Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

District lines in Ohio foil Democrats
The Columbus Dispatch ^

Posted on 12/04/2006 1:33:47 PM PST by Princip. Conservative

A clear majority of Ohioans who voted in the Nov. 7 election preferred a Democratic congressional candidate.

So did Franklin County voters, where Democratic House candidates drew in excess of 10,000 more votes than Republicans.

The result?

While Democrats won nearly 53 percent of the congressional votes statewide, only about 39 percent of Ohioans will be represented next year by Democrats in Congress.

That’s the biggest so-called "wrong winner" disparity in the country from the 2006 midterm elections, says the nonpartisan FairVote.org.

Aided by gerrymandering — the drawing of districts to favor one party — Republicans captured 11 of the state’s 18 congressional seats, assuming that GOP Rep. Deborah Pryce, of Upper Arlington, survives a recount in the 15 th District. If she does, all three House members representing Franklin County will be Republicans.

(Excerpt) Read more at columbusdispatch.com ...


TOPICS: Editorial; Politics/Elections; US: Ohio
KEYWORDS: electioncongress; electionushouse
One-sided article, making it look like the GOP is a vote-stealer. They failed to mention that the GOP received far fewer seats than votes in states like New York, Maryland, Oregon and Massachusetts. In Massachusetts, the Dems are so selfish, they keep all 10 districts to themselves, even though the GOP easily gets enough of the vote to qualify for at least one seat out of 10. But does that make headlines? Huh-uh.
1 posted on 12/04/2006 1:33:48 PM PST by Princip. Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

If we got rid of gerrymandering altogether, the Dems would be outnumbered 2 to 1.


2 posted on 12/04/2006 1:35:47 PM PST by Brilliant
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

Dude... don't you know that gerrymandering is only evil and racist when Republicans do it? :)


3 posted on 12/04/2006 1:36:21 PM PST by pnh102
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

Sounds like they are planting seeds for proportional representation. But then Dems would get even less.


4 posted on 12/04/2006 1:37:49 PM PST by Michael.SF. (Note: Sell Diebold Stock.................NOW!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

No mention of the umpteen decades old 'Rat gerrymandering in my state of TN. The Republicans have received a majority of the vote in legislative and federal elections for a decade, and we get a minority of the seats. Consider Ohio a correction for TN disenfranchisement.


5 posted on 12/04/2006 1:38:40 PM PST by fieldmarshaldj (Cheney X -- Destroying the Liberal Democrat Traitors By Any Means Necessary -- Ya Dig ? Sho 'Nuff.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

Well, it's still true that each district is represented by the party chosen by a majority of their people.

Some say gerrymandering is actually better, because it can tend to put people of like mind together, so that the average representative is BETTER representative of the people in the district, having been elected by a larger majority of people in the district.

What's better, having every representative elected by 50.1% of the people, or having every representative elected by 60% of the people?


6 posted on 12/04/2006 1:40:11 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative
says the nonpartisan FairVote.org.

I stopped reading right there. There's no such thing as nonpartisan. Such a term is quite often used to stifle dissent.

7 posted on 12/04/2006 1:41:45 PM PST by rhombus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CharlesWayneCT

"What's better, having every representative elected by 50.1% of the people, or having every representative elected by 60% of the people?"

I think the main point is that redistricting is used by both sides. There will have to be bilateral dismantling of the system or it will never die. The Republicans win in Texas, while the Democrats win in California and so forth - thanks to redistricting.


8 posted on 12/04/2006 1:45:03 PM PST by Princip. Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

In Texas, it was the exact opposite with the GOP getting nearly 60% of the vote but having far less than half of the congressional delegation. And when Tom Delay fixed it, the Dems cried bloody murder and that dipwad in Austin indicted him in recrimination. Apparently, the whole goose-gander thing is lost on the idiots in Cleveland.


9 posted on 12/04/2006 1:52:59 PM PST by bpjam (Don't Blame Me. I Voted GOP.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

The problem in Massachusetts isn't the lines, it's that we can't find anyone worthwhile to run.


10 posted on 12/04/2006 1:54:46 PM PST by HostileTerritory
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

It's wrong wherever it's done. And yes, the article could have pointed out that a similar gerrymandering is done by the Democrats in numerous states, including my own California (54% vote for Kerry, yet the state Leftistlature is about 65% Democrat).


11 posted on 12/04/2006 1:55:13 PM PST by pogo101
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative
Gosh, the press implies an injustice in Ohio when the majority votes for the 'rats but more Republicans go to the Congress...

Where were these jerks when the same thing was happening for years in Texas? Oh, I forgot: the Democrats BENEFITTED from that, so the press ignored it.

12 posted on 12/04/2006 2:01:50 PM PST by Recovering_Democrat (I am SO glad to no longer be associated with the party of Dependence on Government!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

It's incredible Republicans still control the Ohio state house and state senate.


13 posted on 12/04/2006 2:03:43 PM PST by LdSentinal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: pogo101

I don't know how "wrong" it is. You have to draw the lines somewhere, and if it's completely random it is possible that, if the state is 60-40 republican, EVERY SINGLE representative could end up a republican. It all would depend on how segregated the population is.

So the question is, are we better represented if districts are governed by self-segregation of the population, or if we districts are governed by chosen segregation by the legislature?

If the nation picked it's entire representative set based on correctly balancing the political parties based on total votes received, we'd need a couple of green party and other 3rd-party representatives, and we'd probably almost always end up with a closely divided house given the way the political parties have divided their issue base.


14 posted on 12/04/2006 2:07:26 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

The real question is, how many democrats have a democrat representative, and how many republicans have a republican representative, vs the opposite.

My bet is that a majority of the democrats in Ohio are represented by a democrat who reflects their point of view.


15 posted on 12/04/2006 2:09:26 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

Tell you what, let's get rid of the dead voters, the illegal alien voters, the rest of the fraudulent voters and require photo I.D. when you vote, and then, maybe, I'll worry about gerrymandering in Ohio.


16 posted on 12/04/2006 2:11:21 PM PST by Toddsterpatriot (If you agree with EPI, you're not a conservative!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CharlesWayneCT

If you don't see what's wrong with a political party's drawing ridiculous-looking lines (traveling dozens of miles down highways, then ballooning out, then repeating the process, etc.) that cram as many opposing-party voters into as few districts as possible, all to maximize said majority-party's numbers of seats, then there's nothing for us to discuss. It's self-evident to me.

What I favor is a system whereby district lines follow geographical (rivers, hill ranges, etc.) and historical (city and county lines) boundaries to the extent possible, and that ignore not only race but also political party.


17 posted on 12/04/2006 2:22:31 PM PST by pogo101
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: bpjam

Luckily the USSC refused to hear Texas case against the redistricting. They would have to undo years of gerrymandering to get minority districts and that would never do.......would it? LOL


18 posted on 12/04/2006 2:29:56 PM PST by OldFriend (FALLEN HERO JEFFREY TOCZYLOWSKI, REST IN PEACE)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: pogo101

I'm just saying that your method still draws discriminatory lines, you are just using a different method of discrimination.

In your method, if I live too close to a city, I'm toast, because the city is going to overwhelm my vote and vote democrat, whereas if I live in the country I get a republican to represent me.

I don't like gerrymandering, especially with the tools we have today to do it so "precisely", but you have to draw the lines somewhere.

You could of course do a statewide election and apportion representatives, except that would be illegal.

The real problem isn't gerrymandering, it's that we don't have a representative for each 30-50 thousand people anymore. IF we did, it wouldn't really matter much where you drew the lines.


19 posted on 12/04/2006 2:32:23 PM PST by CharlesWayneCT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

Tough sh!t, the media didn't give a damn about this when Texas was vastly overrepresented by Dems.


20 posted on 12/04/2006 2:42:22 PM PST by Diddle E. Squat (An easy 12-team BCS bowls-based playoff can be implemented by next year. See my homepage.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative
Gerrymandering saved me. For a long time Ohio's 3rd district was so Democratic that some years the Republicans didn't even run anyone against Tony Hall. I even voted for the Natural Law party kooks so I could say I didn't vote for Hall.

Then Ohio lost a seat in the 2000 census. The Dems agreed that it would be Traficant's district that would be eliminated. Then the Republicans started snipping and cutting "just a little", dumped some of (Dem) Dayton out of the 3rd district and added some of the (Republican) outer suburbs so for now the district is mostly (but not absolutely safe) Republican. The Dems in the state house howled about being cheated.

21 posted on 12/04/2006 2:56:16 PM PST by KarlInOhio (Hey Kerry, What part of showing heels and ass is a winning strategy in Iraq?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative
The Republicans win in Texas, while the Democrats win in California and so forth - thanks to redistricting.

Before the redistricing in 2004, the DemocRATS controlled 60% of the Texas congressional delegation despite getting only 40% of the vote. What was fair about that? Now Republicans have 19 out of 32 seats. That's pretty much in line with how people in Texas actually voted.

22 posted on 12/04/2006 3:27:17 PM PST by Paleo Conservative (Karl Rove isn't magnificent.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: HostileTerritory

"The problem in Massachusetts isn't the lines, it's that we can't find anyone worthwhile to run."

Are you sure? I find that a little hard to believe, even in hardcore Dem Massachusetts.


23 posted on 12/04/2006 10:21:09 PM PST by Princip. Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: fieldmarshaldj

In literally EVERY state (and especially places like Washington) state races are largely decided by corrupt, concentrated parasite nests (cities).


24 posted on 12/04/2006 10:26:27 PM PST by Lancey Howard
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Princip. Conservative

Well, there are more factors than that. We don't have any chunks of Republican territory big enough to form a district, so every district is at least competitive for the Democrats, if not outright favoring them.

We've been decimated in the legislature. We have no bench. Conservatives run in the Democrat primaries because they have a better chance of getting elected to higher office. In the past, conservatives (albeit pro-union) ran the legislatures. No one knows what our party stands for because the Democrats stand for every conceivable opposing view.

So we have no bench, and after many years of failure to advance against Democrats, no good candidate thinks it's a good use of his money or name.


25 posted on 12/05/2006 6:02:37 AM PST by HostileTerritory
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

Comment #26 Removed by Moderator

To: Princip. Conservative

What a bunch of psychobabble. Sore Loosers once again. Thank God the GOP still controls the Ohio House and the Ohio Senate. This sounds like the same argument against the Electoral College.


27 posted on 12/05/2006 6:51:08 AM PST by GOP_Lady
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #28 Removed by Moderator

To: Princip. Conservative

the new gravitas:

"wrong winner"


When democrats gerrymander, its a right winner despite the same lying with statistics argument.


This paper must have hearalded the 4% unemployment of Bill Clinton and was "WE ARE DOOMED" with the 4% unemployment under GWBush.


29 posted on 12/05/2006 7:47:36 AM PST by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: TonyRo76

You'd pay them a small sum, so they would still have to work for a living (or at least small enough so it wouldn't be a career), and the house would have to come up with ways to to their business better. We have the technology so they don't all have to be in the same room in order to meet together.

You really need to have representatives for small numbers of people in order to AVOID the factions that we have today. The parties would be weaker if they had to get 2000 elections taken care of instead of only 435.

Note that, as it is, there can be surprises in house elections because it IS hard to keep track of even a few hundred thousand voters, but imagine trying to track 10,000 voters in 2000 places -- polls would be almost meaningless, it would be much easier for people who simply are hard-working citizens would good ideas to actually GET ELECTED (because you could literally knock on EVERY door in your district before the election).

I love state elections precisely because you just have to reach 20,000 voters, and so money isn't quite as important.


30 posted on 12/05/2006 7:47:36 AM PST by CharlesWayneCT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

Comment #31 Removed by Moderator

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson