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Newspaper Circulation Falls Sharply (Dinosaur Media DeathWatch™)
The New York Times ^ | October 31, 2006 | KATHARINE Q. SEELYE

Posted on 10/31/2006 4:27:46 AM PST by abb

The circulation of the nation’s daily newspapers plunged during the latest reporting period in one of the sharpest declines in recent history, according to data released yesterday. The slide continues a decades-long trend and adds to the woes of a mature industry already struggling with layoffs and facing the potential sale of some of its flagships.

Over all, average daily circulation dropped by 2.8 percent during the six-month period ended Sept. 30, compared with the period last year, according to an industry analysis of data released by the Audit Bureau of Circulations. Circulation for Sunday papers fell by 3.4 percent.

The figures appear to be the steepest in any comparable six-month period in at least 15 years. They come after the sale of the Knight Ridder newspapers this year and in the midst of a possible sale of the Tribune Company, whose assets include 11 newspapers. The circulation losses also follow recent sour earnings reports, raising questions about why anyone would want to buy a newspaper now.

The losses have accelerated as the industry tries to adjust to the steady migration of readers and advertisers to the Internet. Papers in major metropolitan areas, where more homes are wired for broadband, fared worse than those in smaller markets.

Newspaper executives also attribute some of the decline to deliberate strategies to eliminate so-called bulk sales to third-party sponsors that offer papers free in places like hotels. Advertisers view them as having little value because the readers getting them did not pay for them.

The Los Angeles Times lost 8 percent of its daily circulation and 6 percent on Sunday.

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: dallasmorningnews; dbm; newspapers; nytimes; pinch
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BOO!!!! Bwhaahhhhhhhh
1 posted on 10/31/2006 4:27:47 AM PST by abb
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To: abb
Raoul's First Law of Journalism
BIAS = LAYOFFS

2 posted on 10/31/2006 4:28:31 AM PST by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: 04-Bravo; aimhigh; andyandval; Arizona Carolyn; backhoe; Bahbah; bert; bilhosty; bwteim; ...

Ping


3 posted on 10/31/2006 4:29:07 AM PST by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: abb

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-news31oct31,1,2320180.story?coll=la-headlines-business
Newspaper circulations continue to fall
By James Rainey
Times Staff Writer

October 31, 2006

Most American newspapers continue to lose circulation, according to figures released Monday, but an industry trade group and individual publications countered with statistics showing expanding audiences on their websites.

Weekday circulation at 770 newspapers nationwide equaled 43.7 million a day in the six months ended Sept. 30, down 2.8% from the same period last year, according to the Newspaper Assn. of America. Sunday circulation for 619 newspapers declined 3.4% to 47.6 million. The figures came from data collected by Audit Bureau of Circulations, an independent organization.

The Los Angeles Times joined the vast majority of daily newspapers in reporting declines. The paper's weekday circulation averaged 775,766, down 8% over a year earlier, while Sunday circulation fell 6% to 1,172,005.

The Times attributed the declines to changes in two cut-rate programs. In November, the newspaper eliminated free daily delivery to an average of nearly 29,000 Southern California hotel guests.

In January, the paper increased to 45 cents from 9 cents the rate it charges schools to receive the paper under the Times in Education program. The rate hike triggered a drop in school subscriptions to 20,985 copies on an average weekday from 59,472 copies.

The Times is among many papers that have tried to eliminate cut-rate and free distribution in favor of delivery to customers who seek out the paper.

Times executives said they were heartened that weekday papers delivered to homes and sold at newsstands increased 0.3% to 741,665. Such sales of the Sunday paper declined 2.7% to 1,157,332.

"The September statement reflects our ongoing focus on individually paid circulation," Times Publisher David D. Hiller said. "Our vast reach throughout Southern California remains unsurpassed as does our commitment to serving the evolving needs of our readers."

Like other newspapers, The Times has asked advertisers to judge the paper on its readership, which is bigger than circulation because a single print edition of the newspaper can be read by more than one person.

According to survey data, in the latest six-month period The Times averaged 2.2 million readers on weekdays and 3.3 million on Sunday — slightly higher than in the year-earlier period.

Newspaper advocates point to similar figures nationally and particularly note an increase in the audience for newspapers' websites.

The Newspaper Assn. of America reported that an average of 57 million people — well over one-third of Internet users — visited at least one newspaper website each month in the third quarter of this year, a 24% increase over the same period last year.

"Data that measure the expanded audience is precisely what advertisers want to enhance their understanding of consumer use across newspapers' multiple media platforms," John F. Sturm, the newspaper group's president, said Monday in a statement. "Simply focusing on print circulation numbers in a vacuum obscures that understanding."

james.rainey@latimes.com

*

(INFOBOX BELOW)

Losing readers

-

Large newspapers that reported circulation data for six months that ended in September

Newspaper Circulation Change
USA Today 2,269,509 -1.3%
Wall Street 2,043,235 -1.9%
Journal
N.Y. Times 1,086,798 -3.5%
L.A. Times 775,766 -8%
N.Y. Times 704,011 +5.3%
Daily News (N.Y.) 693,382 +1%
Wash. Post 656,297 -3.3%
Chicago 576,132 -1.7%
Tribune
Houston 508,097 -3.6%
Chronicle
Newsday 413,579 -4.9%


Source: Editor & Publisher


4 posted on 10/31/2006 4:30:07 AM PST by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: abb

Newspaper Circulations Slide More
Broad Decline May Hasten
Move to Hone Web Focus;
New York Tabloids Log Gains
By EMILY STEEL
October 31, 2006; Page B2

Nearly every major U.S. newspaper suffered circulation declines in the past six months, according to the newspaper industry's twice-yearly report from the Audit Bureau of Circulations, the latest confirmation of the difficulties facing the industry as readers flock to the Web and other outlets for news.

Average daily circulation of the 770 newspapers reporting results to the ABC dropped 2.8% on a year-to-year basis during the six months ended Sept. 30, according to an analysis from the Newspaper Association of America, an industry-trade group. The drop in circulation follows a decline of 2.5% during the reporting period ended March 31 of this year and a 2.6% decline in the year-earlier period. Average Sunday circulation at 619 of the country's newspapers fell 3.4% in the most recent six months, according to the NAA. The circulation figures are preliminary and subject to audit by the ABC.

The circulation report, which comes on the heels of several major publishers reporting weaker ad revenue for the third quarter, is likely to reinforce concerns among investors about the industry's prospects. Those concerns have prompted some investors to push companies such as Tribune Co. to restructure or put themselves on the market.

The weaker circulation numbers may fuel efforts by publishers to adjust their business model to put more emphasis on the Web. Newspaper Web sites increased total audience by an average of 8%, according to an NAA analysis of more than 100 newspapers in the nation's top markets.

Some of the biggest declines occurred among the nation's large metropolitan daily papers, including several that have either changed hands or whose future business model is in doubt.

Tribune's Los Angeles Times posted the biggest percentage decline among the nation's top 25 papers, reporting an 8% six-month drop in total paid circulation to 775,766 compared with a year ago. Tribune's board is exploring a sale of the company, under pressure from shareholders unhappy with the company's stock price. Tribune's other major papers reported slightly smaller six-month declines: Chicago Tribune's circulation fell 1.7% while Newsday was down 5%.

Total paid circulation at the Philadelphia Inquirer, a former McClatchy Co. paper purchased this year from Knight Ridder Inc. and then sold this summer to an investor group led by Brian Tierney, chief executive of Philadelphia Media Holdings LLC, dropped 7.6% to 330,622.

At New York Times Co.'s Boston Globe, circulation dropped 6.7% to 386,415. Speculation about the Globe's future intensified last week after it emerged that former General Electric Co. Chairman Jack Welch had discussed with a group of Bostonians the possibility of launching a bid for the paper. The Times hasn't given any indication of wanting to sell the Globe, saying yesterday it views the paper as an important asset.

National newspapers managed less significant circulation drops. Gannett Co.'s USA Today retained its status as the nation's largest-circulation newspaper with total paid circulation at 2,269,509, down 1.3%. The Wall Street Journal, the nation's second-largest paper, published by Dow Jones & Co., reported a 1.9% decrease in total paid circulation to 2,043,235. The New York Times, the country's third-largest paper, saw its circulation decrease 3.5% to 1,086,798.

Several papers, including the Journal and Los Angeles Times, said "individually paid circulation" -- excluding bulk sales to offices, hotels and other places -- reflects a more accurate picture of circulation for advertisers. Individually paid subscriptions increased 9.2% to 1.428 million at the Journal, compared with last year. Daily individually paid circulation at the Los Angeles Times increased 0.3% to 741,665.

Of the nation's top 10 newspapers, only New York's tabloid rivals -- New York Post and New York Daily News -- reported higher total paid weekday circulation. With a 5.1% increase to 704,011, News Corp.'s New York Post emerged ahead of its rival New York Daily News, which reported a 1% increase to 693,382 in total paid weekday circulation. The New York Post's increase in circulation pushed it ahead of the Washington Post as well and made it the country's fifth-largest daily. The Washington Post's circulation fell 3.3% to 656,297.

The Chicago Sun-Times and Dallas Morning News didn't file data, pending the completion of their next six-month audits.

Write to Emily Steel at emily.steel@wsj.com1
URL for this article:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB116222196188607827.html


5 posted on 10/31/2006 4:31:11 AM PST by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: abb
I was listening to the radio yesterday, local news and talk, and couldn't believe what I thought I heard from the national news guy. This would be CBS radio network, he said something to the tune of "People who get their news from the internet, or what they think is news, are responsible for the decline in newspapers."

If the Dems return to power, look for a big change in the internet and the disappearance of FR and sites like it.

6 posted on 10/31/2006 4:32:00 AM PST by Mrs. P (I am most seriously displeased. - Lady Catherine de Bourg)
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To: abb

Newspapers used to be the best thing with which to clean windows. It was something in the ink that aided cleaning.

But, since most newspapers changed to a soy-based ink, they're not even good for cleaining windows anymore.


7 posted on 10/31/2006 4:38:54 AM PST by Peter W. Kessler (Dirt is for racing... asphalt is for getting there.)
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To: Temple Owl

Total paid circulation at the Philadelphia Inquirer, a former McClatchy Co. paper purchased this year from Knight Ridder Inc. and then sold this summer to an investor group led by Brian Tierney, chief executive of Philadelphia Media Holdings LLC, dropped 7.6% to 330,622.


8 posted on 10/31/2006 4:40:57 AM PST by Tribune7 (Go Swann Go Santorum)
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To: Mrs. P
"People who get their news from the internet, or what they think is news..."

If it doesn't promote the liberal agenda, it's not news.

9 posted on 10/31/2006 4:41:26 AM PST by Steely Tom
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To: abb

Happy Halloween to the weenies at the NYT.


10 posted on 10/31/2006 4:47:28 AM PST by Rome2000 (Peace is not an option)
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To: abb

TRICK OR TREAT!


11 posted on 10/31/2006 4:53:57 AM PST by Stallone ("Ridicule is the Best Test of Truth" - Earl of Shaftesbury)
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To: abb; All

This info is not new !

I read about this yesterday at NewsBusters.org which was
linked to an article at Michele Malkin's website .

She got her info from PUBLISHERS & EDITORS .

That site did point out that The New York Post was a tabloid .


12 posted on 10/31/2006 4:58:33 AM PST by marc costanzo (Name your poison :-))
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To: abb; All

>>Source: Editor & Publisher<<

Oh yeah, got that reversed there .


13 posted on 10/31/2006 4:59:31 AM PST by marc costanzo (Name your poison :-))
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To: marc costanzo
This info is not new !

These particular article in the New York Times, LA Times and the WSJ were published today. They are reporting on the Audit Bureau of Circulation's FAS-FAX report released yesterday.

Articles that chronicle the death of the Dinosaur Media cannot be posted too much.

14 posted on 10/31/2006 5:08:45 AM PST by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: Mrs. P; abb

Hey, here is another factor- -

The New York Post is the only newspaper that reported Keith Olbermann's panic attack when he discovered that someone had mailed him a 'Prank Anthrax' letter .

The New York Daily News reported the incident in Clinton's Harlem office the other day, and did so in a semi-humorous way :-)

Maybe the American People like to read about such stuff .

The NY Post got high circulation in the 1980's by headlining stories about serial killers .


15 posted on 10/31/2006 5:09:56 AM PST by marc costanzo (Name your poison :-))
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To: abb

>>Articles that chronicle the death of the Dinosaur Media cannot be posted too much.
<<

OKAY !


16 posted on 10/31/2006 5:11:40 AM PST by marc costanzo (Name your poison :-))
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To: abb

TOP 20 U.S. NEWSPAPERS, BY CIRCULATION


Newspaper Circulation Change from March-Sept. 2006
1. USA Today 2,269,509 -1.3%
2. The Wall Street Journal 2,043,235 -1.9%
3. The New York Times 1,086,798 -3.5%
4. Los Angeles Times 775,766 -8%
5. New York Post 704,011 +5.1%
6. New York Daily News 693,382 +1%
7. The Washington Post 656,297 -3.3%
8. Chicago Tribune 576,132 -1.7%
9. Houston Chronicle 508,097 -3.7%
10. Newsday, Long Island 410,579 -5%
11. The Arizona Republic 397,294 -2.6%
12. The Boston Globe 386,415 -6.7%
13. The Star-Ledger of Newark, N.J., 378,100 -5.5%
14. San Francisco Chronicle 373,805 -5.4%
15. Star Tribune of Minneapolis-St. Paul 358,887 -4.2%
16. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution 350,157 -3.5%
17. The Plain Dealer, Cleveland 336,939 -0.6%
18. The Philadelphia Inquirer 330,622 -7.6%
19. Detroit Free Press 328,628 -3.6%
20. The Oregonian 310,803 -6.8%


17 posted on 10/31/2006 5:12:12 AM PST by OESY
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To: All

http://publications.mediapost.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=50407&art_type=10
Leading U.S. Newspapers Take Huge Circ Hits
by Erik Sass, Tuesday, Oct 31, 2006 7:45 AM ET
NEWSPAPERS ARE TAKING BIG HITS across the board, according to the most recent semi-annual FAS-FAX report from the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC). During the six months ending in September, total daily circulation sank 2.8% compared to the same period last year, while Sunday circulation dropped 3.4%. The latest round of bad news reinforces the last FAS-FAX report covering the six-month period up to March 2006, which showed total paid circulation sinking 2.5% from last year. The previous report, covering the six months before September 2005, had total paid circulation down 2.6%.

The U.S.'s leading national and regional dailies were affected to varying degrees. The New York Times saw daily and Sunday circulation fall about 3.5% to about 1,087,000 and 1,624,000, respectively. The Washington Post daily circ fell 3.3% to 656,000, and Sunday fell 3.6% to 930,000. USA Today's daily circulation fell 1.3% to about 2,269,000. And at The Wall Street Journal, daily circ dipped 2% to about 2,043,000, while the weekend edition sank 6.7% to 1,946,000.

The ABC report probably won't be much help to the Tribune Company as its tries to drum up buyer interest in its various properties, including its three biggest papers. Flagship Chicago Tribune performed best, with daily circ only dropping 1.7% to 576,000, and Sunday circ dipping 1.3% to 938,000. But the Baltimore Sun's daily circ fell 4.5% to 236,000 as Sunday circ tumbled 9% to 381,000. The embattled Los Angeles Times saw daily circ decline 8% to 776,000 as Sunday circ dropped 6.1% to 1,172,000.

Some of the worst results came from the Boston Globe, another big regional daily owned by the New York Times Company that may also be up for sale. Continuing its free fall, the Globe's daily circ fell 7% to 386,000 and Sunday circ plunged 10% to 587,000. Not coincidentally, the Times' New England group, led by the Globe, has also been the company's poorest performing division in terms of ad revenue.

That said, the Globe is not alone. Other big-city papers are beset with circulation woes.

The Philadelphia Inquirer lost 7.6% of its daily circulation, ending up at 331,000, while Sunday circ dropped 4.5% to 682,000. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution held its own in daily circ, which sank just 3.5% to 350,000--but took a big hit on Sundays, which fell 8% to 524,000. The combined English- and Spanish-language editions of the Miami Herald turned in similar numbers, with daily circ down 8.8% to 266,000, and Sunday circ down 8.4% to 459,000. The San Francisco Chronicle's daily circ fell 5.4% to 374,000, as Sunday circ fell 6.3% to 433,000. Finally, the Minneapolis-St. Paul Star-Tribune's daily circ fell 4.2% to 359,000, and took a 6.4% hit in Sunday circ, ending at 596,000.


18 posted on 10/31/2006 5:13:17 AM PST by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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To: Steely Tom

>>"People who get their news from the internet, or what they think is news..."
If it doesn't promote the liberal agenda, it's not news.
<<

So much of what is on The 'Net is left-wing .

There is a gagaload of Liberal Material on these endless moonbat blogs ~ !


19 posted on 10/31/2006 5:13:30 AM PST by marc costanzo (Name your poison :-))
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To: All

http://www.baltimoresun.com/business/bal-bz.circulation31oct31,0,1274135.story?coll=bal-business-headlines

From the Baltimore Sun
Circulation falls again at most big newspapers
Decline averages nearly 3%; Sun daily figure drops 4.5%

Click here to find out more!
By Nick Madigan
Sun reporter

October 31, 2006

Circulation figures at most major urban newspapers, including The Sun, continued falling over the past year, according to Audit Bureau of Circulations figures released yesterday that showed a print media industry beset by competition from the Internet and new forms of technology.

Daily circulation dropped an average 2.8 percent at the 770 newspapers that reported numbers for the six-month period that ended on Sept. 30 compared with the corresponding period last year. Circulation at 619 Sunday papers was down 3.4 percent.

Among the few papers to announce good news was the New York Post, which has been trying to overtake its bitter rival, the New York Daily News, for years and finally did so. The splashy tabloid, which specializes in crime and celebrity news, vaulted over both the News and The Washington Post to become the nation's fifth-largest newspaper. Its daily circulation was up 5.1 percent, for a total of 704,011 copies.

Most other papers saw declines - in some cases, big ones. Among the big-city papers most affected, the Los Angeles Times - owned, like The Sun, by Chicago's Tribune Co. - saw its daily circulation drop 8 percent, to 775,766, while its Sunday editions fell 6 percent, to 1,172,005. Tribune recently replaced The Times' publisher after a dispute over staffing.

The company's Chicago Tribune was less badly hit in the new tabulations, dropping 1.7 percent in daily circulation, to 576,132, and by 1.3 percent on Sundays, to 937,907.

The Sun's daily circulation declined 4.5 percent, to 236,172, while Sunday circulation was down 9.1 percent, to 380,701.

The ABC figures include so-called "other-paid" circulation, meaning copies bought in bulk, mostly as part of advertising promotions, a category that The Sun and other papers have been reducing because it is not valued highly by advertisers. On Sundays alone, The Sun has cut such circulation by nearly 70 percent, or more than 14,000 papers, said Tim Thomas, vice president for marketing.

Rival not a factor
Thomas said the launch in April of The Examiner, a free competing newspaper whose circulation is not audited by ABC, appears to have had "basically no impact" on The Sun's numbers. The Sun's daily circulation has remained steady since The Examiner began publishing, the ABC figures show. The Examiner does not publish a Sunday edition.

Thomas said total readership of The Sun and other newspapers has increased when online readers are taken into account. He said the combined readership of The Sun and BaltimoreSun.com is up by almost 10,000 readers over the 12-month period that ended in February 2006, for an average weekly audience of almost 1.3 million. The Sun reported last week that a group of Baltimore business leaders, headed by former Baltimore County Executive Theodore G. Venetoulis, would try to buy the paper from Tribune, which owns 11 newspapers and is studying whether to sell the company or some of its properties.

The new circulation numbers are a sobering echo of the newspaper's industry's troubles. The country's largest circulation daily, USA Today, dropped 1.3 percent, to 2,269,509, while its runner-up, The Wall Street Journal, was down 1.9 percent, to 2,043,235, on weekdays, and 6.7 percent, to 1,945,830, in its weekend edition.

The third-largest paper, The New York Times, lost 3.5 percent daily and Sunday. The Washington Post saw daily circulation dip 3.3 percent and Sunday 3.6 percent.

'Dramatic numbers'
Tom Rosenstiel, director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism, a research organization that evaluates the performance of the press, said that while declines in newspaper circulation began as far back as 1990, they were generally under 1 percent a year. In 2004, the overall drop grew to about 2 percent.

"So now you're seeing some pretty dramatic numbers," Rosenstiel said. "On its face, 3 percent is not a huge number, but if each year the newspaper business loses 3 percent of its circulation, it doesn't take very long for this to become critical."

nick.madigan@baltsun.com


20 posted on 10/31/2006 5:36:39 AM PST by abb (The Dinosaur Media: A One-Way Medium in a Two-Way World)
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