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The Mob That Whacked Jersey. How rapacious government withered the Garden State
City Journal.com ^ | January 16, 2007 | by Steven Malanga

Posted on 01/16/2007 9:42:11 AM PST by aculeus

When Cy Thannikary left India to come work at the UN in Manhattan, he settled in Flushing, Queens, and loved the excitement of living in the city. After starting a family, though, he traded New York’s hubbub for Freehold, New Jersey, a quiet suburb with lower taxes and affordable housing. That was 25 years ago. These days, Thannikary sometimes feels like he’s back in Gotham as he watches his taxes soar and hears neighbors grumble. He has started a new group, Citizens for Property Tax Reform, to fight the special interests that have turned both state and local government into profligate spenders. “Politicians in New Jersey have treated their citizens as ATMs,” he complains. “They have no idea how to restrain spending, and more and more people are saying they can’t afford to live here anymore.”

For more than a century and a half, New Jersey, nestled between New York City and Philadelphia, offered commuters like Thannikary affordable living in pleasant communities. Wall Street tycoons, middle managers fleeing high-priced Gotham once they’d married and had kids, and immigrants who settled first in New York but quickly discovered that they could pursue the American dream more easily across the Hudson—all flocked into the Garden State. Eventually, New Jersey’s congenial living attracted even corporations escaping New York’s rising crime and taxes. The state flourished.

But today Jersey is a cautionary example of how to cripple a thriving state. Increasingly muscular public-sector unions have won billions in outlandish benefits and wages from compliant officeholders. A powerful public education cartel has driven school spending skyward, making Jersey among the nation’s biggest education spenders, even as student achievement lags. Inept, often corrupt, politicians have squandered yet more billions wrung from suburban taxpayers, supposedly to uplift the poor in the state’s troubled cities, which have nevertheless continued to crumble despite the record spending. To fund this extravagance, the state has relentlessly raised taxes on both residents and businesses, while localities have jacked up property taxes furiously. Jersey’s cost advantage over its free-spending neighbors has vanished: it is now among the nation’s most heavily taxed places. And despite the extra levies, new governor Jon Corzine faces a $4.5 billion deficit and a stagnant economy during a national boom.

Unless Garden State leaders can stand up to entrenched interests—and the signs aren’t promising—the state may find itself permanently relegated to second-class economic status. New Jersey “could become the next California, with budget problems too big to solve without a lot of pain,” warns former Jersey City mayor Bret Schundler. “The old way of raising taxes to solve budget problems has been tried, and it’s done nothing but make things worse.”

Once a farming corridor connecting New York and Philadelphia, the state that Benjamin Franklin called “a keg tapped at both ends” began its rapid evolution in the nineteenth century, spurred by the growth of the railroads. Enterprising New Yorkers like merchant Matthias Ogden Halsted led the way. In 1837, he repossessed a 100-acre farm in Orange, New Jersey—about 12 miles west of Manhattan—and built a magnificent mansion, featuring Corinthian columns that one historian celebrated as “unlike anything the area had ever seen.” He subdivided the rest of the farm to provide homes for city friends. These new suburban commuters even chipped in to help build a railway station on the nearby Lackawanna train line—a stop that still serves commuters today.

In 1853, following Halsted’s example, Manhattan drug wholesaler Llewellyn Solomon Haskell bought land along a ridge of the Orange Mountains, laid down roads, and built grand homes. Thus was born Llewellyn Park, America’s first gated community. Described by the New York Times in 1865 as “a rough, shaggy mountain site, now transformed into an enchanted ground,” Llewellyn Park soon attracted such eminent residents as Thomas Edison, and it boasted magnificent houses designed by noted architects, including Stanford White, Charles McKim, and Calvert Vaux. Soon the entire area around the Oranges blossomed, with stylish homes on broad boulevards. Fashionable New York stores like B. Altman and Best & Co. turned the area’s dazzling main shopping strip into the rightly nicknamed “Fifth Avenue of the suburbs.”

Jersey’s development accelerated during the second half of the nineteenth and the early twentieth centuries, as more and more workers opted for suburban comfort. A new railroad line here, a bridge or road there, would unlock a whole new swath of the state to commuters, igniting countless mini-real-estate booms.

Two rail lines transformed Montclair in the mid-nineteenth century from a sleepy trading post into a bustling New York commuter town, filled with spacious Tudor- and Queen Anne–style homes. Montclair’s biggest houses, on a ridge at the foot of the Watchung Mountains facing New York, would one day house many of Gotham’s financial elite, including, during the late 1980s, the chief executives of three of Manhattan’s biggest banks. In the same way, a causeway over the Shrewsbury River in 1870, linking farmland communities like Fair Haven and Rumson to ferries on the Atlantic, prompted a number of New York financiers, including Jacob Schiff, to build estates in the area and begin commuting across New York harbor to work.

Some 60 miles north of Rumson and 50 years later, construction of the George Washington Bridge, connecting upper Manhattan and the Bronx to northern New Jersey, led to a different kind of housing boom in places like Teaneck, a middle-class town where developers erected English Tudors, Dutch Colonials, and smaller houses of stucco and brick. In the decade leading up to the bridge’s opening, Teaneck’s population grew fourfold, part of a population upsurge that remade northern Jersey.

As inexpensive mass transportation expanded, Jersey sprouted a dense network of middle-class suburbs, home to many Manhattan middle managers—the traders, back-office managers, and salesmen who serve as corporate New York’s foot soldiers. In the 1960s, the Levitt family, famous for converting Long Island farmland into the middle-class suburb of Levittown after World War II, replicated the project on a more modest scale in Somerset, New Jersey, building nearly 1,000 houses in William Levitt’s classic Cape Cod design. Middle-income New Yorkers came in droves. Farther north, in Hillsdale, where the Hackensack & New York Railroad once had a terminus, hundreds of modest two- and three-bedroom prewar colonial houses, originally built for railroad workers, formed the core of a housing market dominated by Manhattan commuters. Eisenhower-era ranch houses in Middleton, Morristown townhouse developments, condos on former industrial land in Jersey City and Secaucus—all attracted commuters, so that now more than 300,000 Gotham workers call Jersey home.

Jersey would even cultivate its own patrician dynasties of Gothamites. Shortly before launching the New York–based financial magazine bearing his name in 1917, B. C. Forbes moved his family from Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, to Englewood, New Jersey, on the western slope of the Palisades. After his magazine took off and Forbes became prominent within Englewood—by then home to many of Manhattan’s financial elite—his son Malcolm married one of the town’s finest, Roberta Laidlaw, whose family owned the New York investment firm Laidlaw & Co. The pair moved into a baronial estate in the rolling hills of Somerset County, deep in the Jersey heartland. Among their neighbors: Aristotle and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, former secretary of state Cyrus Vance, and longtime Dillon Read chairman and ex–treasury secretary Douglas Dillon.

The commuters have given New Jersey the highest average family income in the country—$74,000-plus a year. In one five-year period during the mid-1990s, Jersey had a net gain of $2.8 billion in family income from New York, thanks to between-state migration, the Empire State Foundation found.

The ex–New Yorkers who formed the Jersey towns favored small government and low taxes, which came to define the state’s politics. As early as 1840, the mayor of Jersey City—then a settlement of just over 3,000—boasted of his town’s “small amount of taxes levied to support state, county and city government compared to New York and Brooklyn” (an independent municipality at the time). Jerseyans could be downright ornery about taxation. During the Depression, the state’s Republican governor, Harold Hoffman, enacted a sales tax; so great was the backlash that the legislature quickly rescinded the levy. By the early 1960s, Jersey was one of only two states without a sales or an income tax; New York had both. Jersey ranked 40th among states in total tax burden, 13 percent below the national average.

The presence of a white-collar commuting workforce—and the low-tax economic climate it helped create—would help New Jersey lure firms fleeing New York. By 1910, more than half the state’s urban and suburban residents worked in office jobs, as clerks, typists, managers, and executives. When Gotham’s corporations, at first seeking space and then, beginning in the sixties, pushed by high taxes and escalating crime, began to abandon the city, Jersey was an attractive option. AT&T, Chubb Insurance, American Standard, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and others began flocking to where many of their employees already lived. Technological advances also helped Jersey draw the back-office operations of major finance players like Merrill Lynch, which kept its Manhattan headquarters but now employed thousands of support workers in cheaper Garden State digs, connected by phone and computer.

The New York corporate exiles nourished New Jersey’s economy, just as the commuters did. Starting in the 1950s, Jersey’s economy began growing at twice the pace of New York State’s and easily outperformed it for most of the rest of the century. Even in finance, New York City’s economic engine, New Jersey has almost matched Gotham’s growth in recent decades. It added 143,000 financial-sector jobs between 1970 and 2000, compared with 154,000 new jobs in New York City over the same period, as financial wizards no longer chose only to live in the Garden State but also to work there. Even soon-to-be New York mayor Michael Bloomberg got in on the action. From a small Princeton office in the late 1980s, the mayor’s company, Bloomberg LP, grew to employ 1,500 in New Jersey by the early twenty-first century.

[See link for remainder of this long article.]


TOPICS: Extended News; US: New Jersey; US: New York
KEYWORDS: govwatch; joisey; laborunions; montclair; taxes; teaneck; unions
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1 posted on 01/16/2007 9:42:14 AM PST by aculeus
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To: aculeus

The inevitable result of tax-and-spend Democrap policy, aka socialism: economic ruin.


2 posted on 01/16/2007 9:50:24 AM PST by piytar
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To: aculeus
Unfortunately, this disease is moving west and Eastern PA is starting to look like Jersey - ie - high taxes, unions and poor service...
3 posted on 01/16/2007 9:59:21 AM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: aculeus
Inept, often corrupt, politicians have squandered yet more billions wrung from suburban taxpayers, supposedly to uplift the poor in the state’s troubled cities, which have nevertheless continued to crumble despite the record spending.

Like McGreevy and Torricelli and now Corzine cozy with one of the public union reps? Who would have thunk it? But the sheeple keep voting Democratic.

4 posted on 01/16/2007 9:59:38 AM PST by Rummyfan (Iraq: Give therapeutic violence a chance!)
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To: dead


5 posted on 01/16/2007 10:01:35 AM PST by Joe Brower (The Constitution defines Conservatism. *NRA*)
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To: aculeus; Clemenza
Under McGreevey, New Jersey also instituted its own estate tax, kicking in at $675,000 in assets, well below the $2 million starting point for the federal death tax. Now a Jersey resident dying with $1.9 million in savings will owe the state nearly $100,000—an egregious levy that makes Jersey Number One in the country in per-capita death-tax collections. Perhaps to protect its residents from dying with too much wealth, the state also raised taxes on retirees with $100,000 or more in annual income, charging them extra to help pay public-sector retirees.

Shouldn't the New Jersey estate tax be called the Retiree Florida Relocation Act?

6 posted on 01/16/2007 10:16:43 AM PST by Paleo Conservative
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To: aculeus
New Jersey is corrupt. Even the rich have abandoned the GOP, a me-too party, for the Democrats. Its in such a mess its literally beyond salvation.

"Show me just what Mohammed brought that was new, and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached." - Manuel II Palelologus

7 posted on 01/16/2007 10:24:00 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: Paleo Conservative
The Blue State future is a Democratic one in which a thin crust of rich liberals rules over a huge mass of poor liberals and both vote Democratic.

"Show me just what Mohammed brought that was new, and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached." - Manuel II Palelologus

8 posted on 01/16/2007 10:25:52 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: aculeus
This is a great article - my gawd - how liberalism have destroyed the state. But the sheep keep voting them in...
9 posted on 01/16/2007 10:26:07 AM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: aculeus

The politicians will never stop increasing taxes in this country until the people rise up and revolt. Where Jersey is now, is where the rest of the country is headed. It's only a matter of time.


10 posted on 01/16/2007 10:28:49 AM PST by subterfuge (Today, Tolerance =greatest virtue;Hypocrisy=worst character defect; Discrimination =worst atrocity)
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To: 2banana
The middle class will flee New Jersey. Its just too expensive to live there and to see all one's earnings go to feed an ever growing rapacious government. The rich can afford the tab. The poor? They don't have to pay taxes.

"Show me just what Mohammed brought that was new, and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached." - Manuel II Palelologus

11 posted on 01/16/2007 10:29:05 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: aculeus; All

The major problem with NJ? Not a single member of the political class is worth the jail time for um, "neutralizing" him or her.


12 posted on 01/16/2007 10:40:02 AM PST by olde north church (Hell, yes, I advocate violence.)
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To: olde north church
The Democrats are liberal. New Jersey's Republicans are liberal, too. And there's no conservative in sight in that state or anywhere for that matter in the vast Blue wasteland known as the Northeast.

"Show me just what Mohammed brought that was new, and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached." - Manuel II Palelologus

13 posted on 01/16/2007 10:42:41 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: 2banana
I agree, but the Republican Party in the state became just as corrupt and lazy as the Democrats.

The Republican Party needs a LEADER, not some putz who's "turn has come". A leader with a plan like the 1994 "Contract with America" someone who will lead.

Bret Shundler has some promise, but must overcome the "Republican Machine", someone who is not an insider, someone who will reform the party into an effective political force.
14 posted on 01/16/2007 10:43:06 AM PST by Rumplemeyer
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To: Rumplemeyer
Good luck on purging the NJGOP of its RINOs. They can no longer win statewide. Democrat Bob Menendez easily dispached RINO Tom Kean despite the fact they agreed on virtually every issue under the sun. Why vote Republican when they are just as corrupt as the Democrats?

"Show me just what Mohammed brought that was new, and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached." - Manuel II Palelologus

15 posted on 01/16/2007 10:45:44 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: aculeus; piytar; goldstategop
Just look at who the most recent NJ governors were: Kean, Florio, Whitman, McGreevey, Corzine. That's two RINOS (Kean and Whitman) and three 'Rats.

No wonder why the state is decadent.

16 posted on 01/16/2007 10:48:39 AM PST by justiceseeker93
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To: aculeus
New Jersey is owned and operated by the education mafia. New Jersey politicians, as a class, are as corrupt as any in a typical third-world country. The state is long gone. I can't imagine why any productive citizen would still be there, grabbing his ankles. (On the other hand, given the way they vote in New Jersey, I would prefer they STAY there.)

17 posted on 01/16/2007 10:49:08 AM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: Lancey Howard
The difference between NJ and The Sopranos is NJ doesn't deliver service. The Sopranos do.

"Show me just what Mohammed brought that was new, and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached." - Manuel II Palelologus

18 posted on 01/16/2007 10:51:23 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: aculeus
New Jersey is rapidly becoming a dysfunctional polity, rather like Washington DC, where only one party is returned to power, no matter its performance.

Regards, Ivan

19 posted on 01/16/2007 10:52:56 AM PST by MadIvan (I aim to misbehave.)
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To: justiceseeker93; goldstategop
Just look at who the most recent NJ governors were: Kean, Florio, Whitman, McGreevey, Corzine. That's two RINOS (Kean and Whitman) and three 'Rats.

And then there was Acting Governor Don DiFrancesco, who completed the end of Christie's term when she went to Washington. Ever wonder why he didn't run for Governor?

Toilets don't get any more foul than New Jersey.
Like everywhere else, the people there deserve who they elect.

20 posted on 01/16/2007 10:54:19 AM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: MadIvan
More like Old Mexico. The electorate seems prepared to live with Democratic corruption because there's no viable political alternative. As I noted, in the Northeast, real conservatives for elective public office are virtually non-existent. With the disappearance of the Rockefeller GOP, all that's left standing are the Democrats. The "Gypsy Moths" are histoire.

"Show me just what Mohammed brought that was new, and there you will find things only evil and inhuman, such as his command to spread by the sword the faith he preached." - Manuel II Palelologus

21 posted on 01/16/2007 10:57:10 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: aculeus

This is why land ownership was originally a requirement for voting.


22 posted on 01/16/2007 11:01:01 AM PST by relictele
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To: piytar
Part of the problem represents those New York emigres.

They brought with them the belief that government has a responsibility to provide those services New Yorker City folks consider so very essential to their survival - and older New Jersey residents got along without just fine for generations.

These people scream about the high cost of government but would be the first to complain if little Jimmy or Susie had to walk several blocks to school or to a bus stop, instead of getting picked up right at home, or if they didn't have all kinds of activities after school so both parents could pursue "careers" instead of assuming the responsibilities of parenthood (just one example).

Also there are the two biggest blood-suckers in the civil service world - the Law Enforcement Unions and the Teachers Union.

There are probably more Cops per square mile in Jersey than anywhere since Hitler's Germany: municipal cops, County cops, park police, County police, sheriff's officers, state police, and institutional police. many, if not all of these units' members can retire after 20 years of service at something like 60% of their salary and perks and benies which would make your head spin. If they hang in there a few more years, they can even get 75% of their base salary. THEN they retire and get ANOTHER civil service job covered by another union in the law-enforcement area, which allows them to double-dip at public expense. Unlike ordinary civil servants, the Cops can retire on a retirement based on the last year's EARNED INCOME, not salary. SO in the last year of employment, it is common practice for Jersey Cops to scoff up as much overtime as possible to boost their pensions.

The teachers can retire at 55 with similar perks and benefits and don't even pay into their health benefit program.

ALL civil service positions in New Jersey allow their employees to retire with paid sick leave for a certain percentage of their accrued unused sick time.

IN ADDITION, in New Jersey, it is common practice for well-connected elected officials who draw a minimal salary as part-time "employees" as elected officials, to get appointed to one of the many lucrative commissions and committees which exist at fantastic salaries which, using the retirement formula of the highest paid years of service times the total years of service, they are able to "retire" with substantial benefits, far beyond anything the average civil service clerk could ever obtain. Additionally, the experience of these individuals for the appointment plums they receive is often minimal to none.

Sheep are meant to be sheared.
23 posted on 01/16/2007 11:03:30 AM PST by ZULU (Non nobis, non nobis Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam. God, guts and guns made America great.)
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To: aculeus

We have many of the same problems in Ohio.


24 posted on 01/16/2007 11:05:11 AM PST by You Dirty Rats (I Love Free Republic!)
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To: aculeus

and the thing is - Corzine has high approval ratings.


25 posted on 01/16/2007 11:06:01 AM PST by oceanview
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To: oceanview

No.

Corzine's last approval rating was 38%.

But that doesn't mean anything.

Sheep, in addition to being basically lazy and stupid, have short memories.


26 posted on 01/16/2007 11:07:15 AM PST by ZULU (Non nobis, non nobis Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam. God, guts and guns made America great.)
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To: goldstategop

very true. The rich in NJ - are Dems - they make their money by being connected to the corrupt system the government provides. The other constituencies in the state - the poor, the lower middle class, government workers - are all natural Dem voters too.

there is no one left to vote for change.


27 posted on 01/16/2007 11:08:39 AM PST by oceanview
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To: goldstategop

"With the disappearance of the Rockefeller GOP"

The "Rockefeller GOP" was and is, part of the problem. They vote, think and act like Democrats, but can assuage their elitist pride by referring to themselves as "Republicans", instead of associating with the vulgar masses.


28 posted on 01/16/2007 11:09:01 AM PST by ZULU (Non nobis, non nobis Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam. God, guts and guns made America great.)
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To: ZULU

http://www.newsday.com/news/local/wire/newjersey/ny-bc-nj--corzine-oneyear1225dec25,0,4282969.story?coll=ny-region-apnewjersey

"...said Corzine, whose approval rating has climbed from 39 percent after taking office _ and after proposing $2 billion in tax increases _ to nearly 60 percent in recent polls."

12/25/2006


29 posted on 01/16/2007 11:14:49 AM PST by oceanview
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To: ZULU

Excellent post.


30 posted on 01/16/2007 11:33:59 AM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: oceanview; goldstategop
there is no one left to vote for change.

Well, there's always voting with your feet.

31 posted on 01/16/2007 11:36:36 AM PST by Paleo Conservative
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To: Lancey Howard
Don DiFrancesco, "Donny D" was exposed by Bret Schundler as a corrupt little turd, this caused the RINO Republican "Establishment" to withhold support, it was "Donny D's" turn.

The result was Jimmy "Fudge Pants" McGreavy and a lot of rude "New Jersey" comments.

The Old Guard RINO Establishment needs to be run out and a leader with a "Contract With New Jersey" platform based on the 1994 Republican "Contract With America".

Remember, the Left didn't institute all these changes at once, it took 30 years, it can be undone, but it won't be undone in one electing cycle.

We "the great unwashed" must begin to take back our government, one battle at a time, the one thing the Left fears above all else is an informed electorate.
32 posted on 01/16/2007 11:39:52 AM PST by Rumplemeyer
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To: Paleo Conservative

yes, but wherever you go - in time, the same problems are coming there.


33 posted on 01/16/2007 11:42:38 AM PST by oceanview
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To: justiceseeker93

I wouldn't lump Whitman in with the others. She was the only one who actually cut taxes and spending. Unfortuantely, 7 years wasn't enough time to undo decades of damage. It would've taken several more Republican administrations do really get something done.


34 posted on 01/16/2007 11:54:39 AM PST by MinnesotaLibertarian
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To: MadIvan; All
There is only one party in New Jersey. The titles and the debate are all for show. Some towns have gone so far as to eliminate the party affiliation. West Windsor for instance does not allow candidates in its mayoral elections to run under a party heading. Given the fact that Democrats and Republicans are two sides of the same coin in this state, I am sure it suits them just fine.

What is most amusing about being surrounded by liberals is that they all complain, threaten to move and as Ivan mentioned they crawl through broken glass to vote for more of the same each and every year.

It may be too far gone to bother. It may be the perfect spot to test out a new party. Hoping to reform the GOP in New Jersey is a fool's errand.
35 posted on 01/16/2007 1:36:11 PM PST by dmartin (Who Dares Wins)
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To: oceanview

I heard a few days ago it was 38%.

Well, never underestimate the gullability and stupidy of the American voter - especially in Blue States.

The man is a LIAR. He said he wouldn't raise taxes.

Not only did he RAISE taxes, he CREATED NEW ONES!!

And his phoney act about just dicovering that the state was badly in the red after taking office is nonsense. How could his stool pigeon Codey not have told him, assuming he was naive enough not to know already?


36 posted on 01/16/2007 1:37:32 PM PST by ZULU (Non nobis, non nobis Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam. God, guts and guns made America great.)
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To: Lancey Howard

Thanks


37 posted on 01/16/2007 1:37:52 PM PST by ZULU (Non nobis, non nobis Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam. God, guts and guns made America great.)
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To: Rumplemeyer
The RINO establishment, under the leadership of Lewis Eisenberg, also torpedoed Brett Schundler's candidacy for Senator and gave it to little Tommy Kean Jr., RINO Tom Kean Senior's little boy.

Not unexpectedly, he lost since he provided little or no alternative to Menendez, aside from running a crappy personal campaign instead of focusing in on the issues. But then if he had done that, people would have realized how identical these two fools are.
38 posted on 01/16/2007 1:43:22 PM PST by ZULU (Non nobis, non nobis Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam. God, guts and guns made America great.)
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To: MinnesotaLibertarian
PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Whitman cut taxes all right - A LOT! Then she DIDN'T cut programs, payroll or expenditures. What do YOU think the result of that was?

Also, Whitman gave the Easy Pass contract to a bunch of crooks, and pretty much wasted her term of office demonstrating how much of a leftist liberal she was.

When she got herself appointed as EPA chief under Bush, probably Witt Eisenberg's money, she proceeded to demonstrate how little she knew of that subject. Then she tried to cut the feet off the guy who put her there (Bush).

After she left office she wrote a book which went NOWHERE called "Its My Party TOO" - all about how the Republican party is a Big Tent that should have room for limousine liberals and Rockefeller Republicans like her.

Maybe she should write a book about how the Democrats should make room for conservatives.

Its not without reason that Ann Coulter refers to her as "birdbrain" in one of her books.

Whitman's fiscal irresponsibility started New Jersey on its road to economic ruin. McGreevey and his successors just helped push it along a lot faster.
39 posted on 01/16/2007 1:49:13 PM PST by ZULU (Non nobis, non nobis Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam. God, guts and guns made America great.)
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To: dmartin

Move.

But don't bring any of those New York City emigre libeals with you.


40 posted on 01/16/2007 1:50:31 PM PST by ZULU (Non nobis, non nobis Domine, sed nomini tuo da gloriam. God, guts and guns made America great.)
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To: goldstategop
And there's no conservative in sight in that state or anywhere for that matter in the vast Blue wasteland known as the Northeast.

Bret Schundler gave it a try but the establishment party apparatus submarined him and the sheeple repudiated him in a landslide. So the 'Pubs turned to moderate candidates like Kean Jr. and the sheeple still voted against him in droves. I guess the voters figured why vote for moderate 'Pubs who are trying to undercut the 'Rat vote when they can vote for 'Rats and have the real article ('Rats). So conservative 'Pubs get blown out in Jersey, and moderate 'Pubs also lose big time. Sounds like a hopeless case of 'Ratland to me.

41 posted on 01/16/2007 2:11:23 PM PST by chimera
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To: Rumplemeyer
the one thing the Left fears above all else is an informed electorate

Unfortunately, sometimes it is simply too late.

When the bulk of "the electorate" are either government-dependent parasites or government-enriched parasites, that doesn't leave much room for normal, honest, hard-working, traditional families to make a correction, no matter how "informed" they are. It comes down purely to a matter of numbers.

In the case of places like New Jersey and California, it's likely high time for the decent people to vacate for greener pastures; maybe head down south. Those who stick around grabbing their ankles may end up like "the last white farmers in Zimbabwe."

42 posted on 01/16/2007 2:13:01 PM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: aculeus

The painful fact is that, in America today, it is easy for politicians to ignore the hard working and productive middle class that pay the taxes. It is very difficult to ignore the government unions, the teacher unions, the professional gripers and the race hustlers. For the most part they make politicians lives much more unpleasant than middle class Americans do.

But the fellow at the beginning of this article has the right idea. The productive need to start flexing their considerable muscle. In an ideal world we would elect people whose principles cannot be shaken by threats and pressure. But given the world we live in, most politicians will do what is expedient. We have to make it expedient to lower taxes, spend less, and learn to say "No." It can be done. I have seen it done in Texas.


43 posted on 01/16/2007 2:20:09 PM PST by Zack Nguyen
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To: Lancey Howard
Nice Picture! This past summer we moved to NC after almost 40 years of Jersey Living! I wish I had run sooner. The funny thing is that all the Libs are fleeing down here and guess who they vote for? You got it More LIBS!

I figure I will never see the abuse that we had in NJ in the years left.

NJ even took a 6K Real Estate Transfer Tax tax from me. That was increased this past summer. One of the highest in the nation. I call it the door in the azz tax.

44 posted on 01/16/2007 2:48:12 PM PST by Afronaut (Press 2 for English - Thanks Mr. President !)
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To: Zack Nguyen
"We have to make it expedient to lower taxes, spend less, and learn to say "No." It can be done. I have seen it done in Texas."

The Rats can win with dead guys and crimminals in NJ. Trust me, they will never be forced to do anything that they don't want to. The people in NJ expect to get fleeced.

They love it.

45 posted on 01/16/2007 2:53:45 PM PST by Afronaut (Press 2 for English - Thanks Mr. President !)
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To: Lancey Howard
Yes, I omitted DiFrancesco. Why didn't he run for governor?

Another more recent "Acting Governor" was Richard Codey, who seemed to be fairly nice guy, judging from public appearances. Maybe that's why he was shoved aside by the 'Rats when Corzine decided to run.

BTW, there will be a Lt. Governor in NJ starting with the '09 election, so there won't be any more "Acting Governors."

46 posted on 01/16/2007 3:04:13 PM PST by justiceseeker93
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To: Afronaut
The funny thing is that all the Libs are fleeing down here and guess who they vote for? You got it More LIBS!

Yep, typical - - the scumbags foul their own nest and then move away only to continue voting for Democrats.

47 posted on 01/16/2007 3:11:35 PM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: 2banana
This is a great article - my gawd - how liberalism have destroyed the state. But the sheep keep voting them in...

There was a better article about NJ that lays it out in fine detail. It was posted here on FR a while ago. Can't remember the title.

48 posted on 01/16/2007 4:17:19 PM PST by Extremely Extreme Extremist (Why can't Republicans stand up to Democrats like they do to terrorists?)
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To: Lancey Howard
Never say never, if only 35 to 40% of the eligible voters bother to vote we loose, energize the base and we will turn it around.

Again, we need a LEADER, not some RINO putz who believes "it's his turn".
49 posted on 01/16/2007 4:21:55 PM PST by Rumplemeyer
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To: MinnesotaLibertarian
A lot of the damage has been done by the courts, not by the elected officials. Google Mount Laurel II for a good description of how to destroy a wealthy area. A lot of the other damage is done locally. The people rarely vote in the local elections and the politicians know it. They end up dealing with the loud mouths, the ones they know will stir up a storm if they don't get their way. A very small number of people influence the governments there.

I am delighted to have left.

50 posted on 01/16/2007 4:30:05 PM PST by sig226 (See my profile for the democrat culture of corruption list.)
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