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US Cracks Europe GPS Satellite Codes
United Press International ^ | Jul 11, 2006

Posted on 07/13/2006 8:19:37 AM PDT by Magnum44

US Cracks Europe GPS Satellite Codes

Brussels (UPI) Jul 11, 2006

U.S. scientists have reportedly cracked the European Union's secret satellite navigation codes. The codes, to be used by the EU's Galileo satellite system, casts doubt the $4.2 billion project will pay for itself through commercial fees, The London Telegraph reported Tuesday. Cornell University Professor Mark Psiaki said he and colleagues cracked the coded data being beamed to Earth by a prototype orbiting satellite.

That, The Telegraph said, is potentially devastating for the EU, which wants to charge high-tech firms license fees to access that data, before they can make and sell compatible navigation devices to the public.

Galileo is to be a European rival to the United States' military-controlled GPS system, which supplies signals without charge. Galileo's designers, however, say it will be more accurate than GPS.

The European Commission said Monday Cornell's success in cracking codes for the prototype is irrelevant, since the final Galileo codes will be different.

Galileo, due to be operational by 2010, is a joint venture of the European Commission, the European Space Agency and private investors, including an arm of the Chinese government.

Source: United Press International


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events; Technical
KEYWORDS: china; gps; navigation; prc; targeting
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The EU wants to market higher accuracy navigation signals that only "authorized" users can get from GPS. The fact that the codes can be cracked is pretty significant. GPS, in its present state can be jammed, but the jammer becomes a target, and a user knows that his receiver is being jammed. Being able to hack the code in Galileo means it can be mislead, deceived. Not something you would want to rely on for military systems, of anything where safety is concerned.
1 posted on 07/13/2006 8:19:39 AM PDT by Magnum44
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To: Magnum44

Maybe the NYT should publish the codes.


2 posted on 07/13/2006 8:22:03 AM PDT by Peach (Prayers for our dear friends in Israel.)
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To: Magnum44
I wonder, could someone triangulate the EU and the US GPS systems to gain higher precision on their location?
3 posted on 07/13/2006 8:22:26 AM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: Magnum44

More accurate than US Military GPS? Sure it is.

Another govt sponsored EU boondoggle. Some people never learn.


4 posted on 07/13/2006 8:23:11 AM PDT by Seruzawa (If you agree with the French raise your hand - If you are French raise both hands.)
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To: Magnum44

Thanks, UPI, for revealing what I am sure is Top Secret intelligence.


5 posted on 07/13/2006 8:23:36 AM PDT by theDentist (Qwerty ergo typo : I type, therefore I misspelll.)
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To: Magnum44

So with a bit of (re)programming we could make all missiles that use the EU system head to Tehran or Peking or ...? Sweet.


6 posted on 07/13/2006 8:24:03 AM PDT by Semper Vigilantis (Illegal Immigration will dry up the day after the welfare programs do.)
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To: Magnum44

My understanding is that our GPS purposely does not give totally accurate data...for military reasons. If youi notice your GPS in your car is accurate to about 10 to 20 or 30 feet it seems. Our military does have accurate data.


7 posted on 07/13/2006 8:24:12 AM PDT by nikos1121 (Thank you again Jimmy Carter.)
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To: nikos1121

Thats correct. You have to have a precise code receiver and be an authorized user to get the higher accuracy.


8 posted on 07/13/2006 8:25:49 AM PDT by Magnum44 (Terrorism is a disease, precise application of superior force is the ONLY cure)
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To: Peach

Thats funny, actually. LOL.


9 posted on 07/13/2006 8:27:31 AM PDT by Magnum44 (Terrorism is a disease, precise application of superior force is the ONLY cure)
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To: Magnum44

:-)


10 posted on 07/13/2006 8:28:14 AM PDT by Peach (Prayers for our dear friends in Israel.)
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To: Magnum44
The European Commission said Monday Cornell's success in cracking codes for the prototype is irrelevant, since the final Galileo codes will be different.

Somewhere in America is a 14 year old pimple factory on a Linux box waiting for his 15 minutes of fame.

11 posted on 07/13/2006 8:31:34 AM PDT by MarineBrat (Muslims - The "flesh eating bacteria" version of humans.)
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To: Peach

And the TRUE DaVinci code. There, that takes care of the Italians.


12 posted on 07/13/2006 8:31:52 AM PDT by muleskinner
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To: nikos1121; Magnum44
My understanding is that our GPS purposely does not give totally accurate data...for military reasons. If youi notice your GPS in your car is accurate to about 10 to 20 or 30 feet it seems. Our military does have accurate data.

We used to degrade the unencrypted (open to all users) signals. That ended under clinton, iirc.

The Eurotwits can crow all they want about some marginally better degree of accuracy from their satnav. Irrelevent. DGPS (GPS plus ground stations that correct for signal error) beats any sat only system.
13 posted on 07/13/2006 8:32:33 AM PDT by A Balrog of Morgoth (With fire, sword, and stinging whip I drive the RINOs in terror before me.)
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To: Magnum44

Future advertisement: The EU GPS system. In use by terrorists worldwide since 2010.


14 posted on 07/13/2006 8:33:58 AM PDT by BigBobber
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To: A Balrog of Morgoth

We used to degrade the clocks for all non military users (it was called SA, or selective availability). We no longer do this, but that is different from the precise code signal for authorized users I referred to above.


15 posted on 07/13/2006 8:35:21 AM PDT by Magnum44 (Terrorism is a disease, precise application of superior force is the ONLY cure)
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To: taxcontrol
I wonder, could someone triangulate the EU and the US GPS systems to gain higher precision on their location?

That is a heck of a good idea.

But I don't think triangulation is quite the term that should be used. With two systems measuring the same location in 3D space it does seem logical that averaging the results in some manner should improve the overall accuracy. Just gotta be.

16 posted on 07/13/2006 8:35:46 AM PDT by InterceptPoint
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To: Magnum44
It reminds me of a friend of mine breaking the codes of satellite TV. It's quite possible, but it's not legal. Therefore, most customers will pay for the service to avoid legal hassles.
17 posted on 07/13/2006 8:35:57 AM PDT by george wythe
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To: Magnum44
I have a Magellan 700. Drove from the Germany (Ramstein area) to southwest England (Salisbury) without looking at a map once. Took me across Belgium, into France to the ferry port at Calais. Landed at Dover.

It will find restaurants by cuisine, hotels, parking garages, historical monuments, and most importantly Esso stations, where I can use gas coupons that allow me to pay US gas prices (in Germany and the Netherlands that is).

I am here to tell you that a GPS has saved my marriage.
18 posted on 07/13/2006 8:36:37 AM PDT by Gamecock ("God's sheep are brought home by the Holy Spirit, and there won't be one of them lost." L R Shelton)
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To: george wythe

The types of folks who want to crack these codes aren't concerned about legal services. They would want to cause disruption of service.


19 posted on 07/13/2006 8:37:24 AM PDT by Magnum44 (Terrorism is a disease, precise application of superior force is the ONLY cure)
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To: taxcontrol

Possible I guess, but satellites combined with fixed position terrestrial systems like WAAS does a better job. Remember, distance amplifies even tiny errors. So you put up a ground-based transmitter close to your area of operations and bang, accuracy jumps.

dung.


20 posted on 07/13/2006 8:41:21 AM PDT by Moose Dung (Perquacky is a fools game.)
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To: muleskinner

ROFL! And I hear there's a DaVinci diet -- I want that code too.


21 posted on 07/13/2006 8:41:36 AM PDT by Peach (Prayers for our dear friends in Israel.)
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To: Magnum44
We used to degrade the clocks for all non military users (it was called SA, or selective availability). We no longer do this, but that is different from the precise code signal for authorized users I referred to above.

Umm, I'm a QMC, so you can just sort of assume I know that stuff. :)
22 posted on 07/13/2006 8:46:26 AM PDT by A Balrog of Morgoth (With fire, sword, and stinging whip I drive the RINOs in terror before me.)
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To: Gamecock

Saved your marriage? Mine, too. Hah!

Have you named yours yet? Our Garmin 2720 is "Audrey"

dung.


23 posted on 07/13/2006 8:46:52 AM PDT by Moose Dung (Perquacky is a fools game.)
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To: Magnum44
The European Commission said Monday Cornell's success in cracking codes for the prototype is irrelevant, since the final Galileo codes will be different.

That inane statement is even funnier if you read it aloud with a disdainful French accent.

24 posted on 07/13/2006 8:48:40 AM PDT by dead (I've got my eye out for Mullah Omar.)
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To: A Balrog of Morgoth

I think that the improvement would stem from using more accurate atomic clocks.

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/534/1gen masers

See also my article on who invented GPS.

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/626/1


25 posted on 07/13/2006 8:49:05 AM PDT by Richard from IL
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To: Magnum44

Step two of this process, once the EU system is operational, will be for the eurotwits to ban the sale and possesion of the US models.


26 posted on 07/13/2006 8:50:35 AM PDT by TC Rider (The United States Constitution 1791. All Rights Reserved.)
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To: theDentist

It's not, it's open source code, that's the agreement, the EU taxes it by charging users for a key... Not part of the original agreement. The article is crap and is misleading.


27 posted on 07/13/2006 8:56:03 AM PDT by MD_Willington_1976
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To: Seruzawa

I seriously question the accuracy issue.

GPS can get you to within 1 cubic centimeter. Cubic, not square! You can determine where you are within ONE centimeter in THREE dimensions.

Sure... you can probably be more theoretically accurate, but what's the practical application?


28 posted on 07/13/2006 8:58:07 AM PDT by Terabitten (The only time you can have too much ammunition is when you're swimming.)
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To: Magnum44

http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/521790/?sc=rsla

Members of Cornell's Global Positioning System (GPS) Laboratory have cracked the so-called pseudo random number (PRN) codes of Europe's first global navigation satellite, despite efforts to keep the codes secret. That means free access for consumers who use navigation devices -- including handheld receivers and systems installed in vehicles -- that need PRNs to listen to satellites.

Because GPS satellites, which were put into orbit by the Department of Defense, are funded by U.S. taxpayers, the signal is free -- consumers need only purchase a receiver. Galileo, on the other hand, must make money to reimburse its investors -- presumably by charging a fee for PRN codes. Because Galileo and GPS will share frequency bandwidths, Europe and the United States signed an agreement whereby some of Galileo's PRN codes must be "open source." Nevertheless, after broadcasting its first signals on Jan. 12, 2006, none of GIOVE-A's codes had been made public.


They only broke the pseudo random number generator to allow the use of the open source Galileo PRN codes...


29 posted on 07/13/2006 8:59:40 AM PDT by MD_Willington_1976
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To: A Balrog of Morgoth

I realize I misread your original statement. Didn't mean to correct where it was not necessary.

FRegards,


30 posted on 07/13/2006 9:02:01 AM PDT by Magnum44 (Terrorism is a disease, precise application of superior force is the ONLY cure)
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To: Terabitten

You need DGPS to get cm accuracy. The basic open service is ~10 meters. The precise service is an order of mag better, and DGPS is an order of mag better still.


31 posted on 07/13/2006 9:05:25 AM PDT by Magnum44 (Terrorism is a disease, precise application of superior force is the ONLY cure)
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To: Magnum44
Being able to hack the code in Galileo means it can be mislead, deceived. Not something you would want to rely on for military systems, of anything where safety is concerned.

That doesn't make a lot of sense. The code that was cracked was on the reception side. It's not as if the hackers were able to tell the satellite to transmit bad information.

This is comparable to decrypting the subscription-only signal from a satellite TV service. The fact that you can now read the signal has no effect on what the legitimate subscribers see on their TV screen.

32 posted on 07/13/2006 9:05:56 AM PDT by whd23
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To: Magnum44
the final Galileo codes will be different.

Different, but as easily cracked.

33 posted on 07/13/2006 9:06:47 AM PDT by RightWhale (Repeal the law of the excluded middle)
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To: whd23

If you know the tracking code, you can replicate it and false data from a fake source, causing a receiver to be fooled into thinking its tracking a satellite when its tracking the fake transmitter. Result, a bogus nav solution that looks legit.


34 posted on 07/13/2006 9:07:59 AM PDT by Magnum44 (Terrorism is a disease, precise application of superior force is the ONLY cure)
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To: Magnum44

Like meaconing.


35 posted on 07/13/2006 9:10:31 AM PDT by ops33 (Retired USAF Senior Master Sergeant)
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To: Magnum44

I stand corrected. My points of reference were 1) using GPS in the military to get 12 digit grids in 2 dimensions and 2) a Discovery channel feature on a bridge built in France in which they used GPS to build to a point in space above the river channel. They made the point several times that they were building towards a point in space that they'd calculated via GPS to within 1-cm accuracy. As I recall, they built it to within 3 inches of where they wanted to build it - pretty damn close for such a big project.


36 posted on 07/13/2006 9:37:38 AM PDT by Terabitten (The only time you can have too much ammunition is when you're swimming.)
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To: whd23

The thing is no one wants to send out false DirecTV signals. But ending out false GPS signals is a lot more of a resonable problem.


37 posted on 07/13/2006 9:42:05 AM PDT by Bogey78O (<thinking of new tagline>)
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To: Magnum44
Was this something the US govt. wanted published on a rag?? The UPI is no better than those traitorous bastardS at the NYSLIMES!!
38 posted on 07/13/2006 9:58:00 AM PDT by RoseofTexas
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To: Terabitten
Sure... you can probably be more theoretically accurate, but what's the practical application?

Space based orbital mind control lasers, targeting specific neuron clusters in the brain.

39 posted on 07/13/2006 9:59:33 AM PDT by LexBaird ("Politically Correct" is the politically correct term for "F*cking Retarded". - Psycho Bunny)
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To: RoseofTexas

Dont think they cared. Those of us who are in this type of business have always thought the EU system was redundant at best, and never made sense from a business perspective. But the EU and its financiers did not ever care about that. They want to compete with the US system to show that they are not reliant upon us, and to have access to the precision solutions. I suppose there are those on the US/GPS side who would root for the failure of the EU system, because that would deny potential adversaries of a precision nav system (useful for guided bombs and missiles). Being able to crack it may be equally as good, because we can exploit anyone who relies on it.


40 posted on 07/13/2006 10:08:50 AM PDT by Magnum44 (Terrorism is a disease, precise application of superior force is the ONLY cure)
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To: Gamecock
I am here to tell you that a GPS has saved my marriage.

Was it one of those handheld units?

41 posted on 07/13/2006 10:10:23 AM PDT by palmer (Money problems do not come from a lack of money, but from living an excessive, unrealistic lifestyle)
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To: MD_Willington_1976
The PN sequences for US GPS is published for both the C/A and the encrypted channel. The encrypted PN sequence has a periodic repetition about every 2 weeks. The current state of that cycle is published on the C/A side. The difference is that the long period PN cycle used on the encrypted side is encrypted and runs at a rate 10X faster than the C/A side. GPS signals are below the noise floor. You must match the PN sequence of a local generator with the signal off the air and sum them to get the signal above the noise floor. If you don't have the crypto key, you can't decrypt and lock onto the PN sequence of the faster encrypted channel.
42 posted on 07/13/2006 10:12:26 AM PDT by Myrddin
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To: A Balrog of Morgoth
Umm, I'm a QMC, so you can just sort of assume I know that stuff. :)"

Then why do you need GPS???? Just whip out your sextant and HO229!!! Or you could buy this: Analog GPS

43 posted on 07/13/2006 10:31:58 AM PDT by jjm2111 (http://www.purveryors-of-truth.blogspot.com)
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To: jjm2111

Wow, I haven't touch one of those since youngster year at USNA. Memories....


44 posted on 07/13/2006 10:42:01 AM PDT by Magnum44 (Terrorism is a disease, precise application of superior force is the ONLY cure)
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To: nikos1121

That's just a cheap receiver, the ones sold for aircraft are accurate to within 20' at 600 knots, and thats at the very northern latitudes.

As far as the euroweines, let them get the new system in operation and our military can take off the accuracy blocking and bsnkrupt them.


45 posted on 07/13/2006 10:48:50 AM PDT by dalereed
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To: palmer
I am here to tell you that a GPS has saved my marriage.

Was it one of those handheld units?

Digit-all sex?

46 posted on 07/13/2006 10:55:36 AM PDT by USS Alaska (Nuke the terrorist savages - In Honor of Standing Wolf)
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To: USS Alaska

"I am here to tell you that a GPS has saved my marriage."


I think he means about driving without asking for directions..


47 posted on 07/13/2006 11:04:26 AM PDT by nikos1121 (Thank you again Jimmy Carter.)
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To: USS Alaska

"I am here to tell you that a GPS has saved my marriage."


I think he means about driving without asking for directions..


48 posted on 07/13/2006 11:04:31 AM PDT by nikos1121 (Thank you again Jimmy Carter.)
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To: Peach

L O L


49 posted on 07/13/2006 11:05:44 AM PDT by Constitution Day (HeadOn.ApplyDirectlyToTheForehead.HeadOn.ApplyDirectlyToTheForehead.HeadOn.)
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To: InterceptPoint; taxcontrol

Short story is that the variance (~square of the standard deviation) of independent measurements goes like resistors in parallel, hence this formula for combined error:

Combined_Error = sqrt(Error_1*Error_2/(Error_1+Error_2))

If both systems have the same standard error, you reduce the standard error by a factor or 0.707 (sqrt(.5)). Try it. If one error is much greater than the other, the reduction is much smaller, in the limit no effective reduction in error than simply taking the system with lower standard error. While four satellites are sufficient for a solution it is not uncommon for receivers to combine up to six satellites in a least squares solution.

In practice little is gained by using more than four satellites, since GPS error is dominated by geometry, the "DOP", dilution of precision, (a misnomer) depends more on the viewing geometry, how the errors in delay from separate satellites combine geometrically. Recievers using the best four GPS satellites perform about as well as those using six. Some receivers say they "track" upto 12 satellites, but this is at best the capacity for code tracking. More than eight satellites are rarely in view at once, and more satellites from the same constellation don't really buy you much.



50 posted on 07/13/2006 11:13:39 AM PDT by Lonesome in Massachussets (NYT Headline: 'Protocols of the Learned Elders of CBS: Fake But Accurate, Experts Say.')
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