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Sugar
Jan 11, 07 | Self

Posted on 01/11/2007 9:09:41 PM PST by PizzaDriver

Today Bill OReilly blamed "Sugar" for our obseity. HE, like most Americans, has confused High Fruitose Corn Syrup with Sugar.

In the Days when Soft Drinks and Fast Food actually used Sugar, 12 ounces was a BIG Pepsi. When Donut Batter included real Sugar, a box of a Dozen was expected to sevre 6 or more.

We got Full, not FAT.

Then Cuba fell to Castro. Industry discovered "Corn sweeteners".

Today, Government and the Media call "High Fruitose Corn Syrup" SUGAR. Then they blame "SUGAR" for our Obeisity.


TOPICS: Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: azucar; cornsyrup; dextrose; fat; fruct; fructose; junkscience; maltose; politicalagenda; sucre; sugar; sweet
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Try a 12 ounce bottle of Mexican Coca-Cola. It will be MORE filling, than a 20 Ounce US Coke. You'll find the import in your market's Ethic Foods Section.
1 posted on 01/11/2007 9:09:42 PM PST by PizzaDriver
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To: PizzaDriver

Sugar's not responsible for our obesity.

Spoons are.


2 posted on 01/11/2007 9:10:30 PM PST by SiliconValleyGuy
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To: PizzaDriver

I understand corn syrup makes us much hungrier sooner, too. True?


3 posted on 01/11/2007 9:11:14 PM PST by sine_nomine (The United States...shall protect each of them against invasion. Article IV, 4. US Constition)
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To: PizzaDriver

We're all Fruct!


4 posted on 01/11/2007 9:12:17 PM PST by who_would_fardels_bear
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To: Blue Jays

There is about sixteen calories in a measured teaspoon of sugar comprised virtually of pure carbohydrates.


5 posted on 01/11/2007 9:13:14 PM PST by Blue Jays (Rock Hard, Ride Free)
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To: who_would_fardels_bear

We're all Fruct!


Here it is 12.13AM and you have ALREADY won the Freeper Line of the Day Award.

No on will beat that one today.


6 posted on 01/11/2007 9:14:55 PM PST by Chickensoup (If you don't go to the holy war, the holy war will come to you.)
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To: PizzaDriver
Or you could just have a big ole' glass of Georgia Sweet Tea (one part tea, one part sugar).
7 posted on 01/11/2007 9:16:10 PM PST by msnimje (You simply cannot be Christian and Pro-Abortion.)
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To: PizzaDriver

Sitting on "our" A*&es complaining how hard it is to lose weight and stuffing "our" mouths is what causes obesity! And, stuffing them with proportionately MORE sugar could be part of the problem, too....which is why there is so much Type 2 diabetes these days....even among the younger set.


8 posted on 01/11/2007 9:16:13 PM PST by goodnesswins (We need to cure Academentia)
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To: who_would_fardels_bear
Fruct in syrup.
9 posted on 01/11/2007 9:17:08 PM PST by msnimje (You simply cannot be Christian and Pro-Abortion.)
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To: PizzaDriver

You should try the Krispy Kreme diet! You'll shed pounds faster than Teddy Kennedy's obligatory 3 martini-lunch!


10 posted on 01/11/2007 9:17:45 PM PST by Blue Highway
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To: PizzaDriver
High fructose corn syrup and sugar (sucrose) are made up of the same two ingredients in almost identical proportions. If one is bad for you then the other must be also. They possess the same satiety profiles and their glycemic indexes are essentially identical.

I agree that coke made with sugar is much better than one made with high fructose corn syrup. Other than that there is no real difference. People get fat today because they consume more calories, mostly from carbohydrates, than they burn. Both you and O'Reilly are confused on this one.

11 posted on 01/11/2007 9:18:35 PM PST by Mase (Save me from the people who would save me from myself!)
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To: PizzaDriver

Bush


12 posted on 01/11/2007 9:19:08 PM PST by Fester Chugabrew
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To: PizzaDriver

A basic understanding of chemistry (beyond what most people have, or really should have) shows that this whole HFCS thing is a total hoax. It behaves in your body exactly the way sugar does.


13 posted on 01/11/2007 9:22:01 PM PST by Rodney King (No, we can't all just get along.)
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To: Mase
You are correct....HFCS is just a bit more glucose of about 55% compared to sucrose which is 50% or so....metabolized the same...and one does not fill you up more then the other....HFCS is used mainly cause it is easier in the processing of foodstuffs and does not crystallize like sugar does....refined carbs of any type inducing an immediate insulin response and fat laden foods mainly in the baked goods dept are the real obesity problems....plus fat ass kids playing video games instead of exercising
14 posted on 01/11/2007 9:26:02 PM PST by NorCalRepub
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To: Chickensoup

It was a great line.


15 posted on 01/11/2007 9:36:15 PM PST by writer33 (Rush Limbaugh walks in the footsteps of giants: George Washington, Ronald Reagan and Noah Webster.)
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To: who_would_fardels_bear

LOL


16 posted on 01/11/2007 9:39:15 PM PST by wafflehouse (When in danger, When in doubt, Run in circles, Scream and Shout!)
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To: Mase

Fructose has many negatives along with the one benefit of having a lower glycemic index (no blood sugar spikes for diabetics). Fructose does not stimulate any leptin or insulin so there is no satiety or food satisfaction (one will therefore keep on eating it). Fructose does not metabolize like sugar which can be "burned" in your muscles in about thiry minutes. Fructose must go directly to the liver where it is rendered into fat. Fructose also chelates with iron in the gut and facilitates extra absorption of iron (which is associated with so many horrible afflictions that you really do not want to hear about them all....cancer, heart attacks, glaucoma, diabetes etc. Sugar is bad enough but fructose evolved for the purpose of fattening up little furry critters to survive the winter and disperse fruit seeds the next summer. The average american consumes fifty five pounds of fructose per year and that makes it lethal in that amount.


17 posted on 01/11/2007 9:46:38 PM PST by kruss3 (Kruss3@yahoo.com)
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To: kruss3

But wait, I thought no one will be able to afford to eat if corn is used to make ethanol instead of fructose syrup!

Decisions, decisions...


18 posted on 01/11/2007 9:53:29 PM PST by hlmencken3 (Originalist on the the 'general welfare' clause? No? NOT an originalist!)
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To: kruss3

.....all true however HFCS actually has only 40-45% fructose whereas sugar has 50%......glucose of course making up the other percentages of each....and yes the glucose can be burned in the muscles in the form of glycogen but for most people who don't exercise, the glycogen levels are full and thus no matter which saccaride it is....it will be turned into fat none the less


19 posted on 01/11/2007 9:54:50 PM PST by NorCalRepub
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To: PizzaDriver

Here http://www.marshmallowpeeps.com/
is the link to the "Satan of Sugar"

I surely do like that Creme Brule, though. Does that make me evil?


20 posted on 01/11/2007 10:10:59 PM PST by Spruce
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To: kruss3
Do you understand that both fructose and glucose are found in sugar and high fructose corn syrup? The chemical structure of fructose and glucose in hydrolyzed sugar is the same as the fructose and glucose in high fructose corn syrup. No one consumes straight fructose.

You are wrong to say that fructose does not stimulate insulin. Fructose is metabolized by a different pathway than glucose but the liver converts fructose into glucose. Once that glucose enters the blood it will stimulate insulin. Satiation is mediated in the blood so once that fructose is converted to glucose, satiation will occur. The satiation profiles of sugar and high fructose corn syrup are almost identical.

The liver does not render fructose into fat. It converts it to glucose. Any glucose that is needed for immediate energy is taken. The rest is converted into glycogen and stored in the muscles and liver. When the glycogen reserves are full the body will convert the excess into depot fat. Both glucose and fructose enter the Krebs cycle at the same level as 3x2 carbon fragments.

As for fructose and iron chleation.....good grief!.....where to begin. You must have come across one of the many internet nutritional charlatans to really believe all that nonsense. Sounds to me like someone fed lab rats straight fructose in amounts that have no relationship to real world human consumption and then marveled at the rats inability to deal with the overdose and the resulting maladies.

If your unfounded (and goofy) fears were true we'd be a nation of sick people instead of living longer and healthier lives than we ever have. A good book on basic nutrition would help you avoid this kind of nonsense in the future. There are a lot of people calling themselves doctor on the internet who never passed basic chemistry and nutrition. Beware of what they tell you and especially the books they're trying to sell.

21 posted on 01/11/2007 10:13:13 PM PST by Mase (Save me from the people who would save me from myself!)
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To: Mase

Fructose is a monosaccharide (one simple sugar)and sucrose is a disaccharide(two). Their gylcemic indices are different. Fructose is very low compared to sucrose.
I'm betting on the research that implicates fructose with obesity and other problems with blood lipids.


22 posted on 01/11/2007 10:26:05 PM PST by A Strict Constructionist (Machiavelli can be useful at times)
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To: kruss3
Sugar is bad enough but fructose evolved for the purpose of fattening up little furry critters to survive the winter and disperse fruit seeds the next summer.

A carb evolved? That's funny!

23 posted on 01/11/2007 10:26:17 PM PST by Toddsterpatriot (There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it.)
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To: PizzaDriver

I agree that sugar is more filling- I can't finish a full can/bottle of pop made with sugar. I cut out corn syrup when I realized that I was allergic to corn. I've lost weight and feel healthier.

Corn and soy are used to fatten livestock. I don't need fattening.


24 posted on 01/11/2007 10:45:42 PM PST by conservative cat
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To: Toddsterpatriot

Symbiosis and co-evolution.

Unless you're one of those creationists?


25 posted on 01/11/2007 10:50:25 PM PST by JerseyHighlander
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To: PizzaDriver

I understand Dr. Pepper in the area of Dallas, Tx is much different (better) than Dr. Pepper that gets distributed nationwide because it is made with real sugar.


26 posted on 01/11/2007 11:05:48 PM PST by Lexinom (Duncan Hunter 2008 - www.peacethroughstrengthpac.com)
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To: Lexinom
I understand Dr. Pepper in the area of Dallas, Tx is much different (better)... because it is made with real sugar.

Not Dallas. Dublin, Texas.

Dublin Dr Pepper

27 posted on 01/11/2007 11:13:48 PM PST by TheSarce ("America is NOT what's wrong with this world." --Donald Rumsfeld)
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To: sine_nomine
Sort of. High Fructose Corn syrup does not trigger the full mechanism. This enables you to drink that 44 ounce Super Big Gulp and say "I should have got a 64 ounce Double Gulp." Actually, this trick on the full mechanism enables the food marketeers to sell their triple burger with cheeze and a super sized fries and then sell a larger soda because their customer will not feel full because of the soda. The soda also helps the customer wash down more food. Some restaurants offer all you can drink soda (especially in pizza restaurants where soda helps to cut the edge off the high fat content of the pizza). If one were to consume a 44 ounce high fructose corn syrup soda, they would have consumed 600 calories. Some people can down such a soda as if it was water and not even feel it. For instance, a Wendy's triple burger with cheeze has 1040 calories. Wendy's fries (biggie) has 470 calories and a large 32 ounce coke, 310 calories. Total calories, 1820. An average man requires about 2200 calories a day. That feast at Wendy's would come 380 short of the daily limit. Eat a 380 calorie McDonald's Sausage McMuffin and you have done it. For those who are interested, it takes it takes 3500 extra calories to add a pound of weight.
28 posted on 01/11/2007 11:18:37 PM PST by jonrick46
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To: jonrick46
That is interesting. You are a nutritionist, or else a good avocational student of nutrition. Thanks for this good information.

Would we not be better off with the smaller burgers and drinks of the 50's and 60's? Better tasting, less of it? I'm a 70's child, but I don't remember in documentaries and news from that earlier era seeing a large number of obese people. One of my elders would have to confirm that.

29 posted on 01/11/2007 11:48:09 PM PST by Lexinom (Duncan Hunter 2008 - www.peacethroughstrengthpac.com)
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To: PizzaDriver


Just one article found on dogpile.com about fructose/high fructose.
By Nancy Appleton, Ph.D.

The consumption of fructose (corn syrup) has risen considerably in the general population within recent years. In 1980 the average person ate 39 pounds of fructose and 84 pounds of sucrose. In 1994 the average person ate 66 pounds of sucrose and 83 pounds of fructose. This 149 pounds is approximately 19% of the average person's diet.

This increase is due to several factors. There was a decreased use of cane and beet sugar (sucrose) in processed foods and a wide spread use of corn syrup due to economics. Corn is much cheaper and twice as sweet as table sugar. It is absorbed only 40% as quickly as glucose and causes only a modest rise in blood sugar.

A few years ago the medical community revealed that there was good news for diabetics. Many people had previously known that table sugar (sucrose) was not a healthy food for diabetics because it raised their blood sugar levels above normal.

Since diabetics have a hard time maintaining healthy blood sugar levels, doctors counseled diabetics not to eat sugar. The new revelation was that diabetics could eat fructose because fructose did not raise their blood sugar level extremely high. So far so good, but there is more.

Many doctors were recommending fructose instead of glucose. Today fructose is not only being used by some diabetics but it is used for a variety of foods, drinks and confectionery around the world. It is used for candies for diabetics, desserts for weight watchers, drinks for the sportsman and jelly for the health conscious.

The medical community recommended it because of a low increase in glucose in the blood. The scientists did not look at other factors in the body when a person eats sugar. Let's look at some of these factors now.

1. Fructose has no enzymes, vitamins, and minerals and robs the body of its micronutrient treasures in order to assimilate itself for physiological use.

Fructose browns food more readily (Maillard reaction) than with glucose. This may seem like a good idea, but it is not.

The Maillard reaction, a browning reaction, happens with any sugar. With fructose it happens seven times faster with than glucose, results in a decrease in protein quality and a toxicity of protein in the body.

This is due to the loss of amino acid residues and decreased protein digestibility. Maillard products can inhibit the uptake and metabolism of free amino acids and other nutrients such as zinc and some advanced Maillard products have mutagenic and/or carcinogenic properties. The Maillard reactions between proteins and fructose, glucose, and other sugars may play a role in aging and in some clinical complications of diabetes.
2. Research showed that in subjects that had healthy glucose tolerance and those that had unhealthy glucose tolerance, fructose caused a general increase in both the total serum cholesterol and in the low density lipoproteins (LDL) in most of the subjects. This puts a person at risk for heart disease.
3. Another study showed that the very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) increased without an apparent change in high density lipoproteins (HDL). The VLDL and the LDL should be as low as possible and the HDL should be as high as possible.
4. There is a significant increase in the concentration of uric acid that is dependent on the amount of fructose digested. After glucose no significant change occurs. An increase in uric acid can be an indicator of heart disease.
5. Fructose ingestion in humans results in increases in blood lactic acid, especially in patients with preexisting acidotic conditions such as diabetes, postoperative stress, or uremia. The significance to human health is that extreme elevations cause metabolic acidosis and can result in death.
6. Fructose is absorbed primarily in the jejunum and metabolized in the liver. Fructose is converted to fatty acids by the liver at a greater rate than is glucose. When consumed in excess of dietary glucose, the liver cannot convert all of the excess of fructose in the system and it may be malabsorbed. What escapes conversion and being absorbed into the cells may be thrown out in the urine. Diarrhea can be a consequence.
7. Fructose interacts with oral contraceptives and elevates insulin levels in women on "the pill."
8. Fructose reduced the affinity of insulin for its receptor. This is the first step for glucose to enter a cell and be metabolized. As a result, the body needs to pump out more insulin, to handle the same amount of glucose.
9. Fructose consistently produced higher kidney calcium concentrations than did glucose in a study with rats. Fructose generally induced greater urinary concentrations of phosphorus and magnesium and lowered urinary pH compared with glucose.

The balance of minerals in the body is very important for the function of vitamins, enzymes and other body function. When the minerals are out of the right relationship, the body chemistry suffers. The presence of diarrhea might be the cause of decreased absorption of minerals.
10. Fructose-fed subjects lose minerals. They had higher fecal excretions of iron and magnesium than did subjects fed sucrose. Apparent iron, magnesium, calcium, and zinc balances tended to be more negative during the fructose feeding period as compared to balances during the sucrose feeding period.
11. A study of 25 patients with functional bowel disease showed that pronounced gastrointestinal distress may be provoked by malabsorption of small amounts of fructose.
12. Many times fructose and sorbitol are substituted for glucose in parenteral nutrition (intervenious feeding, IV). This can have severe consequences with people with hereditary fructose intolerance, a congenital disorder affecting one in 21,000. A European doctor declared: "Fructose and sorbitol containing infusion fluids have no further place in our hospital pharmacies."
13. There is significant evidence that high sucrose diets may alter intracellular metabolism, which in turn facilitates accelerated aging through oxidative damage. Scientists found that the rats given fructose had more undesirable cross?linking changes in the collagen of their skin than in the other groups.

These changes are also thought to be markers for aging. The scientists say that it is the fructose molecule in the sucrose, not the glucose, which plays the larger problem.
14. Fructose is not metabolized the same as other sugars. Instead of being converted to glucose which the body uses, it is removed by the liver.
15. Because it is metabolized by the liver, fructose does not cause the pancreas to release insulin the way it normally does. Fructose converts to fat more than any other sugar. This may be one of the reasons Americans continue to get fatter.

Fructose raises serum triglycerides significantly. As a left-handed sugar, fructose digestion is very low. For complete internal conversion of fructose into glucose and acetates, it must rob ATP energy stores from the liver.
16. Fructose inhibits copper metabolism. A deficiency in copper leads to bone fragility, anemia, defects of the connective tissue, arteries, and bone, infertility, heart arrhythmias, high cholesterol levels, heart attacks, and an inability to control blood sugar levels.

It seems that the magnitude of the deleterious effects varies depending on such factors as age, sex, baseline glucose, insulin, and triglyceride concentrations, the presence of insulin resistance, and the amount of dietary fructose consumed.

Some people are more sensitive to fructose. They include hypertensive, hyperinsulinemic, hypertriglyceridemic, non?insulin dependent diabetic people, people with functional bowel disease and postmenopausal women.

There is a continuing increase in sugar consumption in the United States. We now eat 153 pounds of sugar per person per year.

This increase is mostly in the form of fructose. From the research presented, it seems that this increase is going to have a negative influence on our health.

Nancy Appleton, Ph.D. is a clinical nutritionist, researcher, lecturer, and author of Lick the Sugar, Healthy Bones, Heal Yourself With Natural Foods and the Curse Of Louis Pasteur and her new book Lick the Sugar Habit Sugar Counter.

Her website is www.NancyAppleton.com

References:

1. Beatrice Trum Hunter, "Confusing Consumers About Sugar Intake," CONSUMERS' RESEARCH 78, no 1 (January 1995): 14-17.

2. Judith Hallfrisch, "Metabolic Effects of Dietary Fructose," FASEB JOURNAL 4 (June 1990): 2652-2660.

3. H. F. Bunn and P. J. Higgins, "Reaction of Nonosaccharides with Proteins; Possible Evolutionary Significance." SCIENCE 213 (1981):2222?2244.

4. William L Dills Jr., "Protein Fructosylation: Fructose and the Maillard Reaction," AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION 58 (suppl) (1993): 779S-787S.

5. J. Hallfrisch et al., "The Effects of Fructose on Blood Lipid Levels," AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION 37, no, 3 (1983): 740-748

6. Claire B. Hollenbeck, "Dietary Fructose Effects on Lipoprotein Metabolism and Risk for Coronary Artery Disease," AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION 58 (suppl), (1993): 800S-807S.

7. Hallfrisch, 1990.

8. J. Macdonald, Anne Keyser, and Deborah Pacy, "Some Effects, in Man, of Varying the Load of Glucose, Sucrose, Fructose, or Sorbitol on Various Metabolites in Blood," AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION 31 (August 1978)): 1305-1311.

9. D. Zakim and R. H. Herman, AFructose Metabolism II,@ AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION 21: 315-319, 1968

10. A. E. Bender and K. B. Damji, "Some Effects of Dietary Sucrose," WORLD REVIEW OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS 15 (1972): 104-155.

11. Hunter

12. Hunter

13. A. E. Bergstra, A. G. Lemmens, and A. C. Beynens, "Dietary Fructose vs. Glucose Stimulates Nephrocalcinogenesis in Female Rats," JOURNAL OF NUTRITION 123, no. 7 (July 1993): 1320-1327.

14. R. Ivaturi and C. Kies, "Mineral Balances in Humans as Affected by Fructose, High Fructose Corn Syrup and Sucrose," PLANT FOODS FOR HUMAN NUTRITION 42, no. 2 (1992): 143-151.

15. J. J. Rumessen and E. Gudmand-Hoyer, "Functional Bowel Disease: Malabsorption and Abdominal Distress After Ingestion of Fructose, Sorbitol, and Fructose-Sorbitol Mixtures," GASTROENTEROLOGY 95, no. 3 (September 1988): 694-700.

16. Roger B. Mc Donald, "Influence of Dietary Sucrose on Biological Aging," AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION 62 (suppl), (1995): 284s-293s.

17. www.NutritionNewsFocus.com, May 25, 2000.

18. H. Hallfrisch, et al., AThe Effects of Fructose on Blood Lipid Levels,@ AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION, 37: 5, 1983, 740-748.

19. Klevay, Leslie, acting director of the U.S. Agriculture Department=s Human Nutrition Research Center, Grand Forks, N.D.

20. Hollenback

21. Hallfrisch.

22. Hunter


30 posted on 01/11/2007 11:58:29 PM PST by Bittersweetmd (God is Great and greatly to be praised.)
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To: A Strict Constructionist; Mase
"Fructose is a monosaccharide (one simple sugar)and sucrose is a disaccharide(two)."

The discussion is about HFCS, which is 42-55% fructose, the remainder is glucose. HFCS-55 is 55% fructose and has a sweetness equivalent to sucrose. That's why it's used in pop. Sucrose is 50/50 fructose/glucose. As Maze said, fructose is converted to glucose in the liver. There can be no differences between corn HFCS and sucrose.

The glycemic index of both is the same because sucrose already provides ~60. The base is 100, provided by glucose. That means the the sucrose is already completely hydrolyzed, some fructose has already been converted to glucose and the sucrose is effectively in the state of HFCS well within the 2-3 hour time of the glycemic index measurement.

31 posted on 01/12/2007 1:03:52 AM PST by spunkets
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To: PizzaDriver

bump to #31


32 posted on 01/12/2007 1:05:34 AM PST by spunkets
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To: JerseyHighlander
Symbiosis and co-evolution.

Much different than "fructose evolved".

Unless you're one of those creationists?

Hardly.

33 posted on 01/12/2007 7:32:00 AM PST by Toddsterpatriot (There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it.)
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To: A Strict Constructionist
Fructose is a monosaccharide (one simple sugar)and sucrose is a disaccharide(two)

Once again, do you understand that sucrose is made up of 50% glucose and 50% fructose? High fructose corn syrup is commercialized in two formulas. One, used mostly in soft drinks, is comprised of approximately 55% fructose and 45% glucose. The other, used mostly in baked goods and cereals, is made up of approximately 42% fructose and 58% glucose. Glucose and fructose are both monosaccharides.

High fructose corn syrup is also a monosaccharide while sucrose is a disaccharide. Your gut utilizes the enzyme sucrase to easily and quickly break down sucrose into the monosaccharides, glucose and fructose. At that point, the body metabolizes them the same as it would glucose and fructose from high fructose corn syrup.

Their gylcemic indices are different.

They both fall in the 55-60 range. That makes them essentially identical.

Fructose is very low compared to sucrose.

Considering that sucrose is 50% fructose and 50% glucose, your statement is doesn't make any sense.

I'm betting on the research that implicates fructose with obesity and other problems with blood lipids.

Then you probably also chose Ohio State in the Fiesta Bowl. You shouldn't bet on things you don't understand.

34 posted on 01/12/2007 7:45:24 AM PST by Mase (Save me from the people who would save me from myself!)
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To: NorCalRepub
HFCS is used mainly cause it is easier in the processing of foodstuffs and does not crystallize like sugar does...

Actually, I think it may have as much to do with the pricing structure as anything.

35 posted on 01/12/2007 7:48:53 AM PST by Oberon (What does it take to make government shrink?)
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To: PizzaDriver
>Sugar

 

36 posted on 01/12/2007 7:50:44 AM PST by theFIRMbss
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To: PizzaDriver
Boylan Cane Cola

Thanks for the tip, I will look for Mexican Coca Cola.

Funny story relayed by a buddy, he vacationed in Bermuda, coming back the Customs officer squinted at him and said quizzically, you are bringing back.....Coke????? His monotone reply, "It's a long story."

The long story, what is being discussed here, HFCS.

37 posted on 01/12/2007 8:04:03 AM PST by Jason_b (http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4312730277175242198&q=)
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To: jonrick46; Lexinom
High Fructose Corn syrup does not trigger the full mechanism.......Actually, this trick on the full mechanism enables the food marketeers to sell their triple burger with cheeze and a super sized fries and then sell a larger soda because their customer will not feel full because of the soda

That's absurd. High fructose corn syrup and sugar are made up of the same two monosaccharides in almost identical proportions. The body metabolizes them in the same way. There is little difference in the satiety profiles of sucrose and high fructose corn syrup.

From Martine Perrigue and colleagues at the University of Washington:

Board/Abstract # LB433

There's more:

Program Abstract #391.2

38 posted on 01/12/2007 8:45:37 AM PST by Mase (Save me from the people who would save me from myself!)
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To: SiliconValleyGuy
Sugar's not responsible for our obesity. Spoons are.

Yes, but a spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.
In the most delightful way, I might add.

39 posted on 01/12/2007 8:53:01 AM PST by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a liberal when I married her.)
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To: PizzaDriver

Sugar, ahh,
honey, honey.
you are my candy girl,
and you got me wanting you.

40 posted on 01/12/2007 8:57:50 AM PST by r9etb
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To: SiliconValleyGuy

That's Pizza Driver's point. Which is why you feel "fuller" on less w/real sugar.


41 posted on 01/12/2007 8:59:14 AM PST by RockinRight (To compare Congress to drunken sailors is an insult to drunken sailors. - Ronald W. Reagan)
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To: TheSarce
Okay, I bookmarked that site. I'll be placing an order later. (I'll have to go for the caffeine-free version, sadly, but maybe I'll buy some as a birthday present for my sister-in-law!)

Talk about a premium: I buy two cases of soda for $10.00 when they're on sale, so I'll be paying double, before shipping. Should be worth it, though.

42 posted on 01/12/2007 9:00:38 AM PST by Tanniker Smith (I didn't know she was a liberal when I married her.)
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To: Mase

I have seen studies that have seen differences in the metabolic transmitters to the brain satiety region with high fructose corn syrup. I don't have time to dig them up again, but I will later.


43 posted on 01/12/2007 9:42:12 AM PST by jonrick46
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To: jonrick46
I have seen studies that have seen differences in the metabolic transmitters to the brain satiety region with high fructose corn syrup

Hopefully those studies will explain how glucose and fructose from high fructose corn syrup differ from glucose and fructose from hydrolyzed sucrose. If the satiety profiles are different then the formulas and structures of glucose and fructose from one would have to be different than the other. They're not.

Sucrose is hydrolyzed very quickly in the gut and shouldn't vary much from hfcs. If anything, high fructose corn syrup, a monsaccharide, should get glucose into your blood sooner and, therefore, create a feeling of fullness faster than sucrose. This is the opposite of what you're claiming.

44 posted on 01/12/2007 10:05:50 AM PST by Mase (Save me from the people who would save me from myself!)
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To: Mase
One particular study in 2004 reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition cites the increase in consumption of HFCS to be 1000% between 1970 and 1990. They calculated this to exceed any equivalent increase in consumption of any other food or food group.

Take a few moments for yourself when you go to the mall sometime and count how many overweight people you see as opposed to people with normal body weight. I was amazed when I did it during the Christmas shopping season. One thing that I found that I have no answer for is how few Asians were overweight. Are there any answers for this observation?

Furthermore, with the AJ of CN study, in studying this increase — and the nearly identically corresponding increase in obesity in the US — these researchers took into account the differences in the way the body responds to different sorts of sugars. Specifically, that “unlike glucose, fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion or enhance leptin production.” They postulate that dietary fructose may be contributing to American obesity issues because “insulin and leptin act as key afferent signals in the regulation of food intake and body weight.” In other words, this study proposes that because fructose doesn’t trip our sense of satiety as sugar would, we are, perhaps, eating more sugars to compensate, and upping overall caloric intake in the process. Further, they extrapolate that because HFCS is usually higher in fructose than table sugar, HFCS can be correlated with parallel increases in obesity.

I predict that the use of HFCS as a fuel source in the production of methanol will drive the price upward as it competes for its use in the food industry. With the recent dietary revelations maybe it would be wise if we can divert some of that HFCS to methanol production after all.
45 posted on 01/12/2007 2:49:56 PM PST by jonrick46
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To: jonrick46
One particular study in 2004 reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition cites the increase in consumption of HFCS to be 1000% between 1970 and 1990.

How much did cane sugar consumption drop? How does fructose+glucose consumption compare between those years?

I predict that the use of HFCS as a fuel source in the production of methanol will drive the price upward as it competes for its use in the food industry.

You sure about that?

46 posted on 01/12/2007 7:34:41 PM PST by Toddsterpatriot (There is no cause so right that one cannot find a fool following it.)
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To: PizzaDriver
Libkill looks at his belly and reminds himself, It's all a matter of inflow and outflow. More calories in than burned, it piles up.

Sigh.

47 posted on 01/12/2007 7:39:39 PM PST by LibKill (ENOUGH! Take the warning labels off everything and let Saint Darwin do his job.)
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To: Mase
Just want to interject here that I believe the problem with HFCT is that because it was readily available and fairly cheap, food manufacturers have been putting it into all sorts of processed foods that would normally not have sugar added. I have seen it as an ingredient in hot dogs, spaghetti sauce, chicken pot pies, and salad dressings.

None of those items, if made at home, would require sugar. So how come it's put in the processed versions? The only thing I can think of is that the sweet taste camouflages what would otherwise be a bland recipe.

This is my non-scientific observation, and as far as all of the technical stuff, I will leave it to people who know what they are talking about. I don't.

48 posted on 01/12/2007 7:49:39 PM PST by Miss Marple (Prayers for Jemian's son,: Lord, please keep him safe and bring him home .)
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To: PizzaDriver
That, you'll recall, is Sugar on top!


49 posted on 01/12/2007 7:51:50 PM PST by Revolting cat! (We all need someone we can bleed on...)
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To: who_would_fardels_bear

I only wish I'd thought of it first. Darn.

All I can say is...Don't blame sugar. It doesn't force anybody to eat it.


50 posted on 01/12/2007 7:52:28 PM PST by RichInOC (Rich's Undeniable Truth of the Day: Stupidity is its own punishment.)
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