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Rescued Fishermen: 'Thank God For The U.S. Coast Guard'
msnbc ^ | 1:02 a.m. EDT September 26, 2006 | WCAU-TV

Posted on 09/26/2006 3:16:21 PM PDT by No2much3

INDIAN RIVER INLET, Del. - There was a happy reunion Monday night between seven wayward fishermen and their families. "We all survived," said one of them as he walked off a Coast Guard ship.

This group of union plumbers and sheet metal workers left Friday from the Indian River Inlet in Sussex County, Del., between Dewey Beach and Bethany Beach.

On Saturday night, they heard a bump under their boat, and then came the water.

"I heard the alarm for high water go off and ran down the steps, and water was already coming up the steps," said Ken Arters of Chester Springs. "We literally had no time."

(Excerpt) Read more at msnbc.msn.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events; US: Delaware
KEYWORDS: chestypuller; guadalcanal; gunnyg; marines; usmc; wwii
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first 1-5051-53 next last
This is my first time posting so I hope I did this right.
1 posted on 09/26/2006 3:16:23 PM PDT by No2much3
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To: No2much3

A+


2 posted on 09/26/2006 3:18:18 PM PDT by Justice
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To: No2much3

You did fine...welcome to the posting club.


3 posted on 09/26/2006 3:18:36 PM PDT by Dog
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To: No2much3
This is my first time posting so I hope I did this right.

You done did it right. Good job.

4 posted on 09/26/2006 3:19:49 PM PDT by AHerald ("Do not fear, only believe." Mk 5:36)
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To: No2much3
The men really still have no idea what pierced the bottom of the boat. They had about two minutes to get off the boat. They didn't even have a chance to grab any food.

My bet is that they sailed into the corner of a lost shipping container floating just below the surface.

5 posted on 09/26/2006 3:20:21 PM PDT by Gator101
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To: Gator101

MY guess is a stingray....I know, that's terrible!


6 posted on 09/26/2006 3:26:13 PM PDT by ladiesview61
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To: No2much3; 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

First Post! Ya done good!


7 posted on 09/26/2006 3:28:32 PM PDT by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: No2much3
Good job on the posting.....I have seen some of the rescues on TV the Coast Guard does.....wow boats, helicopters vs storms and high seas.....wow, hats off to the USCG....
8 posted on 09/26/2006 3:30:09 PM PDT by Kimmers
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To: No2much3

...."For a threeee hooour tooour, a threeee hooour tooour...."


9 posted on 09/26/2006 3:30:35 PM PDT by stm (Katherine Harris for US Senate!)
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To: ladiesview61

Well...you're not as bad as PETA! They practically wanted to give that stingray a medal.


10 posted on 09/26/2006 3:31:24 PM PDT by Gator101
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To: No2much3

Good job; glad to see you paid attention to the game first.


11 posted on 09/26/2006 3:33:15 PM PDT by SF Republican
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To: AHerald; No2much3; Dog

Well, he did forget to post pictures. Oh, union plumbers, never mind... I won't evvn make a crack about it... ;>)


12 posted on 09/26/2006 3:34:56 PM PDT by Ready4Freddy (Jim R really needs to add 'mooselimb' and 'blog' to the spellchecker! and 'spellchecker', too! ;>)
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To: Justice; Dog

Thank You!


13 posted on 09/26/2006 3:43:41 PM PDT by No2much3 (I did not ask for this user name, but I will keep it !)
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To: Ready4Freddy

14 posted on 09/26/2006 3:51:53 PM PDT by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: No2much3
Here's some help for your future posts J

HTML Help Threads & Other Info for Newbies
(And Anyone Else Who Needs It )




15 posted on 09/26/2006 3:54:02 PM PDT by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: Fiddlstix

LOL, thanks, Fiddlstix!


16 posted on 09/26/2006 3:54:12 PM PDT by Ready4Freddy (Jim R really needs to add 'mooselimb' and 'blog' to the spellchecker! and 'spellchecker', too! ;>)
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To: Ready4Freddy
You're welcome J
17 posted on 09/26/2006 3:56:22 PM PDT by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: Kimmers

"You gotta go out, you don't gotta come back"

Semper Paratus


18 posted on 09/26/2006 3:56:25 PM PDT by RinaseaofDs
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To: Fiddlstix

Seen that view many times in real X(h5a h3)...Semper Paratus...
CGAS Miami 68-72


19 posted on 09/26/2006 3:56:41 PM PDT by CGASMIA68
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To: Fiddlstix; Ready4Freddy

Thanks for the resource material. Posting pics is something I will have to learn.


20 posted on 09/26/2006 3:58:31 PM PDT by No2much3 (I did not ask for this user name, but I will keep it !)
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To: No2much3
Thanks for the resource material. Posting pics is something I will have to learn."

You're welcome J

Posting a Pic is easy. Here's how:

<img src="http://images.ibsys.com/2006/0925/9930436_320X240.jpg">

That's the code for the Pic I posted. Just copy/paste that above code and hit post. You'll see the Pic. It's pretty easy

21 posted on 09/26/2006 4:06:01 PM PDT by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: No2much3; OneLoyalAmerican; CedarDave; Coastie; Delta 21; weps4ret; sargunner; hedgetrimmer; ...

What is the United States Coast Guard?

The U.S. Coast Guard is one of five branches of the US Armed Forces, and falls under the jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The Coast Guard is the country's oldest continuous seagoing service with responsibilities including Search and Rescue (SAR), Maritime Law Enforcement (MLE), Aids to Navigation (ATON), Icebreaking, Environmental Protection, Port Security and Military Readiness.
In order to accomplish these missions the Coast Guard's 38,000 active-duty men and women,
8,000 Reservists, and 35,000 Auxiliarists serve in a variety of job fields ranging from
operation specialists and small-boat operators and maintenance specialists to electronic technicians and aviation mechanics.
The Coast Guard, during an average day, will:

Conduct 109 Search and Rescue Cases

Save 10 lives Assist 192 people in distress

Protect $2,791,841 in property

Launch 396 small boat missions

Launch 164 aircraft missions, logging 324 hours

Board 144 vessels

Seize 169 pounds of marijuana and 306 pounds of cocaine worth $9,589,000

Intercept 14 illegal migrants

Board 100 large vessels for port safety checks

Respond to 20 oil or hazardous chemical spills totaling 2,800 gallons

Service 135 aids to navigation






22 posted on 09/26/2006 4:18:20 PM PDT by 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub (SEMPER PARATUS -- ALWAYS READY!)
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

"'Thank God For The U.S. Coast Guard'"

DITTO THAT.


23 posted on 09/26/2006 4:20:38 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

And they have one of the most hazardous of missions.


24 posted on 09/26/2006 4:21:13 PM PDT by stm (Katherine Harris for US Senate!)
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

Bravo Zulu


25 posted on 09/26/2006 4:22:57 PM PDT by CWOJackson
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

thanks for the ping 68; Coast Guard, Navy, eagles up!


26 posted on 09/26/2006 4:44:35 PM PDT by groanup (Did you know there are actually Freepers who defend the IRS?)
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

Good work Coast Guard.


27 posted on 09/26/2006 4:44:49 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (The Internet is the samizdat of liberty..)
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

I echo that: "Thank God for the Coast Guard".

Especially since I can't swim too well.


28 posted on 09/26/2006 4:53:44 PM PDT by Darksheare (The deer expired due to adult onset truck bumper.)
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To: Darksheare
Get out there and practice some!

. . . and, in the meantime, always WEAR a good PFD when you go anywhere near the water. Actually, that's good advice for anybody on the water, regardless of how good a swimmer they are. I'm WSI and BSA Lifeguard certified, but you can bet I have my PFD on whenever I am kayaking, or even when I'm just puttering around on my dad's fishing boat. Even my DOG has a PFD.

29 posted on 09/26/2006 5:13:30 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

USCG Bump! Thanks for your service, Tonk


30 posted on 09/26/2006 5:16:47 PM PDT by The Spirit Of Allegiance (Public Employees: Honor Your Oaths! Defend the Constitution from Enemies--Foreign and Domestic!)
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

The Coast Guard rocks. Thanks Mr. Tonkin!


31 posted on 09/26/2006 5:26:51 PM PDT by StarCMC ("So what was the price to betray us - Judas?" - SGT Mark Russak to Traitor Murtha)
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

BUMP for the U.S. Coast Guard.


32 posted on 09/26/2006 5:27:24 PM PDT by jazusamo (DIANA IREY for Congress, PA 12th District: Retire murtha.)
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To: Kimmers

the USCG - over 35,000 rescues in the aftermath of Katrina....they're the best....


33 posted on 09/26/2006 5:29:20 PM PDT by BamaDi (W - My hero!)
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To: t1b8zs

my mother was manager of the package store at aviation training center mobile until she retired in 1986....we are still close to a bunch of Coasties from those days....


34 posted on 09/26/2006 5:31:50 PM PDT by BamaDi (W - My hero!)
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To: No2much3

I usually go out of my way to find something to criticize if someone self-identifies themselves as a n00b. Yours is about as close to perfect as humanly possible. You should've capitalized MSNBC in the top link.


35 posted on 09/26/2006 5:33:08 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy

I don't think they rate capitalization.

JMO


36 posted on 09/26/2006 6:32:56 PM PDT by No2much3 (I did not ask for this user name, but I will keep it !)
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To: No2much3

I go for accuracy myself, and let words do the damage. To each his own.


37 posted on 09/26/2006 6:37:36 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: No2much3

Fine job posting.


And as far as that headline goes.........

I couldn't agree more!!


38 posted on 09/26/2006 7:02:19 PM PDT by proudmilitarymrs (It's not immigration, it's an invasion!)
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

Thank you.


39 posted on 09/26/2006 9:32:38 PM PDT by Alamo-Girl
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

The Coast Guard does a fantastic job at saving lives and under the worst conditions that mother nature can bring to bear.

I worked very close with our local folks when I was the Search and Rescue Coordinator. Most of my experience with them is when I called for their aircraft.

Where I live, they save lives all the time. I couldn't have more respect or admiration for these absolutely great folks.


40 posted on 09/26/2006 10:17:57 PM PDT by Gator113
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To: 68-69TonkinGulfYachtClub

BTTT


41 posted on 09/27/2006 3:03:59 AM PDT by E.G.C.
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To: Kimmers

I know a few former Coast Guardsmen who affectionately refer to the Coast Guard as the "Hooligan Navy." Great fellows... dedicated to their duty...


42 posted on 09/27/2006 3:09:12 AM PDT by Sir Francis Dashwood (LET'S ROLL!)
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To: AnAmericanMother

With a snorkel and swim mask, I'm a fish.
Take those away, I'm a rock...


43 posted on 09/27/2006 2:55:27 PM PDT by Darksheare (The deer expired due to adult onset truck bumper.)
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To: No2much3

Looks great to me! Keep it up!


44 posted on 09/27/2006 2:56:39 PM PDT by Xenalyte (Viva Espaņa!)
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To: No2much3

Speaking of the US Coast Guard!

~~~~~
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com/2003_10_21_gunnyg_archive.html

GLOBE and ANCHOR Weblog..... by Gunny G!
Tuesday, October 21, 2003

"MY APARTMENT" ...by Dick Gaines

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A few months ago, in the city of Rochester, NY, I stopped at a bar on Mount Read Blvd. near the old Kodak plant. The large Marine Corps emblem that adorned the bukhead outside had stopped me cold as I rounded a curve and came upon the old building and bar named "My Apartment." Another sign outside announced "Marine Corps Birthday Ball Every Year November 10th!"--or words to that effect.

Inside, the young man at the bar advised me that the bar had long been/and still was owned by an older former Marine--his name escapes me at the moment. The Marine had suffered a stroke a year or two prior to my visit, and except for Nov. 10th and New Years, seldom ever came into the bar anymore. The bulkheads were lined back-to-back with numerous old full-size Marine Corps recruiting posters and other memorabilia from days long gone by. There wasn't a bare spot anywhere in the place where something else 'Marine Corps' could have been hung--and the bartender remarked, "you should see all the stuff in the basement!" I spent considerable time examining the posters and photographs there.

Later, I inquired around elsewhere in Rochester among the few Marines I knew there, and I found that the proprietor of The Apartment was well-known to Marines in the area. He had owned another bar in town called "The California Brewhouse," and a couple others too.

One of the items on that wall that day that I noticed, was a Medal Of Honor citation for a coastguardsman on Guadalcanal in 1942. I remembered the story from years ago, but I haven't seen or heard of it lately. Great story, and here it is....

http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-cp/history/Munro.html

DOUGLAS MUNRO AT GUADALCANAL

by Dr. Robert M. Browning Jr.

The Coast Guard's first major participation in the Pacific war was at Guadalcanal. Here the service played a large part in the landings on the islands. So critical was their task that they were later involved in every major amphibious campaign during World War II. During the war, the Coast Guard manned over 350 ships and hundreds more amphibious type assault craft. It was in these ships and craft that the Coast Guard fulfilled one of its most important but least glamorous roles during the war--that is getting the men to the beaches. The initial landings were made on Guadalcanal in August 1942, and this hard-fought campaign lasted for nearly six months. Seven weeks after the initial landings, during a small engagement near the Matanikau River, Signalman First Class Douglas Albert Munro, died while rescuing a group of marines near the Matanikau River. Posthumously awarded a Medal of Honor, he lived up to the Coast Guard's motto--"Semper Paratus."

Douglas Munro grew up in the small town of Cle Elum, Washington. Enlisting in September 1939, Munro volunteered for duty on board the USCG cutter Spencer where he served until 1941. While on board he earned his Signalman 3rd Class rating. In June, President Roosevelt directed the Coast Guard to man four large transports and serve in mixed crews on board twenty-two naval ships. When word arrived that these ships needed signalmen, Munro, after much pleading with Spencer's executive officer, was given permission to transfer to the Hunter Liggett (APA-14). This 535 foot, 13,712 ton ship, was one of the largest transports in the Pacific. She carried nearly 700 officers and men and thirty-five landing boats including two LCTs. In April 1942, the "Lucky Liggett" sailed to Wellington, New Zealand, to prepare for a major campaign in the south pacific.

On 7 August 1942, the United States embarked on its first major amphibious assault of the Pacific War. After the successes at Coral Sea and Midway the United States decided to counter Japanese advances in the Solomon Islands. These islands form two parallel lines that run southeast approximately 600 miles east of New Guinea. Tulagi and Guadalcanal, both at the end of the chain were picked for an assault. Guadalcanal was strategically important because the Japanese were building an airfield, and if finished would interfere with the campaign.

Eighteen of the twenty-two naval troop carrying ships attached to the campaign's task force carried Coast Guard personnel. These men were assigned an integral part in the landings--the operation of the landing craft. Many of the Coast Guard coxswains had come from Life-Saving stations and their experience with small boats made them the most seasoned small boat handlers in government service.

The Coast Guard manned transports played a prominent role in the initial landings at Guadalcanal, Tulagi and other nearby islands. As the task force gathered, Munro, now a signalman first-class, was assigned to temporary duty on the staff of Commander, Transport Division Seventeen. During the preparations for the invasion, Munro was transferred from ship to ship, as his talents were needed. The task force rendezvoused at sea near the end of July and on 7 August the Liggett led the other transports to their anchorage off Guadalcanal. Hunter Liggett served as the amphibious force command post until the Marines secured the beaches.

At he time of the invasion, Munro was attached to the staff of Rear Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner on board McCawley (APA-4). Munro made the landing on Tulagi Island where fierce fighting lasted for several days. About two weeks later Munro was sent twenty miles across the channel to Guadalcanal where the Marines had landed and had driven inland. One of the bloodiest and most decisive battles ensued. The Americans quickly seized the airfield on the island but for six months both the U.S. and the Japanese poured troops onto Guadalcanal in an attempt to gain control and force the other off.

After the initial landings at Guadalcanal, Munro and twenty-four other Coast Guard and Navy personnel were assigned to Lunga Point Base. The base was commanded by Commander Dwight H. Dexter, USCG, who was in charge of all the small boat operations on Guadalcanal. The base, situated on the Lever Brothers coconut plantation consisted of a small house with a newly constructed coconut tree signal tower. Munro was assigned here because of his signalman rate. The base served as the staging area for troop movements along the coast. To facilitate this movement, a pool of landing craft from the numerous transports lay there to expedite the transportation of supplies and men.

A month into the campaign, the Marines on the island were reinforced and decided to push beyond their defensive perimeter. They planned to advance west across the Matanikau River to prevent smaller Japanese units from combining and striking American positions in overwhelming numbers. For several days near the end of September, the Marines tried to cross the river from the east and each time met tremendous resistance. On Sunday, 27 September, Marine Lieutenant Colonel Lewis B. "Chesty" Puller embarked three companies of his 7th Marines in landing craft. They planned to land west of the river, drive out the Japanese, and establish a patrol base on the west side of the Matanikau.

The landing craft were dispatched from Lunga Base. Douglas Munro, just two weeks short of his twenty-third birthday, took charge of ten LCPs and LCTs (tank lighters) to transport Puller's men from Lunga Point to a small cove west of Point Cruz. The Marines landed with the support of the destroyer U.S.S. Monssen which laid down a covering barrage with her five inch batteries shortly after twelve o'clock. Major Ortho L. Rodgers, commanding the landing party reached the beach in two waves at 1:00. The 500 unopposed Marines pushed inland and reorganized on a ridge about 500 yards from the beach. At about 1:50, approximately the same time they reached the ridge, their gunfire support was disrupted by a Japanese bombing raid. Monssen had to withdraw to avoid seventeen high level Japanese bombers. Unfortunately, this occurred at the same time that the Marines were struck by an overwhelming Japanese force west of the river. This situation deteriorated when Major Rodgers was killed and one of the company commanders was wounded.

After the Marines landed, Munro and the boats returned to Lunga Point Base. A single LCP remained behind to take off the immediate wounded. Coast Guard petty officer Ray Evans and Navy Coxswain Samuel B. Roberts manned the craft. They kept the craft extremely close to the beach to take off the wounded as quickly as possible. The Japanese, meanwhile had worked behind the Marines and without warning a machine gun burst hit the LCP parting the rudder cable and damaging the boat's controls. After jury rigging the rudder, Roberts was struck by enemy fire and Evans managed to jam the controls to full ahead and sped back to Lunga Point Base. Unable to stop, the LCP ran onto the beach at 20 mph. Roberts later died but won the Navy Cross posthumously.

As Evans arrived at the Lunga Point base, word arrived that the Marines were in trouble and were being driven back toward the beach. Their immediate plight had not been known. The bombing raid had driven Monssen out of range to visually communicate with shore. Furthermore, the three companies of Marines had failed to take a radio and were unable to convey their predicament. Using under-shirts they spelled out the word "HELP" on a ridge not far from the beach. Second Lieutenant Dale Leslie in a Douglas SBD spotted the message and passed it by radio to another Marine unit. At 4 P.M. Lt. Colonel Puller, realizing that his men were isolated, embarked on Monssen to direct personally the covering fire for the marines who were desperately trying to reach the beach.

The landing craft had meanwhile been readied at Lunga Point Base. Again, virtually the same boats that had put the Marines on the beach were assembled to extract them. Douglas Munro, who had taken charge of the original landing, volunteered to lead the boats back to the beach. None of these boats were heavily armed or well protected. For instance, Munro's Higgin's boat had a plywood hull, it was slow, vulnerable to small arms fire, and was armed only with two air-cooled .30 caliber Lewis machine guns.

As Munro led the boats ashore the Japanese fired on the small craft from Point Cruz, the ridges abandoned by the Marines, and from positions east of the beach. This intense fire from three strong interlocking positions disrupted the landing and caused a number of casualties among the virtually defenseless crews in the boats. Despite the intense fire Munro led the boats ashore. Reaching the shore in waves, Munro led them to the beach two or three at a time to pick up the Marines. Munro and Petty Officer Raymond Evans provided covering fire from an exposed position on the beach.

As the Marines reembarked, the Japanese pressed toward the beach making the withdrawal more dangerous with each second. The Monssen and Leslie's Douglas "Dauntless" dive bomber provided additional cover for the withdrawing Marines. The Marines arrived on the beach to embark on the landing craft while the Japanese kept up a murderous fire from the ridges about 500 yards from the beach. Munro, seeing the dangerous situation, maneuvered his boat between the enemy and those withdrawing to protect the remnants of the battalion. Successfully providing cover, all the Marines including twenty-five wounded managed to escape.

With all the Marines safely in the small craft, Munro and Evans steered their LCP off shore. As they passed towards Point Cruz they noticed an LCT full of Marines grounded on the beach. Munro steered his craft and directed another tank lighter to pull it off. Twenty minutes later, the craft was free and heading to sea. Before they could get far from shore, the Japanese set up a machine gun and began firing at the boats. Evans saw the fire and shouted a warning to Munro. The roar of the boat's engine, however, prevented Munro from hearing and a single bullet hit him in the base of the skull. Petty Officer Munro died before reaching the operating base, but due to his extraordinary heroism, outstanding leadership and gallantry, Munro posthumously received the Medal of Honor.

The Coast Guard continued to provide valuable service in all theaters of the war. The Coast Guard's motto "Semper Paratus" provided inspiration and guided other men to perform heroic acts demonstrating that they were indeed "Always Ready."

[Historians Office]

[USCG Home Page]
Added: September 1999

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
- posted by GunnyG @ Tuesday, October 21, 2003


45 posted on 09/27/2006 3:47:47 PM PDT by gunnyg
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To: Darksheare
Natural sinker, then. (I am too -- or at least I was one, 30 years and 30 pounds ago. Now I float nicely < g > )

Read Fred Lanoue's book Drownproofing. Fred (he was a friend of my grandfather's and taught my mom to swim) said he could get the worst natural sinker floating with his techniques.

46 posted on 09/27/2006 4:18:40 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: AnAmericanMother

I can float, only so long as I sit still.


47 posted on 09/27/2006 4:24:02 PM PDT by Darksheare (The deer expired due to adult onset truck bumper.)
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To: Darksheare
Yep, cause your lungs are full of air when you're floating & stationary. Once you start moving and breathing, your upper body and head are too heavy for your underwater buoyancy to support!

( . . . believe me, I know! Been there, sunk in bodies of water all over the continental U.S. and Caribbean!)

48 posted on 09/27/2006 4:29:19 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother ((Ministrix of Ye Chase, TTGC Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment)))
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To: No2much3

Semper Paratus!


49 posted on 12/04/2006 9:45:33 PM PST by pray4liberty (Coast Guard wife since 1983)
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To: Fiddlstix
This is a test to see if I followed your instructions correctly. This is only a test. If this had been a real posting, something important would be on it.
50 posted on 12/04/2006 10:15:15 PM PST by american_ranger
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