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Sub rescue vehicle trapped underwater
AuBC News ^ | Tuesday, December 5, 2006. 3:10pm (AEDT)

Posted on 12/04/2006 8:55:50 PM PST by james500

A rescue effort is under way for two people trapped inside a submarine rescue vehicle off the coast of Perth.

A civilian diving contractor was testing the Australian Submarine Rescue Vehicle (ASRV) in deep water last night when its winching system failed, preventing it from being able to return to the surface.

The vessel was lowered to the sea bed and is currently sitting in 130 metres of water.

The Defence Department says the two people trapped inside are in no immediate danger, as the vehicle remains attached to the mother ship by a secondary cable which provides power and communication.

Rough weather conditions are hampering the recovery of the vessel and the frigate HMAS Anzac (FFH 150) and navy divers are on stand-by.


TOPICS: Australia/New Zealand; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: australian; australiansubmarine; submarine; submarinerescue
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To: george76

Excellent. Thanks.


21 posted on 12/04/2006 9:42:52 PM PST by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life)
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To: george76; Doohickey
Thanks for the ping, George!

Must explain on thing.....I wasn't a Bubblehead. Doohickey was though. He tolerates me on his Ping list as a joint ops appreciation thing. And he wants me to buy beer.

We do have something in common though. We both lived in a tube. His under the sea and mine in the air.

VQ-1 Danang.
22 posted on 12/04/2006 9:44:36 PM PST by BIGLOOK (Keelhauling is a sensible solution to mutiny.)
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To: Liberty Valance; Aussie Dasher

Good news for our friends.


23 posted on 12/04/2006 9:46:34 PM PST by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: Brucifer

24 posted on 12/04/2006 9:49:27 PM PST by Westlander (Unleash the Neutron Bomb)
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To: FreedomPoster

If!!!

They abandon the vehical and use the submarine escape breathing appliance they can make it to the surface safely with No decompression sickness.

It would be shameful if the rescuers did do design in an escape for theselves.

HO HO HO all the way to the surface. (an i an't talkin bout no Sante Clause)

Steinke hood
A Steinke hood, named for its inventor, is a device designed to aid escape from a sunken submarine, essentially an inflatable life jacket with a hood that completely encloses the wearer's head, trapping a bubble of breathing air. An advancement over its predecessor, the Momsen lung, it was standard equipment in all submarines of the United States Navy throughout the Cold War period. The US Navy plans to replace Steinke hoods in all US submarines with escape suits called Submarine Escape and Immersion Equipment by 2005.


25 posted on 12/04/2006 9:49:49 PM PST by kennyboy509 (Ha! I kill me!)
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To: george76

Angels by their side.


26 posted on 12/04/2006 9:51:23 PM PST by Westlander (Unleash the Neutron Bomb)
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To: BIGLOOK

I always enjoy reading your posts.

Thanks.


27 posted on 12/04/2006 9:54:45 PM PST by george76 (Ward Churchill : Fake Indian, Fake Scholarship, and Fake Art)
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To: kennyboy509
Tell me how this would work. At approx 130 meters, the pressure would be around 190 lbs/inch on the body...

It's late and I've had a few so be gentle... LOL

28 posted on 12/04/2006 9:59:16 PM PST by in the Arena
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To: james500

good news:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200612/s1804781.htm

Men rescued after 13 hours trapped in sub

Divers have rescued two men who were trapped in a submarine rescue vessel off the coast of Perth.

The Australian Submarine Rescue Vehicle (ASRV) was conducting a certification trial about 15 nautical miles west of Wanneroo when one of the cables attaching it to the mother ship snapped.

The vessel was lowered 130 metres to the sea floor, where the men remained for almost 13 hours.

The secondary cable attached to the mother ship was used to winch the vessel to just below the surface, where divers swam down and brought the men to the surface.

The two men are receiving medical treatment


29 posted on 12/04/2006 10:01:39 PM PST by james500
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To: james500
OK, when did Australia get a Navy and why wasn't I informed?

Give those guys some empty beer kegs and it will go to their heads.
30 posted on 12/04/2006 10:05:56 PM PST by Herakles (Diversity is code word for anti-white racism)
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To: james500

Can anyone explain why the sub was winched to just below the surface and then the divers brought the two submariners out?


31 posted on 12/04/2006 10:25:06 PM PST by BradyLS (DO NOT FEED THE BEARS!)
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To: george76
Always appreciate 'Good News' posts. We can't get enough of 'em.

That successful rescue is worthy of a BZ for all involved.

Post as often all the good since the MSM will print as often all the bad....with malice for all.
32 posted on 12/04/2006 10:27:00 PM PST by BIGLOOK (Keelhauling is a sensible solution to mutiny.)
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To: BradyLS
Buoyancy and weight. The crew is valued and the sub is materiel.
33 posted on 12/04/2006 10:33:18 PM PST by BIGLOOK (Keelhauling is a sensible solution to mutiny.)
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To: Liberty Valance

Thanks for the ping. Glad to see a happy ending.


34 posted on 12/04/2006 10:55:51 PM PST by Diver Dave
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To: BradyLS

Basically because it was safer to do that.

The most dangerous part of the extraction is when the vehicle is lifted out of the water onto the deck. It is no longer supported by the water and no longer has bouyancy to help with its weight - and so if a cable is going to break that's when it is most likely to happen. So they got them out before risking it.


35 posted on 12/04/2006 11:50:26 PM PST by naturalman1975 ("America was under attack. Australia was immediately there to help." - John Winston Howard)
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To: FreeInWV
No worries. 130 metres ain't all that deep.

Scuba at 400 feet? That was about the maximum dive depth for a World War II sub.

36 posted on 12/05/2006 1:08:18 AM PST by PAR35
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To: rottndog
Why? What has he ever done to you?


37 posted on 12/05/2006 7:02:31 AM PST by BlueMondaySkipper (The quickest way of ending a war is to lose it. - George Orwell)
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To: BlueMondaySkipper

Cheer up sleepy Jean...


38 posted on 12/05/2006 7:12:43 AM PST by rottndog (WOOF!!!)
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To: BradyLS
What about the bends if they try to do a straight ascent from that depth?

They wouldn't ascend straight from that depth. They would do a staged decompression ascent, stopping at points along the way up. At what points, and for how long, would depend on their time outside the sub at depth, the gases they're breathing, etc.
39 posted on 12/05/2006 10:13:36 AM PST by Bellows
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To: PAR35
Scuba at 400 feet? That was about the maximum dive depth for a World War II sub.

You can't compare the two. A WWII sub was limited by its hull's ability to withstand pressures at depth. The human body is mostly liquid and is essentially non-compressible. To give you an idea, the free diving (no scuba - just hold your breath) world record in the "no limit" category (using a weighted sled to descend and inflation device to ascend) stands at 183 meters. That's on a single held breath. That record is not limited by the body's ability to withstand the pressure, only the person's ability to hold his/her breath for what must seem like an eternity. For scuba at that depth the issue is breathing gas. We've figured that out. The scuba world record is somewhere north of 300 meters. It takes only minutes to descend, but at that depth it takes several hours to ascend, due to the need to do multiple decompression stops.
40 posted on 12/05/2006 10:23:35 AM PST by Bellows
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