Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Home-schooling special: Preach your children well
NewScientist.com ^ | 11 November 2006 | Amanda Gefter

Posted on 12/04/2006 8:31:37 AM PST by Sopater

TO THE unsuspecting visitor, Patrick Henry College looks like a typical American liberal-arts college tucked away amidst the rolling green farmlands of Virginia. Its curriculum is far from typical, however, and anything but liberal. Witness this lecture on faith and reason in an idyllic red-brick college building reminiscent of colonial America. As the speaker takes to the podium, several students silence their cellphones. One puts down his copy of The Wall Street Journal and takes out his Bible. They bow their heads and pray to Jesus, then stand up and sing a hymn, belting out "Holy, holy, holy" with gusto. Eventually, the speaker addresses the crowd.

"Christians increasingly have an advantage in the educational enterprise," he says. "This is evident in the success of Christian home-schooled children, as compared to their government-schooled friends who have spent their time constructing their own truths." The students, all evangelical Christians, applaud loudly. Most of them were schooled at home before arriving at Patrick Henry - a college created especially for them.

These students are part of a large, well-organised movement that is empowering parents to teach their children creationist biology and other unorthodox versions of science at home, all centred on the idea that God created Earth in six days about 6000 years ago. Patrick Henry, near the town of Purcellville, about 60 kilometres north-west of Washington DC, is gearing up to groom home-schooled students for political office and typifies a movement that seems set to expand, opening up a new front in the battle between creationists and Darwinian evolutionists. New Scientist investigated how home-schooling, with its considerable legal support, is quietly transforming the landscape of science education in the US, subverting and possibly threatening the public school system that has fought hard against imposing a Christian viewpoint on science teaching.

(Excerpt) Read more at newscientist.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: christianmythology; creation; crevo; evolution; homeschool; myths; science; superstition
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-65 next last
To judge home-school applicants, they rely mostly on standardised tests of factual knowledge. Such tests cannot, however, reveal whether or not a student understands scientific method, a compulsory subject in public schools but not for home-schoolers.

Abeka, the publisher of the 9th grade science book that this article singles out, teaches the scientific method. Sounds like evolutionists are scared of the acedemic success of home-schoolers.
1 posted on 12/04/2006 8:31:39 AM PST by Sopater
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: DaveLoneRanger

Ping...


2 posted on 12/04/2006 8:33:08 AM PST by Tired of Taxes (That's taxes, not Texas. I have no beef with TX. NJ has the highest property taxes in the nation.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

When will we begin applying the scientific method to global warming?


3 posted on 12/04/2006 8:35:11 AM PST by CertainInalienableRights
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CertainInalienableRights

oops, I should have put global warming in quotes: "global warming"


4 posted on 12/04/2006 8:35:47 AM PST by CertainInalienableRights
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Sopater
Many such universities today accept home-schooled students, although this was not the case a decade ago

Oh phooey! Not true. My sister has homeschooled for years. Her oldest kids had no problems getting into secular universities. One's a structural engineer, the other has a degree and is a pilot.

The Colfax kids (Homeschooling for Excellence) went to Harvard, and they homeschooled in the 70's and 80's.

5 posted on 12/04/2006 8:39:52 AM PST by dawn53
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

If a parent is smart they will teach what Darwinism consists of so that the child will know what it is rather than indoctrinate the child (as the school would) that this is the only scientific truth. I myself am not a Biblical literalist, but definitely do believe that the material world had/has a Creator. Darwinism is used in school indoctrination to support atheism unfortunately.


6 posted on 12/04/2006 8:43:16 AM PST by brooklyn dave (Dhimmis better not be Dhummis!!!!------or else!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

Quite the hit piece. So now we homeschoolers are subverting the public school system. Sorry, I have no intention of offering up my children to the tender mercies of the NEA socialists, much to the writer's chagrin.


7 posted on 12/04/2006 8:44:21 AM PST by LadyNavyVet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

This article demonstrates the same kind of arrogance that I find among many home school critics. I had a neighbor offer to teach my kids science, to counter our indoctrination. She was surprised that my wife jumped on the opportunity… and even more surprised that my kids new her material better than she did… but still didn’t believe it.

Craig

p.s. Who formed the vast home school conspiracy and let me know about it?


8 posted on 12/04/2006 8:45:30 AM PST by csivils
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Sopater
I believe that the single greatest contribution that can be made at this time to the education space would be the development of a freely available, down loadable, k-12 curriculum. If backed with a test and acceptance via third party or proctor that would provide accreditation, then you would have a the ability for anyone... regardless of religion or location or finances.
9 posted on 12/04/2006 8:47:26 AM PST by taxcontrol
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sopater
Sounds like evolutionists are scared of the acedemic success of home-schoolers.

Nope. Not all homeschoolers do it so they can better indoctrinate their children in religion. Many do it simply because they believe they can provide a better education in a safer environment.

10 posted on 12/04/2006 8:49:55 AM PST by antiRepublicrat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: brooklyn dave
If a parent is smart they will teach what Darwinism consists of

Excellent point brooklyn dave. That is exactly what I do. If you don't teach your children the controversy, teach the facts and the various proposed theories, and then explain why you believe in your partiulcar theory and reject the others, the minute that you kids here a new theory from someone they admire and respect (such as a college prof), all you've ever taught them is out the window.

Children want to be given all of the evidence, all of the possibilities, and then be taught how to think critically. Eventually, they will all come to their own conlcusions.
11 posted on 12/04/2006 8:50:11 AM PST by Sopater (Creatio Ex Nihilo)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

"is quietly transforming the landscape of science education in the US, subverting and possibly threatening the public school system..."

If the US public school system is really so fragile that it is threatened by the small minority who homeschool and attend parochial schools, then they need to make some major changes, like, yesterday.


12 posted on 12/04/2006 8:50:32 AM PST by mrs. a (It's a short life but a merry one...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

Oh, boo-hoo! The home schooling phenomenon must be hurting them financially now.


13 posted on 12/04/2006 8:50:42 AM PST by TommyDale (Iran President Ahmadinejad is shorter than Tom Daschle!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

As the oh so erudite britishers slide back into the barbarism of moloch worship (statism), their anxiety increases concerning those who are unwilling to go down with their sinking cause. Disease resents health.


14 posted on 12/04/2006 8:52:06 AM PST by TomSmedley (Calvinist, optimist, home schooling dad, exuberant husband, technical writer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: brooklyn dave

Exactly. I've told my kids that, in the Bible, God told us what he did. It's up to scientists to figure out how he did it. Faith and reason do not have to be at odds with each other.


15 posted on 12/04/2006 8:54:03 AM PST by LadyNavyVet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: antiRepublicrat
Nope. Not all homeschoolers do it so they can better indoctrinate their children in religion.

Absolutes like that fully discredit anything further you may have to say. You have obviously been indoctrinated yourself by anti-homeschool propaganda.

I started homeshooling my children to remove them from what I saw as a volatile and hostile environment. I was not a Christian, nor religious in any way. I'm sure that I was not alone.
16 posted on 12/04/2006 8:55:26 AM PST by Sopater (Creatio Ex Nihilo)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: antiRepublicrat

Oops, sorry antiRepublicrat, I just more closely read your post and I believe that I misread it the first time. My apologies.


17 posted on 12/04/2006 8:56:48 AM PST by Sopater (Creatio Ex Nihilo)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: csivils

"my kids new her material better than she did"

They "new" her material? You're not the one doing the homeschooling, are you? ;-D


18 posted on 12/04/2006 8:57:36 AM PST by linda_22003
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: mrs. a
If the US public school system is really so fragile that it is threatened by the small minority who homeschool and attend parochial schools, then they need to make some major changes, like, yesterday.

Cornered carnivors, and ideologs on their last legs, are most vicious and dangerous. Like Peter Pan's Tinkerbelle, public education will disappear when enough folks simply quit believing in it. As my favorite marxist jesuit put in,


19 posted on 12/04/2006 8:59:42 AM PST by TomSmedley (Calvinist, optimist, home schooling dad, exuberant husband, technical writer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

What a warped and narrow view of home schooling. From this article you would think that the entire motivation for the American home schooling movement is to teach children creationism and hide them from evolutionary biology. We home school our kids and know dozens of families who do the same. I don't know a single one of those families whose primary motivation to home school was creationism. I know a lot of them who wanted their kids to learn to read before 4th grade, and a lot of them who wanted their kids to learn American History from a viewpoint that America is not the greatest force for evil in the world. You can make the argument that home schooling is strongly driven by the desire of parents to have their kids get a Christian education, but creationism is only a small part of that and then only for some families. My kids know God created the world. They also know the chemistry of DNA and current theories of matter energy. I think these folks at the "New Scientist" magazine are in for a big shock in 15 to 20 years when the big brain jobs s at the JPL and the Salk Institute, etc are dominated by home schooled kids.


20 posted on 12/04/2006 9:00:49 AM PST by azcap
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

I like the chart that shows the estimated h/s population. About time they came up with updated figures, I have been hearing "1.1 million" for years now and I knew it had to be twice that by now.

The first wwave of homeschoolers has graduated college and is starting to make a difference. Within a couple years we're going to see a huge new homeschool demographic; the homeschooled graduates homeschooling their own kids. I expect the curriculumn market to grow and diversify even more as people like me, who know homeschooling works because we were homeschooled, start trying out new things. I think there will be some changes no one is expecting.


21 posted on 12/04/2006 9:02:39 AM PST by JenB
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sopater
You have obviously been indoctrinated yourself by anti-homeschool propaganda.

Wrong. I think homeschooling is great. And I don't like the public perception that homeschoolers are whackos or Christians who don't want their kids to get a proper science education.

22 posted on 12/04/2006 9:03:00 AM PST by antiRepublicrat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

Sorry, I wrote back a little too quickly.


23 posted on 12/04/2006 9:04:01 AM PST by antiRepublicrat
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: LadyNavyVet
I am not a Six-Day-Earther, but I object to the classical Theory of Evolution being taught as if it wasproven Law. If no one was there to see it, and we have no video tape or first hand evidence, it is just a collection of ideas that partially support a conclusion. There may be a more complex theory that incorporates Biblical scholarship and hard science, but it won't be found by a lazy scientific community that has decided that there is no God, and won't even consider alternatives to what "Survival of the Fittest" has become to be viewed as. When did Science stop being about considering all possibilities?
24 posted on 12/04/2006 9:04:23 AM PST by 50sDad (I respect other religions by allowing them the right to worship. But they still are wrong.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Sopater; All
Consequently, there is virtually no government regulation of home-schooling.

Note he uses the word "virtually". I guess that means he doesn't think there are "enough" regulations. Every state (except mine) has homeschool regulations. In some, homeschooling is regulated very heavily.

Also, his description of homeschoolers doesn't fit my state where the Christian/secular ratio is reportedly 50/50.

And here's something curious: He's going on and on about how creationism isn't science. But then he throws in a note about Southern Baptists opposing homosexual activism in public schools. As if the theories pushed today in schools about homosexuality are soooo scientifically sound. LOL.

25 posted on 12/04/2006 9:11:47 AM PST by Tired of Taxes (That's taxes, not Texas. I have no beef with TX. NJ has the highest property taxes in the nation.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: antiRepublicrat

"Wrong. I think homeschooling is great. And I don't like the public perception that homeschoolers are whackos or Christians who don't want their kids to get a proper science education."
___________________________
Right....and some of us just think it's grand when our kids are 1-3 grades ahead of the public school products come "test time".


26 posted on 12/04/2006 9:11:51 AM PST by cowdog77 ("Are there any brave men left in Washington or are they all cowards?")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: 50sDad

I have the same objection. Darwinism used to be considered a theory. They even called it the Theory of Evolution. Now, to some, it is at least as much Holy Writ as the Bible is to me.

I'm teaching my kids that there are competing theories, but when they get to college they're only going to hear one side of the story. I tell them to keep an open mind and consider all the evidence, that understanding God, Creation and our place in the universe is the work of a lifetime, and we won't find all the answers here.


27 posted on 12/04/2006 9:12:49 AM PST by LadyNavyVet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Tired of Taxes

Oops. I should've typed "she". I see the writer's name is "Amanda".


28 posted on 12/04/2006 9:14:45 AM PST by Tired of Taxes (That's taxes, not Texas. I have no beef with TX. NJ has the highest property taxes in the nation.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

From a homeschooler's blog about this article:
http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/SusannahCox/

Nov. 13, 2006 - Negative Press on Homeschooling from Scientists
Posted in Education
Here's a nice little article from NewScientist.com, leading off with a description (completely unbiased, of course) of Patrick Henry College as a doctrinaire breeding ground for scientific illiterates. Writes intrepid investigator Amanda Gefter (after all, she courageously invaded a den of Evangelical Christianism):

"New Scientist investigated how home-schooling, with its considerable legal support, is quietly transforming the landscape of science education in the US, subverting and possibly threatening the public school system that has fought hard against imposing a Christian viewpoint on science teaching." [Emphases mine]

As opposed to the thoroughly godless viewpoint currently imposed on Christians in the public school system, of course. It's their state-given duty to brainwash us.

I don't know about y'all, but I'm getting a bit weary of the "homeschooling as theocon conspiracy" meme. It's been running here in the local papers lately as well.

Were you aware that we homeschoolers are "well organised from the top down, led by groups with strong political ties" and mind-controlled by the likes of "the Discovery Institute, Exodus Mandate, HSLDA and Patrick Henry College"? Now, thanks to Ms. Gefter, you know the truth.

Not that she's bigoted towards Christians, or anything, or would ever try to construct a bogeyman out of homeschooled six-year-olds.

However, we might do well to question Ms. Gefter's investigatory prowess when it's apparent she doesn't even know how to Google. Here are some facts that are just a tad more accurate, and freely available online, from the National Center for Education Statistics [emphases mine]:



Question:
How many children are homeschooled in the United States?

Response:
In 2003, the number of homeschooled students was 1.1 million, an increase from 850,000 in 1999. The percentage of the school-age population who were homeschooled increased from 1.7 percent in 1999 to 2.2 percent in 2003. The majority of homeschooled students received all of their education at home (82 percent), but some attended school up to 25 hours per week. Twelve percent of homeschooled students were enrolled in school less than 9 hours per week, and 6 percent were enrolled between 9 and 25 hours....

...Parents give many different reasons for homeschooling their children. In 2003, the reasons most frequently reported by parents as being “applicable” were concerns about the school environment (e.g., safety, drugs, or negative peer pressure) (85 percent of parents); a desire to provide religious or moral instruction (72 percent); and dissatisfaction with academic instruction (68 percent). As their “most important” reason, parents most often cited concerns about the school environment and a desire to provide religious or moral instruction.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2005). The Condition of Education 2005 (NCES 2005-094) Indicator 3.


Ms. Gefter would have us believe that a mere 2.2 percent of all U.S. school-age children are a huge threat to the stranglehold secular humanism exerts over our public schools. That's not even taking into account that parents often homeschool not primarily for religious reasons, but because their local schools are dismal failures at teaching science--or even reading, writing, and arithmetic, for that matter. Either that, or the unsafe school environment would threaten the welfare of their children. (I mean, for gosh sakes, school kids in the U.S. are being taught how to duck potential shooters nowadays!)

Not all U.S. homeschoolers are Christians, and not all Christian homeschoolers are evangelical. It's safe to say a decent percentage of that oh-so-scary 2.2 percent is not even being taught creationism.

Not that there is a single thing wrong with passing on one's faith to one's children, mind you. It's not yet criminal in the U.S. to believe that God created the heavens and the earth. Frankly, I don't see why it's any of Amanda Gefter's business what our family believes or where my children choose to go to college. There's that old American principle of freedom of association, you know. It must be out of fashion in the U.K. and across Europe. Oh yes, that's right...German homeschoolers are told to put their kids in school or go to jail. That's infinitely preferable to the American way of doing things.

In the interests of full disclosure, I'm going to out myself as a PHC faculty wife. Yep, PHC is where hubby has worked since August. And I must say that it's not surprising at all that PHC students are well-received within the Beltway, especially by a purportedly conservative White House. These kids are brilliant. I guarantee you they could out-reason any ivy league student, given the PC hogwash that's taught on college campuses these days. And in fact, they have.
http://www.phc.edu/news/docs/06242006Media.asp

No wonder Ms. Gefter finds them so intimidating.


29 posted on 12/04/2006 9:18:39 AM PST by Blue_Ridge_Mtn_Geek
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LadyNavyVet
My eldest daughter is at a high-speed "magnet school" and rolls her eyes when the texts contradict grace (or just leave it out, most times.) But she knows the real stories of the Pilgrims, and our Founders. I tell her "yeah, but just write down what they want to hear." (And you ought to hear her moan about how Christmas has become the "Holiday Season". I have innoculated her against the nonsense of the world, and done it well!)
30 posted on 12/04/2006 9:55:59 AM PST by 50sDad (I respect other religions by allowing them the right to worship. But they still are wrong.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

Which is why liberals despise home-school. They want to control the morals of children.


31 posted on 12/04/2006 10:07:37 AM PST by stinkerpot65
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LadyNavyVet
...that understanding God, Creation and our place in the universe is the work of a lifetime, and we won't find all the answers here.

It is indeed a "work of a liftime". I believe that's why we're here, sort of a "proving ground".

As far as home schooling, I certainly would present the THEORY of evolution along with biblical teaching. I firmly believe, that with both, and His gift to us of discernment and "true" discrimination" most people will realize we did not rise out of the primordial ooze.....JMHO.

FMCDH(BITS)

32 posted on 12/04/2006 11:48:54 AM PST by nothingnew (I fear for my Republic due to marxist influence in our government. Open eyes/see)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Sopater
all centred on the idea that God created Earth in six days about 6000 years ago

I wonder if this is a strawman

33 posted on 12/04/2006 11:51:22 AM PST by AppyPappy (If you aren't part of the solution, there is good money to be made prolonging the problem.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sopater
Sounds like evolutionists are scared of the acedemic success of home-schoolers.

Pray for them. It's more of a spiritual problem.

34 posted on 12/04/2006 11:55:57 AM PST by Aquinasfan (When you find "Sola Scriptura" in the Bible, let me know)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: azcap

"From this article you would think that the entire motivation for the American home schooling movement is to teach children creationism and hide them from evolutionary biology."

The guy that wrote the article believes there is no more important issue out there today than the Creation-Evolution debate. To those people it trumps all other things in life and they think that everyone sees it that way.


35 posted on 12/05/2006 10:45:44 AM PST by webstersII
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Sopater; 2Jedismom; FreedomHasACost; mtbrandon49; DarthDilbert; Peanut Gallery; Restorer; ...


The first thing I notice is, what does this graph look like to you?



Not only is the direction going up, but it looks like a hand pointing heavenward. That's interesting. Let's hope the numbers don't plummet. That could be obscene.

I knew NewScientist was doing some sort of "investigation" into homeschooling, but I didn't see this article until now.
These students are part of a large, well-organised movement that is empowering parents to teach their children creationist biology and other unorthodox versions of science at home, all centred on the idea that God created Earth in six days about 6000 years ago.
As Ann Coulter documented in Slander, the media never seems to be sure whether the Religious Right is a pathetic group of gullible, disorganized zealots, or a well-groomed, well-funded and well-represented God militia. Here, it seems, New Scientist takes the latter position.
New Scientist investigated how home-schooling, with its considerable legal support, is quietly transforming the landscape of science education in the US, subverting and possibly threatening the public school system that has fought hard against imposing a Christian viewpoint on science teaching.
Yehaw!
He is appalled by some home-schooling textbooks, especially those on biology that claim they have scientific reasons for rejecting evolution. "They have gross scientific inaccuracies in them," he says.
"Inconceivable!" squeaks Brian Alters. Evidently, he never read Jay Wile's science books to know. But it doesn't matter; any argument against neodarwinian evolution is summarily unscientific in their opinion, so no matter whether it's a scientific reasoning on irreducible complexity, or "God did it" it's unscientific to them.
"They would not be allowed in any public school in the US, and yet these are the books primarily featured in home-schooling bookstores."
Psssst! Brian! Maybe that's why Christians are homeschooling? Ya think?
"If they go on to secular university, home-schoolers are in for some major surprises when they get into an introductory biology class."
Ummm, not really. Most of the homeschool science books explain what evolutionists believe. Mine certainly did. And from science museums to nature books, I was never in doubt about what evolutionists taught. The science behind the water cycle, or photosynthesis, or cellular respiration, is not any different when taught by a creationist than by an evolutionist.
Home-school parents are able to teach their children this way thanks mainly to a group called the Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA)
Actually, we're able to teach because of our God-given right. The HSLDA just helps folks see that more plainly.
This lack of regulation may be skewing science education in US homes, says Alters. "Poll after poll shows that approximately one out of two people in America reject evolution. They think the scientists, teachers and textbooks are wrong," he says. An even higher proportion of home-schooling parents may reject evolution, Alters thinks. "And they're going to be teaching science?"
Newsflash, boys! Check the stats! Homeschoolers can outperform your public schoolers under the desk!

And besides, with just a simple 1.5-2.4 million homeschoolers, how is it that there is such a vast number of citizens who don't buy evolution? That's failure on your part, not just success on ours.
Until recently, most home-schoolers who were learning the evangelical version of science chose to go on to secular universities because such institutions tend to be more academically rigorous than Christian colleges.
From what I understand, private colleges outperform public universities too.
Many such universities today accept home-schooled students, although this was not the case a decade ago.
Some colleges actively seek homeschooled students to add to their population. Probably because they know that homeschool students average higher test scores than public schools.
"Very rarely do universities dig deep into the details to see what books a student has used," says Jay Wile, a PhD in nuclear chemistry from Rochester University in New York who left academia to write creationist textbooks for home-schoolers.
So they do acknowledge Jay. They should have told that Brian guy about him.
It worked. By 2004, PHC students held seven out of 100 internships in the White House, a number even more striking when one considers that only 240 students were enrolled in the entire college.
I don't suppose that would be because these students are so bright. Naaaah.

Nice that they give a note to the other literature in homeschooling, and even a mention of Jason Lisle's book. They cast it as science "modified."

I'm not saying PHC is the way to go. I don't know about them. I do have secondhand knowledge of other "Christian colleges" like Bob Jones and Pensaola. They're legalistic, mechanistic and masochistic. Beware going down that route.
36 posted on 12/06/2006 3:00:40 PM PST by DaveLoneRanger ("I am here to fight evil and exchange good-natured barbs." - The Tick)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sopater; gobucks; mikeus_maximus; JudyB1938; isaiah55version11_0; Elsie; LiteKeeper; AndrewC; ...


You have been pinged because of your interest regarding news, debate and editorials pertaining to the Creation vs. Evolution debate - from the young-earth creationist perspective.
To to get on or off this list (currently the premier list for creation/evolution news!), freep-mail me:
Add me / Remove me



Double-whammy! See my comments on the article, from a homeschooler's perspective, above.
37 posted on 12/06/2006 3:05:40 PM PST by DaveLoneRanger ("I am here to fight evil and exchange good-natured barbs." - The Tick)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CertainInalienableRights

Well, I think the planet is warming, but so is the rest of the solar system.

Makes one wonder how our greenhouse-gases got to the outer planets and their moons.


38 posted on 12/06/2006 3:08:46 PM PST by GourmetDan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: DaveLoneRanger

Good post - thanks!


39 posted on 12/06/2006 3:10:37 PM PST by wouldntbprudent (If you can: Contribute more (babies) to the next generation of God-fearing American Patriots!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: LadyNavyVet

It would be a mistake to teach your kids that scientists are figuring out 'how God did it'.

I teach my kids that scientists *start* with the assumption that there is no God and there pronouncement proceed from there.

Totally unreliable as a 'reasonable' method for determining 'how God did it'.


40 posted on 12/06/2006 3:11:36 PM PST by GourmetDan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Sopater
Such tests cannot, however, reveal whether or not a student understands scientific method, a compulsory subject in public schools but not for home-schoolers.

Considering the number of people who swallow junk science whole I would say that the home schoolers couldn't do any worse then public school does.

Whether it is "a compulsory subject" subject or not obviously the scientific method is not being taught in public schools either.

41 posted on 12/06/2006 3:12:26 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Those who call their fellow citizens Sheeple are just ticked they were not chosen as Shepherds)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GourmetDan
"... there pronouncement proceed from there."

...their pronouncements proceed from there.

Must be my public school edumacation, sheesh.

42 posted on 12/06/2006 3:15:38 PM PST by GourmetDan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: GourmetDan
Must be my public school edumacation, sheesh.

Those who can't do...

43 posted on 12/06/2006 3:16:30 PM PST by Wormwood (the happiest sadist)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: GourmetDan
Makes one wonder how our greenhouse-gases got to the outer planets and their moons.

I told my kids that would happen if they kept leaving the door open. (sarc)
44 posted on 12/06/2006 3:38:42 PM PST by Sopater (Creatio Ex Nihilo)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Harmless Teddy Bear
Such tests cannot, however, reveal whether or not a student understands scientific method, a compulsory subject in public schools but not for home-schoolers.

What do these folks think? That public school kids actually do understand the scientific method better than homeschoolers? I'd like to see one statistic that supports that notion.
45 posted on 12/06/2006 3:41:37 PM PST by Sopater (Creatio Ex Nihilo)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: GourmetDan

Not all scientists start by assuming there is no God. My husband is a scientist. He is very much convinced that science supports the evidence of God, as there is an elegance and order to the universe that cannot be happenstance. There are many more scientists like him. We know several.


46 posted on 12/06/2006 3:49:22 PM PST by LadyNavyVet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: GourmetDan
Makes me want to go smoke a cigar....

A Tabacalera Perdomo Seleccion Estate Vintage 1991..ought to work just fine.

47 posted on 12/06/2006 3:56:07 PM PST by Osage Orange (Every attempt to make war easy & safe will result in humiliation and disaster.-W. T. Sherman)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Sopater

I would too. I personally find that most home schoolers have been taught to think and reason to a far greater degree then their public schooled counterparts.


48 posted on 12/06/2006 3:56:35 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Those who call their fellow citizens Sheeple are just ticked they were not chosen as Shepherds)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: Sopater
According to the US government's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), 72 per cent of home-schooling parents interviewed said that they were motivated by the desire to provide religious and moral instruction. ( from the article)
&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

What a distortion!

This is presented as if religious and moral instruction were the ONLY reason parents chose homeschooling. Parents also choose homeschooling because homeschoolers are academically and socially more successful. They homeschool because it is a healthier way ( emotionally and physically) to raise a child.

By the way, I have never met a fat homeschooler who has been homeschooled from the beginning. In fact, I can't even recall meeting a chubby one!
49 posted on 12/06/2006 4:04:44 PM PST by wintertime (Good ideas win! Why? Because people are not stupid)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: azcap
I think these folks at the "New Scientist" magazine are in for a big shock in 15 to 20 years when the big brain jobs s at the JPL and the Salk Institute, etc are dominated by home schooled kids.

&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&&

The liberal atheists will be shocked when, as you say, the "big brain jobs" are dominated by formerly homeschooled adults.

My religiously observant adult children were homeschooled. They are NORMALLY bright children and not any smarter than the children of the posters on this board. This is what homeschooling accomplished.

All were admitted to college at the ages of 13, 12, and 13. All finished ALL levels of college calculus ( Calc III) by the age of 15 and all their general college courses. The 2 younger graduated from our flagship state university with B.S. degrees in mathematics at the age of 18. The older of the two recently graduated at age 20 with a masters degree in math. ( Plenty of science in these programs.)

The oldest of the 3 would have liked to study math, but is a nationally and internationally ranked athlete. He chose to major in accounting at the age of 15. It suited his heavy training and travel schedule. At 19, just shy of completing his accounting degree, he chose to serve church members in the Baltic States for 2 years. He returned home last year completely fluent in Russian. He is now training and traveling again and completing the last courses for his accounting degree.

All play a musical instrument. All sing in their church and school choruses and choirs. All have studied ballet, modern, and jazz dancing for many years. All are accomplished ballroom dancers. They are active in their church and are active community volunteers through their church.
50 posted on 12/06/2006 4:22:46 PM PST by wintertime (Good ideas win! Why? Because people are not stupid)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-65 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson