy when you need one.)
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To: palmer
"Like having all law-abiding gun owners register their guns.

Nope---not the same. We're talking people who are NOT CITIZENS. I don't care particularly if the Feds pass restrictions on the abilities of non-citizens to own guns.

"Also you can kiss the tourist industry goodbye along with $200B spending and associated tax revenue."

Nah--they'll come here anyway.

18 posted on 06/02/2006 4:15:22 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
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To: Kakaze
"Don't give up your rights for a sliver of implied security."

I'm not planning on giving up any rights. Remember, we're talking a bunch of people who are NOT citizens. When they talk about doing this for citizens, THEN I'll protest as strongly as anyone.

19 posted on 06/02/2006 4:17:17 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
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To: ovrtaxt
"I have a better idea. When a temporary Visa comes up expired, issue a warrant. I don't see the difficulty?"

And how do you plan to find them to enforce that warrant???

20 posted on 06/02/2006 4:18:52 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
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To: ovrtaxt
This one needs a photo of someone with a huge EAR TAG.

Too early for me to photoshop... pretend its radio and use your imagination.
21 posted on 06/02/2006 4:19:43 AM PDT by Barney59 ("Time wounds all heels.")
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To: ovrtaxt
There's a longer and more detailed article .. HERE.

It has more facts and less hyperbole.

Proposal to Implant Tracking Chips in Immigrants

BTW, the President of Columbia agrees that for Columbian 'temporary workers' in the US it wouldn't be such a bad idea.

22 posted on 06/02/2006 4:31:25 AM PDT by Condor51 (Better to fight for something than live for nothing - Gen. George S. Patton)
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To: Wonder Warthog

Oh, I suppose if someone applies to work for me and they don't have proper ID, I'll call the cops. Or if I get into a wreck with someone like that, or if they get pulled over, or if their employer gets audited for payroll taxes, or any number of things. Many of them will turn up.

Couple that with these following items, and they won't be hanging around the US for very long:

1 end the anchor baby policy

2 end welfare benefits for non-citizens

3 end subsidized health care and public education for non-citizens

4 swift and harsh jailtime for employers of illegals, plus seizure of assets

5 build a 1951 mile wall from the Pacific to the Gulf

6 allow non-citizens to cross into Mexico with impunity

7 Pass the FairTax

8 overthrow the current Mexican regime and install a non-corrupt, capitalistic government


23 posted on 06/02/2006 4:33:07 AM PDT by ovrtaxt (My donation to the GOP went here instead: http://www.minutemanhq.com/hq/index.php)
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To: ovrtaxt

"This Silverman is a clown. He's determined to make an Orwellian human market for his product."

Once again, my tagline says it all!


24 posted on 06/02/2006 4:57:17 AM PDT by DH (The government writes no bill that does not line the pockets of special interests.)
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To: ovrtaxt
"Many of them will turn up."

But what percentage?? I agree with all the sanctions you propose, but the use of RFID on non-permanent residents is another useful tool that can make the overall job easier.

25 posted on 06/02/2006 5:13:11 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
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To: S0122017

You know, I was wondering why that sounded so familiar! Thank you for reminding me of that.

That was a fun game.


26 posted on 06/02/2006 5:15:20 AM PDT by Personal Responsibility (Amnesia is a train of thought.)
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To: ovrtaxt
I thought they already do retinal scans for new immigrants?
27 posted on 06/02/2006 5:21:20 AM PDT by varyouga (I no longer fear death. I only fear the day when the DUmmies take over.)
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To: Wonder Warthog
"Actually, it's a good idea. An excellent way to tell when TEMPORARY visitors to the US overstay their visas. Have'em removed if and when the prospective immigrant reaches "permanent resident" status."

I'm pretty sure back-alley surgeons will start removing these tags from illegals as soon as they are introduced. Plus, RFID only works relatively short distances from the scanner so it is only useful for access purposes and not as a beacon. It will only inconvenience legal visitors.

Storing a retinal scan should be adequate for ID purposes.
28 posted on 06/02/2006 5:27:18 AM PDT by varyouga (I no longer fear death. I only fear the day when the DUmmies take over.)
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To: cripplecreek

I get flamed every time I say this but

Think NWO


29 posted on 06/02/2006 5:31:12 AM PDT by Halgr (Once a Marine, always a Marine - Semper Fi)
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To: ovrtaxt
That would be a good way to close the border. Instead of tens of millions of visitors to the U.S., there would be next to zero. ANd all the foreign owned comanies that have in sourced to the U.S. would more their operations out of the country. And people delivering good s and services in and out of the country would stay out. It's the perfect plan to isolate the U.S. completely from the rest of the world.

It would be even more true when other nations reciprocate by mandating Americans have chips implanted when they leave the U.S. What's fair for foreign citizens in the U.S. is equally fair for Americans travelling abroad.

30 posted on 06/02/2006 5:39:29 AM PDT by doc30 (Democrats are to morals what and Etch-A-Sketch is to Art.)
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To: varyouga
Plus, RFID only works relatively short distances from the scanner so it is only useful for access purposes and not as a beacon. It will only inconvenience legal visitors.

RDIF chips can be shielded. Anything that blocks radio waves will interfere with RDIF technology. No joke - just wrap whatever has an RDIF in aluminum foil and you have defeated the technology. If the chip is in your head....

31 posted on 06/02/2006 5:41:19 AM PDT by doc30 (Democrats are to morals what and Etch-A-Sketch is to Art.)
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To: ovrtaxt
Yeah and once they are tracked the government will know where they are so they are out of harms way when this traitorous government starts rounding up legal citizens.
32 posted on 06/02/2006 5:46:44 AM PDT by jetson
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To: ovrtaxt

Mark of the Beast bump!


33 posted on 06/02/2006 5:54:09 AM PDT by JimRed ("Hey, hey, Teddy K., how many girls did you drown today?" (Hello, I'm a TAGLINE virus. Please help m)
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To: ovrtaxt

DOC (Digital Angel Corp) is a subsidiary of Applied Digial...


34 posted on 06/02/2006 6:13:00 AM PDT by Dubh_Ghlase
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To: ovrtaxt

So all the ones that actually go through the checkpoints, will get tagged, and the ones that cross illegally, won't?


35 posted on 06/02/2006 6:18:34 AM PDT by stuartcr (Everything happens as God wants it to.....otherwise, things would be different.)
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To: ovrtaxt

Won't put one in my dog, so why would I sudmit to have one?


36 posted on 06/02/2006 6:27:36 AM PDT by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: Kakaze
I fear for anyone who even thinks about trying to implant me or mine....

This is precisely why the Founding Fathers gave us the Second Amendment


37 posted on 06/02/2006 6:32:21 AM PDT by Crispus Attucks Patriot
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To: ovrtaxt
Yeah, plant them things in immigrants and illegals, then tomorrow they will plant them in everyone under saying it is for our own good. Hitler, Stalin and Mao would be proud.
38 posted on 06/02/2006 6:34:13 AM PDT by Americanexpat (A strong democracy through citizen oversight.)
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To: Personal Responsibility

Yeah I liked that game too.


39 posted on 06/02/2006 6:36:06 AM PDT by S0122017
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To: ovrtaxt

Foreigners? Most of us are foreigners depending on how you draw the line. Yhy stop with foreigners. Let's just implant everyone with a 666 chip on their forehead and be done with it.


40 posted on 06/02/2006 6:49:53 AM PDT by plain talk
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To: ovrtaxt
Ahead of my time, as usual
41 posted on 06/02/2006 6:56:54 AM PDT by thoughtomator (A thread without a comment on immigration is not complete)
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To: ovrtaxt

Bad idea NEXT!


42 posted on 06/02/2006 7:00:00 AM PDT by SQUID
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To: ovrtaxt

Digital Angel is a subsideary of Applied Digital Solutions, Inc.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1564815/posts
Digital Angel and Microchip

VeriChip is also a subideary of Applied Digital Solutions, Inc.

Solusat is the Mexican affiliate of VeriChip.


http://www.adsx.com/newsarticles/01.htm

Implantable Chips Get Under Skin of Security Experts

Charles J. Murray
1,690 words
26 July 2004
Electronic Engineering Times
4
1331
English
Copyright (c) 2004 CMP Media LLC

Chicago - The science-fiction-like prospect of planting chips inside the human body took on a decidedly real flavor last week, in the wake of an admission by the Mexican Attorney General that he and 160 government officials have been "chipped."

Applied Digital Solutions Inc., maker of the so-called VeriChips that were used, acknowledged that its distributor sold the chips to the Mexican government late last year. The Palm Beach, Fla., company then added fuel to the firestorm by saying that it is also working with banks, credit card companies, hospitals, medical clinics and security agencies to spread the concept further.

The news generated heated response among privacy advocates, financial analysts and security experts. "Promoting implanted RFID devices as a security measure is downright loco," said privacy advocate Katherine Albrecht, founder and director of Consumers Against Supermarket Privacy Invasion and Numbering (Caspian). Albrecht argued in a prepared statement that the announcement was a political maneuver by the Mexican authorities that would not help promote personal security in any way.

Still, security experts said last week that the move could be a precursor to a much larger trend toward "chipping" of humans over the next 20 years.

"In a decade or two, there will be a commonly available system with the ability to know who people are, where they are and what they've done," said John L. Peterson, a futurist and security expert with the Arlington Institute (Washington), and a former member of the National Security Council staff. "It's inevitable that something like this will happen. With terrorism, the external pressures are too great for it not to happen."

Beyond security
Indeed, it was the threat of security breaches that prompted Mexican officials to use the technology in the first place. Attorney General Rafael Macedo de la Concha told reporters earlier this month that 160 employees of his office were using the implanted chips as a means to enter and exit secure government facilities in Mexico City.

Antonio Aceves, general director of Solusat Corp. (Mexico City), the distributor that sold the chips to the Mexican government, acknowledged that chips had been implanted, but said he had signed a nondisclosure agreement barring any further discussion of the details. "We can say only that the attorney general and 160 employees have VeriChips in their bodies," Aceves told EE Times. Other, unverified news reports said that members of the Mexican military and police, as well as employees in the office of President Vincente Fox, might also be "chipped" in the next few months. Executives at Applied Digital Solutions said Mexico's use of the chip could be the tip of a very large technological iceberg. The VeriChip Division, which has struggled over the past two years and had annual revenue of just $550,000 in 2003, is working at getting the chip accepted by regulatory agencies, doctors and hospitals, as well as banks, credit card companies, security agencies and even gun manufacturers.

A capsule-like RFID device first used in animals, the VeriChip is small enough, at 11 x 2 mm, to be injected through a syringe and implanted in a variety of locations within the human body. It includes a memory that holds 128 characters of identification information, an electromagnetic coil for transmitting data and a tuning capacitor, all encapsulated in a silicone-and-glass enclosure. The passive RF unit, which operates at 125 kHz, is activated by moving a company-designed scanner a few inches from the chip. Doing so excites the coil and "wakes up" the chip, enabling it to transmit data.

Applied Digital, which sells 3 million to 4 million chips into the animal market annually, sold only about 7,000 VeriChips for human applications last year. Still, the company continues to advance its technology, apparently in expectation of a larger market eventually opening up.

Applied Digital is working on doubling the device's memory size to 256 characters and is developing read/write capabilities for it, said Peter Zhou, vice president and chief technology scientist. The read/write capabilities would open up another broad swath of potential applications, he said, particularly in the health care market, where the chip could be used to carry continuously updated medical information.

"We believe that medical applications will be the primary source for getting the chip into society," said Scott Silverman, chairman and CEO of Applied Digital Solutions. "After that, people will be able to use the chip to do other applications as well."

The cylindrical device could soon be endowed with biometric sensors that would allow it to read temperature or glucose levels inside the body. The tiny glucose monitor would employ enzymes that react by producing a voltage proportional to glucose levels. Zhou said the company already makes the temperature sensor available to the animal market. He said the glucose monitor is being tested, but warned that neither has been approved for human use.

The company also said it is working on new antenna structures that would stretch the unit's sensing distance from a few inches to a few feet.

CEO Silverman believes the strongest driving force behind the technology may be the simple need for a device that can "speak" for patients. Used in conjunction with implantable pacemakers and defibrillators, as well as artificial hips and knees, the device could provide medical personnel with information the patient would be unlikely to know. It could contain, for example, data on the manufacturer of an implant, its serial number, recall information, who installed it, where it was installed and the date of its last battery charge.

"Information-gathering techniques in emergency rooms are archaic today," Silverman said. "This is a device that can do the talking for an incapacitated patient."

Scan my arm
Applied Digital has also talked at length with banks and credit card companies about using the technology as a secondary form of authentication to help prevent credit card fraud, executives said last week. Under the company's plan, retailers would scan a chip in the customer's arm to authenticate identity.

"The banks and credit card companies we've talked to are extremely concerned about identity theft," Silverman said. "This would be one way for them to know that you are who you say you are." The company said it has also talked with a South Carolina-based small-arms manufacturer about the possibility of using the technology in handguns for law enforcement agents. In such applications, a modified scanner in the gun handle would work in conjunction with an identification chip embedded in the palm of a police officer's hand. If the scanner identified the officer, the gun could be fired. If no positive ID were made, the gun wouldn't work.

Applied Digital executives say that security applications, like those in the Mexican government, could also kick-start the technology's rise. Initial targets include federal buildings, power plants, military bases and prisons.

To address personal-security issues, company researchers have also recently completed an implantable prototype unit that combines global-positioning satellite technology with a cell phone, identification chip and a battery. The unit employs GPS as a locator, then uses the cell phone to transmit a signal. The device, which measures 1.25 x 0.5 inch, could be surgically inserted beneath a user's collarbone.

Applied Digital executives believe the GPS-based technology would be especially appropriate in locales like Central and South America, where kidnappings are reportedly reaching epidemic proportions. Authorities in those areas, in an apparent attempt to stem the problem, are increasingly considering RFID solutions.

"In Mexico, we have more than 150,000 missing kids," said Aceves of Solusat. "When you're looking at so much kidnapping, privacy concerns become less important."

Privacy advocates, however, predict that the use of RFID will backfire, with grotesque consequences. "When someone steals a car, the first thing they do is disarm the locator device," said Albrecht of Caspian. "So who's to say that a kidnapper won't want to disarm a locator device? The idea of a kidnapper probing underneath the collarbone is frightening."

Indeed, news reports suggest that such a scenario may already be occurring. Mexican authorities are said to have recently broken up a ring of kidnappers, known as "Los Chips," who searched their victims to see if they were carrying chips that could help them to be located.

Industry analysts said last week that they don't expect the sale of implantable chips for humans to take off any time soon. Animal-tracking systems, which have grown into a business that is estimated at more than $70 million per year, are set for more growth in the wake of mad-cow disease scares. But consumers, not surprisingly, have resisted the idea of having chips implanted in their own bodies.

"If people don't want RFID tags in their underwear or in their designer clothes, why would they ever want them under their skin?" said Mike Liard, an RFID analyst for Venture Development Corp. (Natick, Mass.).

Still, security experts believe that over the next decade, chips for humans, or some variation thereof, will emerge as a market. The looming threat of terrorism and the advent of such diseases as SARS will spark a demand for tracking and identification technologies. "The technology will insidiously insert itself into the system, first in smaller ways, then in larger ways, until people get used to it," said Peterson of the Arlington Institute. "Then it will become a common and easy way to establish identity."

Terror-related issues will likely push the technology to the forefront more quickly than would otherwise happen, Peterson added. "If a nuclear weapon goes off in some major city, there will be extraordinary pressure to figure out ways to keep it from happening again."

Indeed, "RFID chips in humans are still a long way off and no one really knows what will happen in that market," said Erik Michielsen, director of RFID and ubiquitous networks for Allied Business Intelligence Inc. (Oyster Bay, N.Y.). "But you can never say never."


43 posted on 06/02/2006 7:07:26 AM PDT by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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GLOBAL VERICHIP SUBSCRIBER (GVS) REGISTRY READY FOR FIRST-EVER VERICHIP "CHIPPING" PROCEDURE ON MAY 10TH AND LAUNCH OF VERICHIP INTO U.S. MARKET

Secure database and 24/7 operations center will support VeriChip subscribers, affiliates and authorized centers.

PALM BEACH, FL �May 2, 2002 -- Applied Digital Solutions, Inc. (Nasdaq: ADSX), an advanced technology development company, announced today that its Global VeriChip Subscriber (GVS) Registry service is ready for the first-ever VeriChip "chipping" procedure on May 10, 2002 and VeriChip's official market launch in the United States.

The GVS Registry service, first announced April 9, 2002, supports VeriChip subscribers, authorized VeriChip centers and VeriChip System Affiliates (such as hospitals, EMTs, search and rescue units, and urgent care clinics) by providing immediate access to vital subscriber information in an emergency.

Full-scale marketplace operation of the GVS Registry service will begin with the historic Jacobs family "chipping" procedure on May 10, 2002. The procedure will be followed by a press conference and an invitation-only brunch for business partners and community leaders.

During the press conference and the business brunch, Applied Digital executives will unveil more details about VeriChip's rollout plans.

VeriChip is a miniaturized, implantable, radio frequency identification device (RFID) that can be used in a variety of security, emergency and healthcare applications. About the size of a grain of rice, each VeriChip is composed of FDA-accepted materials and contains a unique verification number that can seamlessly integrate to the GVS Registry via a proprietary VeriChip scanner. Instant access to such vital information as allergies to medications, medical device implants, pre-existing medical conditions and emergency contact numbers could save lives in an emergency and enhance the peace of mind of subscribers and their loved ones.

The new GVS Registry Service is hosted and maintained by Digital Angel Corporation's (Amex: DOC) state-of-the-art, FDA-compliant operations centers in Riverside, California and Owings, Maryland. Complementary, 24/7 call-center services are provided by a physician-supervised staff of support associates in Owings, Maryland.

The GVS Registry service will initially support VeriChip subscribers in South Florida who will be "chipped" during the company's initial product rollout beginning with the Jacobs family on May 10, 2002.

Performed under the supervision of the company's first Authorized VeriChip Center in Palm Beach County, the rollout will feature the use of the first ChipMobile� � a state of the art, medically equipped mobile unit that will deliver VeriChip to initial target markets such as elder care centers, critical care facilities and Generation Y events. The Palm Beach County rollout will last until June 30, 2002, at which time the company expects to move into other geographic markets and initiate nationwide distributor alliance programs.

Commenting on this announcement, Scott R. Silverman, President of Applied Digital Solutions, said: "As promised, the GVS Registry is now fully operational and is prepared to securely house subscriber information so it can be accessed by Authorized VeriChip Affiliates such as hospitals and EMS units. We're confident the GVS Registry's secure software and database will integrate seamlessly with the VeriChip product and proprietary scanners to provide our subscribers with instant access to potentially life-saving, accurate, complete emergency healthcare information stored in the Registry."

About VeriChip� VeriChip, first announced on December 19, 2001, is a miniaturized, implantable, radio frequency identification device (RFID) that can be used in a variety of security, emergency and healthcare applications.

On April 4, 2002, the company announced that it had received written guidance that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not consider VeriChip's personal verification device to be a regulated medical device, enabling the company to begin sales, marketing and distribution of VeriChip in the United States. About the size of a grain of rice, each VeriChip is composed of FDA-accepted materials and contains a unique verification number. That number is captured by briefly passing a proprietary, external scanner over the VeriChip. A small amount of radio frequency energy passes through the skin energizing the dormant VeriChip, which then emits a radio frequency signal transmitting the verification number. The company believes its first-mover advantage will enable it to gain significant market share in the emergency information and verification market that is estimated to exceed $15 billion. VeriChip Corporation is a wholly owned subsidiary of Applied Digital Solutions.

About Digital Angel Corporation Digital Angel Corporation (Amex: DOC) was formed on March 27, 2002, in a merger between Digital Angel Corporation and Medical Advisory Systems, a global leader in telemedicine that has operated a 24/7, physician-staffed call center in Owings, Maryland, for two decades.

Prior to the merger, Digital Angel Corporation was a wholly owned subsidiary of Applied Digital Solutions. Applied Digital Solutions is the beneficial owner of 19.6 million shares of Digital Angel Corporation. Digital Angel� technology represents the first-ever combination of advanced biosensors and Web-enabled wireless telecommunications linked to the Global Positioning System (GPS). By utilizing advanced biosensor capabilities, Digital Angel will be able to monitor key body functions � such as temperature and pulse � and transmit that data, along with accurate emergency location information, to a ground station or monitoring facility. For more information about Digital Angel, visit www.digitalangel.net.

About Applied Digital Solutions Applied Digital Solutions (Nasdaq: ADSX) is an advanced technology development company that focuses on a range of early warning alert, miniaturized power sources and security monitoring systems combined with the comprehensive data management services required to support them. Through its Advanced Technology Group, the company specializes in security-related data collection, value-added data intelligence and complex data delivery systems for a wide variety of end users including commercial operations, government agencies and consumers.

For more information, visit the company's website at http://www.adsx.com.

Statements about the Company's future expectations, including future revenues and earnings, and all other statements in this press release other than historical facts are "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and as that term is defined in the Private Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties and are subject to change at any time, and the Company's actual results could differ materially from expected results. The Company undertakes no obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect subsequently occurring events or circumstances.

Investor Contact---------------------------Media Contact Lynn Anderson-------------------------Matthew Cossolotto Phone: 561-805-8007------------------Phone: 914-245-9721

44 posted on 06/02/2006 7:10:06 AM PDT by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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To: Crispus Attucks Patriot

>>>>This is precisely why the Founding Fathers gave us the Second Amendment

This is a big worry too.



Chip implanted in cop's hand would allow only officer to fire the gun

Note from infowars.com: Remember, you heard it here first. When Alex interviewed Baja Beach Club director Conrad Chase about their chip implant PR push to implant all of their VIP customers Chase provided Alex and his listeners some inside info straight from VeriChip. He not only told Alex about the gun/chip implant technology described in the AP article below, but also told him that the CEO of VeriChip, Mr. Bolton, had told him that there was a plan to use the VeriChip as a global implantable identity system.

He also told Alex that that the VeriChip company had told him that the Italian government was preparing to implant all of their government workers. (MY NOTE: VeriChip is moving the chipping multi level marketing style. Mexico is ALREADY force chipping government workers)

Since the implant/gun information Chase provided proved to be true, we must all be very concerned about the expansion of the Beast System as outlined by Chase and VeriChip.

Related Article: Baja Beach Club in Barcelona, Spain Launches Microchip Implantation for VIP Members
By JILL BARTON
Associated Press

April 13, 2004, 4:54 PM EDT

PALM BEACH -- A new computer chip promises to keep police guns from firing if they fall into the wrong hands.

The tiny chip would be implanted in a police officer's hand and would match up with a scanning device inside a handgun. If the officer and gun match, a digital signal unlocks the trigger so it can be fired. But if a child or criminal would get hold of the gun, it would be useless.

The technology is the latest attempt to create a so-called ``smart gun'' and could be marketed to law enforcement agencies within a year, according to Verichip Corp., which has created the microchip.

Verichip president Keith Bolton said that the technology could also improve safety for the military and individual gun owners.

``If you let your mind wander to other potential uses, you can imagine the lives that could be saved,'' he said.

Verichip, which has marketed similar microchips for security and medical purposes, announced Tuesday a partnership with gun maker FN Manufacturing to produce the smart weapons. The companies have developed a prototype and are working to refine its accuracy, Bolton said.

Similar developments are under way at other gun manufacturers and research firms. The New Jersey Institute of Technology and Australian gun maker Metal Storm Ltd. are working on a prototype smart gun that would recognize its owner's individual grip.

``We're at an interesting age where all sorts of science fiction is becoming real technology,'' said Donald Sebastian, NJIT vice president for research and development and director of the project.

The technology could also eventually have an even bigger impact on the illegal gun trade, Sebastian said.

The FBI estimated that 67 percent of the 16,204 murders in 2002 were committed with firearms.

``You have a long-term benefit of making it much more difficult for a handgun to have any value to anyone other than the original owner,'' Sebastian said.

But until the smart-gun technology is repeatedly proved to be reliable, some law enforcement authorities remain leery.

The scanning device could malfunction, the officer's hand with the computer chip could be smashed during a fight or an officer might need to use a partner's gun, said West Palm Beach police training Sgt. William Sandman.

``We have power outages, computers crash. Would you risk your life knowing all those things that could go wrong?'' Sandman said.

Verichip's Bolton said those concerns already are being addressed. He said the guns can be designed to work for an officer, his partner and a supervisor. Departments could set routines where the scanning devices in guns could be checked before every shift.

The chip needs no battery or power source. It works much like those that have been implanted in pets over the past decade so they can be identified if they get lost. Verichip, a subsidiary of the Palm Beach-based technology firm Applied Digital Solutions, developed a ``more intelligent'' version two years ago for humans and estimates that about 900 people worldwide have been implanted with them.

The chips can be used instead of security key cards at office buildings or to use global positioning satellites to keep track of a relative who might suffer from Alzheimer's. It can store medical information that emergency rooms could read or financial and identification information to prevent fraud.

The chip, about the size of a grain of rice, is inserted into an arm or hand with a syringe _ much like a shot is given.

Bolton said the company has seen no medical complications and that the technology will only improve with time.

Once the technology is accepted, legislation could follow to encourage the use of smart guns. New Jersey already has passed legislation that will require smart gun technology on all handguns sold _ three years after the state attorney general certifies that smart guns are available in the marketplace.

The National Rifle Association opposes the legislation because of potential problems with smart-gun technology, but gun safety advocates argue that the technology could encourage gun ownership with the newfound sense of security.

``It seems that guns are the only product that haven't followed a path of development that leads to greater safety for the user. The only real change we've seen is to make them more lethal and smaller so they can be more easily concealed,'' said Rob Wilcox, a spokesman for the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence. ``This is one of the steps that hasn't been taken and we think this debate is one that needs to take place.'' ___

On the Net:

Applied Digital Solutions: http://www.adsx.com

FN Manufacturing: http://www.fnmfg.com/

New Jersey Institute of Technology: http://www.njit.edu/

Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence: http://www.bradycenter.org/

National Rifle Association: http://www.nra.org/


45 posted on 06/02/2006 7:12:13 AM PDT by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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To: varyouga
"I'm pretty sure back-alley surgeons will start removing these tags from illegals as soon as they are introduced. Plus, RFID only works relatively short distances from the scanner so it is only useful for access purposes and not as a beacon. It will only inconvenience legal visitors.

There's lots of different sorts of RFIDs. I wouldn't think these would be implanted. More like a bracelet or anklet with a bigger battery and longer range. Add to that an "electronic seal" so that if it is removed, it automatically "calls for help". That way, you catch the "about to become" illegal, and anyone who is helping him/her.

It's not perfect---just another tool.

46 posted on 06/02/2006 7:14:26 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
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To: Americanexpat
"..plant them things in immigrants and illegals, then tomorrow they will plant them in everyone under saying it is for our own good. Hitler, Stalin and Mao would be proud."

Oh, stop with the hyperbole, already. There IS a difference between non-resident aliens and citizens. The time to start getting upset is when they propose to implant citizens and permanent residents. We can begin the revolt at that point.

47 posted on 06/02/2006 7:18:58 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog (The Hog of Steel-NRA)
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Of Interest:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1596116/posts
New Medical Trend Has People Getting Checked Out Electronically and Not In Person

This is an option being explored with VeriChip. Telemedicine is being introduced without the Microchip option being presented up front. But here is the behind the scenes presentation.

http://www.simson.net/ref/2004/csci_e-170/handouts/final/sanj1.ppt



http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1578091/posts
Identity Tags Implanted Under Workers' Skin


http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1549425/posts
German Proposes Tagging Islamic Militants


(not implanted...but introducing)
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1339911/posts
Parents Protest School Mandate That Students Wear Radio ID Tags


http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1563271/posts
Healthy People 2010


48 posted on 06/02/2006 7:33:12 AM PDT by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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To: Wonder Warthog
DNA.... In 5 years identification will be 100% accurate and instant. I suppose I can think of a dozen different things people might do, to try and fool the test, blood dope with someone elses DNA? plant someone elses cheak cells, but I think DNA will be the answer ultimately, maybe a thumbprint + DNA + Iris Scan And it goes without saying all of this would be more effective with an aggressive racial profiling protocol. Travel being what it is, there needs to be a unified global system. Scary to some, but inevitable yah? I'm authoritarian, I like all this stuff. (Not a popular sentiment around here)

But I wannna catch all the scumbags, let God and Barney Fife sort 'em out. The RFID chip would be good if it could be injected deep into the brain where it couldn't be removed. (kidding) NOT!

-I- would issue Fife all 6 bullets... :-)


49 posted on 06/02/2006 7:36:25 AM PDT by Capn TrVth
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To: Grinder; freepatriot32; prairiebreeze; tiamat; Ladysmith; Alas Babylon!; Malacoda; vrwc0915; ...

I still think NAIS is the equivalent of Animal Trials.


50 posted on 06/02/2006 7:38:10 AM PDT by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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