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To: Halfmanhalfamazing
Upon further review, many posters are correct - this pic is not "doctored" or "photoshopped".

It's now obvious that the photographer screwed up his f-stop settings and the original main subject image, the vehicle, was underexposed due to back-lighting. He should have known better if a pro and opened up a couple stops OR used his EV compensation dial. But he didn't so it was done in the lab, washing out the blue. (its still funny hough, French & 'White' Flag)

A first year Photo student knows about the evils of back-lighting and light meter readings

[I have a Nikon camera, I love to take photographs, don't take my Kodachrome away]

45 posted on 08/28/2006 7:10:03 AM PDT by Condor51 (Better to fight for something than live for nothing - Gen. George S. Patton)
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To: Condor51
It's now obvious that the photographer screwed up his f-stop settings and the original main subject image, the vehicle, was underexposed due to back-lighting.

Or he may have had it properly exposed on a digital camera. Digital cameras' maximum value is much more defined than film. If the light blue (RGB = 133, 151, 193) got twice as much light as it should it would be RGB = 266, 302, 386. However, the pixels are limited to 255 so you get RGB = 255, 255, 255 or pure white. Film doesn't have such a sharp maximum, so it will still bluish.

Generally on digital cameras I underexpose the picture slightly because I can later brighten the picture to get it to look good. If it is overexposed then colors can be lost which cannot then be recovered by darkening the picture.

48 posted on 08/28/2006 7:26:27 AM PDT by KarlInOhio (UN Security Council resolution 1701: I believe it is ceasefire for our time.)
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