Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

NY cracks down on illegal mystery meats
Yahoo AP ^ | 1 December 2006 one hour 26 minutes ago | ADAM GOLDMAN, AP Business Writer

Posted on 12/01/2006 2:33:53 PM PST by shrinkermd

click here to read article


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-177 last
To: 1COUNTER-MORTER-68; Bacon Man; Hap

"Roasted something on a stick" . . . sounds like every food my Renaissance Festival sells! :)


151 posted on 12/03/2006 10:22:04 AM PST by Xenalyte (Anything is possible when you don't understand how anything happens.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 132 | View Replies]

To: Xenalyte

The last case of Hoof in mouth disease in the US was resultant from individuals feeding leftover foreign meat sources to their hogs. Hoof in mouth disease is a Rhinovirus that can become airborne and travel as much as 50 miles in a day with air currents and still be viable. Hoof In Mouth disease introduced into our food production system would be catastrophic.


152 posted on 12/03/2006 10:26:51 AM PST by vetvetdoug
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 147 | View Replies]

To: vetvetdoug

"Leftover foreign meat sources" sounds like something I wouldn't feed to pigs I like.


153 posted on 12/03/2006 10:28:11 AM PST by Xenalyte (Anything is possible when you don't understand how anything happens.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 152 | View Replies]

To: shrinkermd
Headline: NY cracks down on illegal mystery meats aliens

Now, there's a headline I would love to see. It would be a helluva lot more good for New York and America!

154 posted on 12/03/2006 10:42:30 AM PST by Gritty (People writing laws for my own good are more dangerous than a truck full of cigarettes-S Sebelius)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TOneocon
smoked rodent meat

GROSS ..... Don't y'all love multiculturalism now. s/

Don't y'all love some damn Yankee makin' fun of our Louisiana cookin'?

Smoked Nutria and Andouille Sausage Gumbo

155 posted on 12/03/2006 11:07:15 AM PST by Polybius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Snoopers-868th
Well, the first thing that comes to mind is the cats that were caged and skinned for the use of the fur that was used to make pretty little kittens and cats in various positions. They were sold here until animal rights had a fit about it and put an end to it.

First off, food and fur are two different things. Second, were the cats killed humanely? If skinning cats is such a horror, where's your sympathy for mink and rabbits and calves?

The second thing that comes to mind is how many would object to their precious little dog or cat appearing on a hook in the local grocery for sale (so long as it was FDA approved)?

*My* dog or cat is mine. Plenty of folks have pet hogs, and that Babe in the movie and Wilbur in Charlotte's Web were cute as all get-out. Does that mean we should stop eating pork? What you're missing is that one act is not moral and another immoral because you find one of them icky and not the other.A little intellectual consistency is all I'm asking for.

I don't care to go to any store and see a filthy rat, a cat, a dog, an iguana or an armadillo.

Then vote with your feet and dollars -- don't go to stores that offer those meats.

My culture does not eat these animals

If "your culture" is, broadly, American, then there are a lot of folks eating armadillo, possum, rabbit, squirrel, raccoon, and all kinds of other critters I'm not in a hurry to try. Dogs, cats, and rats have all found their way to the table, but generally only in desperate times. Iguanas aren't widespread fare, because they're not indigenous to North America, but Americans do eat the reptiles we do have around, from gators to rattlesnakes to Gila monsters.

When I moved out of my mom's house to fend for myself, I tried making chili according to Mom's recipe (more of a philosophy than a recipe, really). Mine was never as good, of course. Only after some prodding did I find out that Mom used venison -- she had friends who hunted,, and she didn't want to tell us when we were kids that we were eating Bambi. I need to make friends with more hunters so I can get hold of some good venison for my next batch of chili.

and the proof is that the FDA is seeking this stuff out.

The FDA regulates hygeine, not matters of taste. If there's enough demand for exotic meats, someone will set up a duly regulated slaughterhouse and butcher to serve the market. The issue is that these markets serve a relatively small market and have flown under the government's radar.

Assimilate is the issue. When are people here going to notice the difference?

So now assimilating means abandoning cuisine that isn't "American," however you define it? Oh, I hope not. I'm not that old, but when I was a kid, spaghetti, tacos and Sweet and Sour Pork were about as exotic as ethnic cuisine got -- and that in a fairly large city. Now, I'm not more than a ten-minute drive from Indian, Thai, Lebanese, Brazilian, Japanese, Moroccan and Cuban restaurants, among others.

Mock "diversity" if you must, but in areas like food and music, I find it a good thing. Joining the melting pot doesn't mean you don't bring your own ingredients with you. I, for one, have no problem with eating a massaman curry while listening to a good samba band and following up with a single-malt scotch. Only in America.

If these folks want to eat cat and dog or rat and iguana they can go to their country and eat it. I am sure they would expect me to assimilate.

Not really. When I was in Thailand, no one seemed perturbed by the fact that I mostly stuck with the familiar chicken and shellfish. I eventually tried the squid, and wasn't that impressed.

I did get a lecture on the various ways of preparing grasshoppers and centipedes, but I suspect they were just messing with the farang's head. I was never offered bugs at the table, and didn't see them in the market stalls. The old woman selling dried fish heads out of a wicker basket was kind of interesting, though.

And you have to get pretty far off the beaten path to find a country without a McDonald's, a KFC, or if not a big chain outlet, a burger or pizza joint of some kind. One rule of thumb: If you see Diet Coke (called Coke Light in much of the world), you're in a well-touristed area where you can expect to find Western cuisine.

An amusing (at least to me) aside: Khao San Road, the young-and-cheap tourist district of Bangkok (think a lot of backpackers and youth hostels) had a whole lot of falafel stands. Apparently, Thailand is a popular destination for young Israelis.

I am no animal rights advocate. I simply find it rather uncivilized and primative.

That's nothing but habit speaking. The belief that The Things I'm Used to are The Way Things Should Be. Why -- on what principle -- is killing and eating a dog less civilized than killing and eating a pig? As pets, pigs are as intelligent, loyal and loving as dogs. Anatomically, they're more similar to humans than any other non-primate -- that's why pigs are used for heart valve replacement surgery.

I suppose you can't wait for the living worms/larva next to the potato salad in the deli?

I'd rather not. I probably wouldn't go back to that deli. But I wouldn't call on the government to shut them down for serving stuff I don't like.

Shall we accept cannibalism too--afterall it is their culture? We just need to get the FDA to approve it and go along with their tribal laws.

There is a clear line between killing people for food, which is a crime everywhere, and killing other animals, which is done in every city and county every day. You have offered no such clear line between killing animals you like a lot, which is uncivilized and primitive, and killing animals you don't like so much, which is fine and dandy.

If there is a rational moral, ethical or legal principle under which it's acceptable to eat a hog but nor a dog, I have yet to hear it. If there's a legitimate distinction, I'd think someone would be able to articulate it. Since no one has, I can only attribute it to prejudice.

156 posted on 12/03/2006 11:18:28 AM PST by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 125 | View Replies]

To: Xenalyte

LOL,,,"Roasted" is good,,,I had to draw the line at the
"Fish-Heads and Rice",(bad),Korean C-Rations were worse;0)


157 posted on 12/03/2006 11:33:30 AM PST by 1COUNTER-MORTER-68 (THROWING ANOTHER BULLET-RIDDLED TV IN THE PILE OUT BACK~~~~~)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 151 | View Replies]

To: shrinkermd

Many years ago, a Chinese restaurant in NJ was caught serving road-kill venison, deer being quite numerous there. The radio news said they were serving "Moo Goo Gai Bambi" :) Another was serving cat meat, as I recall. I once gave a very fresh road-kill deer to a Laotian refugee family and they were glad to get it.


158 posted on 12/03/2006 11:34:38 AM PST by USMCPOP (Father of LCpl. Karl Linn, KIA 1/26/2005 Al Haqlaniyah, Iraq)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: shrinkermd

"Mmmmmmmm, illegal mystery meat."

159 posted on 12/03/2006 11:35:28 AM PST by dfwgator
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Polybius

Funny thing is, that site is from the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries. They're still trying to create some kind of market demand for Nutria so enterprising individuals will thin out the population for them. I wish them luck with that.

I think what the Nutria needs is a new name. No one would pause to consider a Patagonian Toothfish on the menu, but when they were renamed Chilean Sea Bass, they became all kinds of trendy. I suggest renaming the nutria either the bayou beaver or the Louisiana swamp mink, and then watch the coats fly off the shelves.

No one wants to buy boiled orange-toothed swamp rat, but call it bayou grind etouffée and put Emeril's signature on the box, and hoo-boy!


160 posted on 12/03/2006 11:35:35 AM PST by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 155 | View Replies]

To: Xenalyte
"Leftover foreign meat sources" sounds like something I wouldn't feed to pigs I like.

We've got to stop feeding rendered animal leftovers to herbivores, period. It's already a pretty well-established vector for prion diseases -- like BSE (mad cow), srapie and kuru. It's a pretty much ideal delivery method to infect livestock, because their immune systems aren't equipped to resist. They aren't built to ingest other animals.

161 posted on 12/03/2006 11:41:06 AM PST by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 153 | View Replies]

To: 1COUNTER-MORTER-68

Oooh, fish-heads are a no-go for me.

Especially if they still have their eyes.


162 posted on 12/03/2006 11:44:07 AM PST by Xenalyte (Anything is possible when you don't understand how anything happens.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 157 | View Replies]

To: Bahbah
Yuck was my reaction. Armadillo?

Or as they're called in south Georgia and north Florida (probably other places, but I can only speak to those two), possum on the half-shell.

I'm convinced that the word "delicacy" means "nasty stuff we had to eat a long time ago and got used to." That's the only explanation for people eating fish eyeballs, squirrel brains and chitlins. While I appreciate the cultural heritage, dude. This ain't Reconstruction. We've got a little money now, and there are some animals and some parts of the hog we can afford to throw away.

I once swore that I would never eat chicken livers or gizzards again. Someone else challenged me: What if you were starving, and all you had were livers and gizzards? My answer was that I'd have catfish for dinner. Chicken livers are good bait.

163 posted on 12/03/2006 11:51:26 AM PST by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 121 | View Replies]

To: Solamente
I learned a slightly different version:

Great green gobs of greasy grimey gopher guts,

Mutilated monkey meat,

Itsy bitsy birdie feet,

"Little dirty birdie feet"
French fried eye-balls,

Rolling down a muddy street,

And I forgot my spoon!

"But I brought my straw ..." Slurping noises optional but recommended.

164 posted on 12/03/2006 11:54:36 AM PST by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: ReignOfError

Very good response. Of course, you are correct and based on your statements I am found to be prejudice.


165 posted on 12/03/2006 12:31:33 PM PST by Snoopers-868th
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 156 | View Replies]

To: Snoopers-868th
Very good response.

Thanks.

Of course, you are correct and based on your statements I am found to be prejudice.

No shame in that. Everyone has prejudices, and it would be impossible to get through the day without reaching snap judgments every minute. Eliminating prejudice is an impossible, and maybe even counter-productive, goal. The goal should be to recognize it and look past it.

For example, when I meet Asian people, my first instinct is that I expect them to have an accent and limited English skills. I grew up in the '70s, in a city that didn't have many Asians at the time, so most of the Asian kids I met in school were boat people or other recent arrivals, or first-generation Americans. That shaped my expectations.

Having lived and learned, I know that isn't a safe or factual assumption, but it's still there. I've met, worked with and dated Asians who grew up in this country, spoke English at least as well as I do, went to the high school down the road from mine, played in the marching band across the stadium from the one I played in, and whose families had been here about as long as mine, give or take a generation or two. They're every ounce as American as I am. My first-blush assumption isn't factual, but it's still there.

166 posted on 12/03/2006 1:06:15 PM PST by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 165 | View Replies]

To: ReignOfError

Here's ours:

Gobs and gobs of greasy grimey gopher guts,

Mutilated monkey meat,

Little dirty birdie feet

A one pint can of all-purpose porpoise pus

Floating in pink lemonade!


167 posted on 12/03/2006 1:10:43 PM PST by kkmo9 ("My grandmother wanted me to have an education, so she kept me out of school." Margaret Mead)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 164 | View Replies]

To: ReignOfError

I am so glad to again be reading threads that offer some information rather than name-calling. I so hope FR takes the turn back to where it was when people exchanged this type of conversation. Thanks for your enlightenment and contribution to FreeRepublic.


168 posted on 12/03/2006 1:23:32 PM PST by Snoopers-868th
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 166 | View Replies]

To: Solamente

Haven't heard that since 1959.


169 posted on 12/03/2006 1:26:01 PM PST by wtc911 (You can't get there from here)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: ReignOfError
Prejudice: My son sat in front of a State review board where a black Lt asked him if he had any prejudice. My son answered yes. The Lt. jerked his head back in amazement and my son said I don't like broccoli. He is now a State Trooper. I agree we all have prejudice. I should be ordered to eat them from my initial post!! LOL
170 posted on 12/03/2006 1:31:24 PM PST by Snoopers-868th
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 166 | View Replies]

To: ReignOfError
I suggest renaming the nutria .... the bayou beaver.....

Sorry, but that is already the Registered Trademark of a certain establishment in New Orleans. ;-)


171 posted on 12/03/2006 6:41:03 PM PST by Polybius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 160 | View Replies]

To: ReignOfError

I saw capybara in the swamps in Northern Argentina when I was there. They are huge! Their tracks were the size of my whole hand.


172 posted on 12/04/2006 6:14:29 AM PST by CholeraJoe (Spork weasels ain't afraid of nuthin' but running out of sardines.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 64 | View Replies]

To: Chickensoup

"Longpork" is "polynesian" (rather overbroad statement, there) for human meat.

There are numerous reports of various former cannibalistic islanders, when encountering SPAM for the first time, who consistently reported that SPAM tasted like longpork.

SPAM remains extremely popular in the islands --- in part for this reason, perhaps, or, more likely because, given the islands' remoteness and questionable electricity, potted meat is a necessary part of the diet.


173 posted on 12/04/2006 7:17:30 AM PST by MeanWestTexan (Kol Hakavod Lezahal)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 79 | View Replies]

To: MeanWestTexan
"Longpork" is "polynesian" (rather overbroad statement, there) for human meat.

There are numerous reports of various former cannibalistic islanders, when encountering SPAM for the first time, who consistently reported that SPAM tasted like longpork.

SPAM remains extremely popular in the islands --- in part for this reason, perhaps, or, more likely because, given the islands' remoteness and questionable electricity, potted meat is a necessary part of the diet.

An alternative explanation is that "long pork" got the name because pork is the main meat eaten in the South Pacific, other than seafood, at least. When you ask folks, "what does it taste like," their first reference is going to be to something familiar. Which is why any weird thing Americans eat almost always "tastes like chicken."

SPAM is popular in places where pork is a dietary staple, because it's easy to prepare and, if we can drop our snobbishness long enough to admit it, pretty darn tasty. Not to mention that it's nice and greasy, and if you're used to your pork being dry and tough, that's pretty nice.

Not to digress too far, but cannibalism is a thorny problem for anthropologists. In the 19th century and before, Westerners were pretty well prepared to believe any story about cannibalism wherever they heard it. Problem is, if you're an islander, and you want these pale people with their big shiny spears and their boom-sticks to take out your rivals on the next island, you tell them those folks are cannibals.

Then, in the 20th century, the scholarly pendulum swung the other way. More and more scholars became convinced that cannibalism was never a widespread or long-standing practice anywhere.

It happened, and could happen today, in dire survival circumstances like Albert Packer or the Donner Party or the Uruguayan rugby team. And it's practiced as a terror tactic in wartime, which was proven pretty incontrovertibly at Chaco Canyon; I won't get into the gross details unless someone asks. But as an ordinary part of everyday life, evidence of it is scant and anecdotal.

I've seen video of an African funeral rite, where young people are asked to eat a bit of their recently-deceased ancestor's flesh, to absorb his strength and wisdom. A pinch, no wider than a dime, clearly symbolic and not nutritional. And yet these kids are gagging, choking it down with more discomfort than I ever had eating a brussels sprout. That suggests, at least, that cannibalism is a universal and instinctive taboo, even in cultures where it's been a ritual for centuries.

As far as Polynesian tales of cannibalism go, they're a little dodgy, too. Western explorers used to have the patronizing assumption that "natives" couldn't possibly have the wit or guile to mess with their heads. But it doesn't take an Oxford education to figure out "Oooh! See how wide his eyes got when I joked about us eating our dead? That scares him. We can work with that."

174 posted on 12/05/2006 9:36:35 AM PST by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 173 | View Replies]

To: Snoopers-868th
Prejudice: My son sat in front of a State review board where a black Lt asked him if he had any prejudice. My son answered yes. The Lt. jerked his head back in amazement and my son said I don't like broccoli. He is now a State Trooper. I agree we all have prejudice. I should be ordered to eat them from my initial post!! LOL

Eat which? If I had to choose between broccoli and iguana, I'd have to ask whether I'd have cheese sauce and how the iguana was marinaded. Even then, it would be a tough call.

175 posted on 12/05/2006 9:39:46 AM PST by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 170 | View Replies]

To: CholeraJoe
I saw capybara in the swamps in Northern Argentina when I was there. They are huge! Their tracks were the size of my whole hand.

I don't know if they're friendly, or if they can be leash-trained, but if so I would love to have a pet capybara. Just to watch folks wig out. And I bet there aren't any zoning rules against it, just because no one thought of it before.

Now, getting one into the country is a whole 'nother matter.

176 posted on 12/05/2006 9:45:56 AM PST by ReignOfError
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 172 | View Replies]

To: ReignOfError
I checked the Convention on International Trafficking in Endangered Species (CITES) and they are not listed in any of the Appendices to the Treaty. I'm certain that US Fish and Wildlife Service would want some money but it could be done.

Since they are hunted for food, they're skittish around humans. Best to get a young one.

177 posted on 12/05/2006 11:25:47 AM PST by CholeraJoe (Spork weasels ain't afraid of nuthin' but running out of sardines.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 176 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first previous 1-5051-100101-150151-177 last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson