Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Abkhazia asks Russia to recognise its independence
eitb24 ^ | 10/18/2006

Posted on 10/18/2006 1:03:00 PM PDT by M. Espinola

Abkhazia broke away from Georgia after a war in 1992-93, but so far no nation has recognised it. Georgia, entangled in a row with Russia, accuses Moscow of backing Abkhaz separatists.

The parliament of Georgia's breakaway region of Abkhazia asked Russia on Wednesday to recognise its independence and openly adopt the role of the Black Sea province's patron.

Abkhazia broke away from Georgia after a war in 1992-93, but so far no nation has recognised it. Georgia, entangled in a row with Russia, accuses Moscow of backing Abkhaz separatists.

"The People's Assembly of the Republic of Abkhazia has decided to ask the Russian president and parliament to recognise Abkhazia's independence and establish relations of association between Russia and Abkhazia," the parliament said in a petition.

Moscow, irked by Georgia's pro-Western course and enraged by the brief detention of four Russian officers there last month, has slapped sanctions on Tbilisi, including a halt in transport links and pressure on Georgian businesses in Russia.

Sanctions

Accusations that the Caucasus state was planning to seize back Abkhazia by force were among official explanations given by Russian officials for the sanctions.

"Russia is the very country that can provide Abkhazia's security and safeguard its future," the RIA news agency quoted Abkhaz President Sergei Bagapsh as saying.

Moscow has never officially suggested it could recognise the independence of Abkhazia, where the majority of the population carry Russian passports.

But Russian officials have said that if the Serbian province of Kosovo is given independence, similar requests from Abkhazia, another breakaway Georgian region of South Ossetia and Moldova's separatist Transdniestria province could gain more legitimacy.

Developing diplomatic relations

Last month Russian President Vladimir Putin said the history of "frozen conflicts" on the territory of the former Soviet Union was no different from that of Kosovo, for which Western powers are backing independence.

On Wednesday, several high-profile Russian politicians said they supported a positive reaction to Abkhazia's request.

"We shouldn't wait for Kosovo, and start developing diplomatic relations with Abkhazia, South Ossetia and Transdniestria," the Interfax agency quoted a member of Russia's Duma legislature, Sergei Baburin, as saying.

Georgian officials were unavailable for comment.

A week ago, pro-Moscow Transdniestria appealed to other ex-Soviet states, including Russia, to recognise its independence. Russia has not so far reacted to the appeal.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Russia
KEYWORDS: abkhazia; caucasus; georgia; putin
Backgrounder: Georgia
1 posted on 10/18/2006 1:03:00 PM PDT by M. Espinola
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: M. Espinola
EU ministers warn Putin over Georgia


Georgians coming home from Russia. Welcome Home!!

2 posted on 10/18/2006 1:19:23 PM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MarMema
Top U.S. diplomat criticizes Russian pressure on Georgia

"I hope that Russia will think about some of the means it has imposed against Georgia and particularly against Georgians because of their nationality," U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Daniel Fried said at a news conference during a visit to the Georgian capital. "I find it recalls another era, a time better left behind."

"Fried also expressed concern about the death Tuesday of a Georgian man about to be deported from Russia. The Georgian Embassy said the man had been deprived of medical attention during five days of detention, before dying of an asthma attack. "This is not right," Fried said. "I hope this pressure ends soon. It should end soon. It serves no purpose."

3 posted on 10/18/2006 1:21:18 PM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: M. Espinola

Georgia stands to get whittled away and end up in a situation similar to Israel - surrounded by enemies with very little territory. Better hope they build wealth rapidly the was Israel did or else they'll be in a world of hurt.


4 posted on 10/18/2006 1:23:42 PM PDT by GOP_1900AD (Stomping on "PC," destroying the Left, and smoking out faux "conservatives" - Take Back The GOP!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MarMema
World Bank allocate USD 20 million for Georgia's reform process

"..Southworth also noted that the challenge for Georgia at the moment is to transform the early reform efforts into lasting institutional change in order to maintain high rates of economic growth and reduction of poverty."

I love the way our President has kept his word by continuing to stand with the Georgian people in their time of need.

5 posted on 10/18/2006 1:26:13 PM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: GOP_1900AD

Georgia's biggest problem is Putin attempting to expand his energy empire.


6 posted on 10/18/2006 1:27:45 PM PDT by M. Espinola (Freedom is not free)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: GOP_1900AD
What scares me the most for them is a "regime change" in this country. Right now the US is keeping them afloat.

They're going to have to learn to stand on their own two feet *and* get through the crisis with Abkhazia, which is going to be a huge one eventually.

7 posted on 10/18/2006 1:28:15 PM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: MarMema
Great links!

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Daniel Fried's comment relating to how Moscow is treating Georgians based on their race is well worth noting: "I find it recalls another era, a time better left behind."

Putin's despicable actions are a carbon copy of the early stages of Nazi Germany.

8 posted on 10/18/2006 1:32:39 PM PDT by M. Espinola (Freedom is not free)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: M. Espinola
I found them while looking for another news item I had seen earlier today, with Fried talking about Abkhazia. He seems very strong on keeping it with Georgia. I don't know - Russia is really escalating on this one.

Do you think we would support the Georgians with troops to keep Abkhazia? It doesn't seem worth it when the Abkhaz themselves, about 1/2 or more of the population (since they kicked out and killed so many Georgians) wants to be with Russia.

Anyway Fried is in Tbilisi. Lucky him.

9 posted on 10/18/2006 1:40:52 PM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: MarMema

A Georgian man is met by his mother and sister after his arrival at Tbilisi airport October 17th, 2006, after being deported from Russia. Rights activists on Tuesday said they had obtained a leaked order from a Russian city police chief instructing officers to single out Georgians illegally resident in Russia for deportation. REUTERS/David Mdzinarishvili (GEORGIA)

Russia says it is cracking down on illegal immigration but this Georgian man says his visa is valid. BBC

The raft of Moscow's punitive measures has not even spared schools. A Russian-run school in Tbilisi has put up signs saying Georgian children are no longer welcome. BBC

10 posted on 10/18/2006 1:46:18 PM PDT by M. Espinola (Freedom is not free)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: M. Espinola; Vargon
Gotsiridze celebrates French giant's move into Georgian banking sector

"One of the largest companies in the world's banking industry the French Societe Generale Group has stepped into the Georgian market after buying a 60 percent stake of Bank Republic-one of Georgia's top banks."

"Gotsiridze and Mattei also discussed the current economic situation in Georgia. Mattei said Georgia is the best country to invest in. "A very powerful investor has entered Georgia. I want to say that Societe Generale Group's assets are bigger than 1500 Russian banks put together," Gotsiridze said on Tuesday."

" Societe Generale serves more than 20 million individual customers worldwide and ranks among the leading banks in European capital markets and derivatives."

And the race is on to see if Georgia will survive.

Eat dust, Putin.

11 posted on 10/18/2006 2:08:37 PM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: M. Espinola
Putin's despicable actions are a carbon copy of the early stages of Nazi Germany.

There is a lot which reminds me of that time period. Wounded pride, nationalism, removal of rights...

Some Russian bloggers have made this point.

12 posted on 10/18/2006 2:18:43 PM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: MarMema
Putin is obviously instigating the tension in the Abkhazia area of Georgia. As in other areas of the Trans-Caucasus region the driving force behind Moscow's thirst for more power is energy; natural gas, crude oil or pipelines for both.

Oil has been an issue in the Caucasus for over 100 years

Battle of the Caucasus 1942-1943

The Caucasus and the Oil, The German-Soviet War in the Caucasus 1942/43

Operation Edelweiss: Nazi Germany's plan to gain control over the Caucasus and capture the oil fields of Baku

13 posted on 10/18/2006 2:40:49 PM PDT by M. Espinola (Freedom is not free)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: MarMema
"A very powerful investor has entered Georgia. I want to say that Societe Generale Group's assets are bigger than 1500 Russian banks put together," Gotsiridze said on Tuesday."

In additional to the energy issues this is another reason Putin is having a bird.

Georgia also needs to attempt attract more American, Canadian & other 'Western' banking & corporate interests countering the bear to the north.

Georgian links

Note this pipeline will travel through portions of southern Georgia (Source)

14 posted on 10/18/2006 3:01:07 PM PDT by M. Espinola (Freedom is not free)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: MarMema

with the help of Shamil Basayev, the Butcher of Beslan, Abkhaz nazi separatist murderers ethnically cleansed hundreds of thousands of Georgians from Abkhazia in 1992-1993. Now the Putinista Reich is following in their footsteps and those of Basayev, the animal Russia unleashed on Georgia. At Beslan Russia already suffered the blowback from supporting Basayev's jihad against Georgia, but they learned nothing. They refuse to repent and so they continue in willful sin. The wages of sin are death.


15 posted on 10/18/2006 4:44:04 PM PDT by Tailgunner Joe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Tailgunner Joe
the Putinista Reich

That's a good one.

16 posted on 10/18/2006 9:36:05 PM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Tailgunner Joe
The facts always merit reprinting.

"with the help of Shamil Basayev, the Butcher of Beslan, Abkhaz nazi separatist murderers ethnically cleansed hundreds of thousands of Georgians from Abkhazia in 1992-1993. Now the Putinista Reich is following in their footsteps and those of Basayev, the animal Russia unleashed on Georgia. At Beslan Russia already suffered the blowback from supporting Basayev's jihad against Georgia, but they learned nothing. They refuse to repent and so they continue in willful sin. The wages of sin are death."

Moscow's blame game continues.....Stalin would be proud.

Russia military chief of staff blames NATO for Russia-Georgia tensions

17 posted on 10/19/2006 1:37:37 AM PDT by M. Espinola (Freedom is not free)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Tailgunner Joe

Abkhaz nazi separatist murderers ethnically cleansed hundreds of thousands of Georgians from Abkhazia in 1992-1993. ==

Joe tell us please who started that war in 1992? Because the inncent watcher should know.


18 posted on 10/19/2006 2:47:39 AM PDT by RusIvan ("THINK!" the motto of IBM)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: MarMema

They're going to have to learn to stand on their own two feet *and* get through the crisis with Abkhazia, which is going to be a huge one eventually.==

They will not. Georgia during its history did NEVER stand on thier own feet. She always wanted to find some country which will be her sponsor-master. From 17 century till recently it was Russia.

Now they just changed the master: now it is USA. They will request the dole form USA in always increasing volume. No wonder the georgian population will grow. They will need more and more dole. Open up your wallet:)).

Learn history and you will find all the answers.

P.S. I'm sure that one day I will see the posters here on FR which say that it is all the cunning policy of Putin just to free Russia from those clients of her and put all burden on US shoulders:).


19 posted on 10/19/2006 2:56:12 AM PDT by RusIvan ("THINK!" the motto of IBM)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: RusIvan
Learn history and you will find all the answers.

You may want to do the same. Try Estonia for a start.
Estonia

"...party leader Mart Laar became premier. Laar is one of a small group of prominent politicians who have dominated Estonian politics through the series of coalition administrations, which have governed the country since independence."
"Laar is acknowledged as probably the most successful of these, taking much credit for guiding Estonia through major political and economic changes."

You may also want to review the last 80 years or so of history in your country.

20 posted on 10/19/2006 3:07:23 AM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: MarMema

Learn history and you will find all the answers.
You may want to do the same. Try Estonia for a start. ==

And what is in common between Estonia and Georgia? 2 small countries looked for the new master-sponsor and found it. First one found EU. Second one found USA.

You just pay attention to facts HOW Soviet Union was dissolved. You may find that it was Russia which proclaimed her independece from SU FISRT from 15 former republics.
Russia proclaimed her imdependence FIRST. Then she recognised the independences of other republic. Again she did it FIRSTEVER.

Until you realize such facts you understand nothing.


21 posted on 10/19/2006 3:23:02 AM PDT by RusIvan ("THINK!" the motto of IBM)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: MarMema
Talking about Maart, very bright person.

Estonia and Centesimus Annus: A Universal Message of Hope

22 posted on 10/19/2006 6:05:49 AM PDT by Lukasz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Lukasz
Yes. I like him too. Very much.

Mart Laar, 45, a former Estonian prime minister credited with turning around his country's fortunes after the collapse of the Soviet Union, has been working since May this year as a special adviser to Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili. Laar was hired for a year to coordinate economic reforms and offer wider transition advice.

Thank God he is helping Georgia today.

23 posted on 10/20/2006 3:02:52 AM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Lukasz; RusIvan; Tailgunner Joe
Don't Let Georgia Fall off the Map
By Mart Laar

Tallinn, Estonia -- Georgia only seems far away. For Europe, most countries are too easily dismissed as far away. This blindness got the Continent into more than one war, and could bring trouble again in the Caucasus. In the modern world, no one can survive in isolation, and Europe's future today depends on countries like Georgia that only look to be beyond the horizon.

A decade ago, my own country seemed far away, too. This spring, Estonia joins the European Union and NATO. Georgia also has a long European heritage. It was part of the Hellenistic world and Roman Empire before succumbing to Russian rule and then, after a brief spell of independence, Soviet conquest. Over the past dozen years of troubled independence, Georgia has been beset by civil war, political conflict, misery and corruption.

After last month's peaceful "rose revolution" forced out President Eduard Shevardnadze, Georgians this month enthusiastically elected a young, Western-educated lawyer as president. Mikhail Shaakashvili offers Georgia a new, possibly last, chance to bring his country back into the West. A lot is at stake. His people are counting on him to bring stability -- as is the U.S., which cares about strategic energy routes that pass through Georgia.

Some people have compared Georgia's new young leaders to the "Pro Patria" government of 20- and 30-something reformers in Estonia in 1992, whose radical free-market program made the smallest of the Baltic countries one of the most successful transition stories in former Soviet empire. There are indeed similarities between Georgia now and Estonia then, beyond our size and recent historical experience.

In 1992, Estonia was economically ruined and the morale of our people sapped. Shops were empty, forcing people to line up for hours to buy rationed bread and milk. The currency (the old Soviet ruble) was worthless. Industrial production declined more 30% in two years after independence in 1991. Inflation was above 1,000% a year, and unemployment 30%. Estonia depended on Russia for energy and most of its trade. Russia was refusing to pull its troops out of the country. Armed extremist groups, on the left and right, as well as a separatist movement supported by Russia posed a serious threat to democracy in Estonia.

The bad news is, this more or less describes Mr. Saakashvili's predicament today. Back in 1992, many people were pessimistic about our chances too. But we survived. Through painful but decisive reforms, Estonia turned West. Today, according to the Heritage Foundation/Wall Street Journal Index of Economic Freedom, Estonia is the sixth-most-free economy in the world, ahead of all but two of its future EU partners.

Of course, Estonia isn't Georgia. Georgia has a different history and cultural heritage and sits in another part of Europe. The policies implemented in one country can never be carbon copied onto another. Each country must find its own way. But there are lessons from other transition countries that are highly relevant for Georgia.

From our experience, lesson No. 1 is to build the political foundations first and only then proceed with economic reform. Don't underestimate the importance of a new modern constitution and democratic legislature elected in free and regular elections. In some transition countries, the need for strong "rule of law" wasn't appreciated. That was a huge mistake. The best intentions can not match the importance of a sound and constantly improving legal environment. There will be no market economy without laws, strong property rights and a working judicial system. And to fight corruption, as the new Georgian president vows to, you can't trust people from the past. Old dogs don't easily learn new tricks.

The second lesson is summed up by a well-known advertising slogan: "Just do it." In other words, be decisive about adopting reforms and stick with them despite the short-term pain they bring. A radical reform program launched as quickly as possible has a much greater chance of being accepted than either a delayed radical program or a non-radical alternative that introduces difficult measures in a piecemeal fashion.

The third lesson is: Keep it simple. Most workable solutions are simple ones. Of course, achieving real change isn't easy. The new Georgian government must stabilize the economy and regain the confidence of financial markets. To do this, Georgia must cut its budget deficit and start to collect taxes.

The simplest way is to introduce a low proportional income tax, which is easy to collect and hard to avoid. The economy must be liberalized and opened to competition. As a weak state, Georgia can't collect custom duties anyhow; it's better to abolish them and turn Georgia to big free-trade area. State-owned companies must be privatized, but only after passing necessary laws and creating institutions. All this creates preconditions for foreign investment, which Georgia desperately needs.

By following this recipe, Georgia will have a chance to turn firmly toward the U.S. and Europe. Cooperation with the West, through NATO, is the only way to get the Russians to pull their troops out and restore the territorial integrity of this strategically placed country. The best way to fight the separatism that threatens Georgia's future, in other words, is successful reform. While the U.S. gave material help to the people's revolution and supports Georgia's independence, Europe seems all too happy to dismiss Georgia as "a far-away country." Now is the time to give real support. If done correctly, Georgia can become a model for the other troubled countries in the Caucasus and Central Asia.

But the best help Georgia can get today is clear encouragement to help itself. In the end, no one else can force reform on a country. Georgia's leaders don't have much time. Hopes are riding high. The window of opportunity to take the extraordinary steps that I've described lasts only a few months, perhaps a year. If Georgia doesn't take advantage of this momentum, it'll waste this chance. Then we'd all lose.

Mart Laar is a former Prime-Minister of Estonia.

God Bless you Mart.

24 posted on 10/20/2006 3:09:37 AM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: All
In 2006 the Cato Institute awarded Laar the Milton Friedman Prize for Advancing Liberty.

Great video!

25 posted on 10/20/2006 3:46:12 AM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: MarMema
all stick and no carrot
26 posted on 10/20/2006 5:20:08 AM PDT by MarMema
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: MarMema

See this video. They speak russian language but with english captions. It is about Akhazia matter.

http://www.babajana.com/video/323/video.htm


27 posted on 10/20/2006 5:37:02 AM PDT by RusIvan ("THINK!" the motto of IBM)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: MarMema

all stick and no carrot==

"..Not even the most optimistic Kremlin apparatchik can be under the illusion that a pro-Moscow force will ever come to power in Georgia now. That might have been a possibility once, Moscow could have offered to help return the separatist territories, and in return Georgia would have been eternally grateful, but that time has long since passed..."

The author doesn't understand a thing about Geogrians. They will NEVER grateful at all! In the past Russian saved Georgia as nation form Turkey and Iran conquerrers. Georgian stalked and promised to be "eternally grateful" for that. So what? How short is gerogian "ethernity"?:)

Russia just writes of Georgia completely. Let them live and survive without us. SO no one in future will meet georgian ungratefulness except.. Americans:)).


28 posted on 10/20/2006 5:43:36 AM PDT by RusIvan ("THINK!" the motto of IBM)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: RusIvan
Russia proclaimed her imdependence FIRST. Then she recognised the independences of other republic.

Was Abkhazia part of that newly independent Russia? No. It was not. Abkhazia has never been part of the Russian Federation. It was never part of the Russian SFSR. The criminal Yeltsin started a war with Georgia unprovoked when he invaded the Georgian province of Abkhazia. Putin follows in Yeltsin's footsteps.

29 posted on 10/20/2006 10:51:19 AM PDT by Tailgunner Joe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: RusIvan

Abkhazia was put into Georgia by that noted Georgian, Stalin. No reason why they shouldn't want to be back with their fellow Russians.


30 posted on 10/20/2006 10:53:16 AM PDT by swarthyguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: swarthyguy

That's completely false. Actually they were always part of Georgia and Stalin granted them autonomy. Abkhazia was never part of the Russian SFSR.


31 posted on 10/20/2006 10:58:53 AM PDT by Tailgunner Joe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Tailgunner Joe

Actually they were always part of Georgia==

No Joe. Akhazia was never the part of Georgia until Stalin made them.

Strange thing. You comdemn Stalin but support Stain' estableished border. Why that? Double standard again?:)


32 posted on 10/23/2006 1:46:27 AM PDT by RusIvan ("THINK!" the motto of IBM)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Tailgunner Joe

The criminal Yeltsin started a war with Georgia unprovoked when he invaded the Georgian province of Abkhazia. ==

Joe is is cheap:). You shouldn't be so biased:).

Everyone who know the recent history knows that in 1992 Geogria started the 2 ethnic wars with Abkhazia and South Osetia. It was ethnic wars like in Kosovo.

No Yeltsin did it. He has the hands full with commies in Russian parlament and other problems. Remember 1992 it was the first year of Russian independence and the election year. Yelstin didn't have no army to invade with at that period because Soviet army was dissloved but Russian army wasn't established yet.

Joe I honestly don't understand what are you blind? Or you just plain forgot even so recent history? 1992 isn't so far back and so much falsification already. What then about more distant history?


33 posted on 10/23/2006 1:57:03 AM PDT by RusIvan ("THINK!" the motto of IBM)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: All

Bump for later reading


34 posted on 10/23/2006 2:54:31 AM PDT by MinorityRepublican (Everyone that doesn't like what America and President Bush has done for Iraq can all go to HELL)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: RusIvan
It was ethnic wars like in Kosovo

Yes, but in this case Russia supported the jihadists like Basayev. Russians don't like how BJ Clinton helped muslims in Kosovo, but Russia helped Basayev exterminate thousands of Georgians Christians. Hypocrites.

35 posted on 10/24/2006 4:44:00 PM PDT by Tailgunner Joe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: RusIvan

Abkhazia was already part of Georgia in 1921 when they were both invaded by Soviet Russia. After that time Abkhazia was a Union Republic of the Georgian SSR. In 1931 Stalin granted Abkhazia autonomy. He did not make Abkhazia part of Georgia at all. That is a complete lie. He granted them autonomy, which of course is worthless if you live in the EVIL EMPIRE.


36 posted on 10/24/2006 4:49:12 PM PDT by Tailgunner Joe
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson