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Bacteria In Staph Infections Can Cause Necrotizing Pneumonia (MRSA)
Science Daily ^ | 1-28-2007 | Texas A&M

Posted on 01/28/2007 4:09:37 PM PST by blam

Source: Texas A&M Health Science Center
Date: January 28, 2007

Bacteria In Staph Infections Can Cause Necrotizing Pneumonia

Science Daily — Researchers at the Texas A&M Health Science Center Institute of Biosciences and Technology at Houston have discovered a toxin present in the bacteria responsible for the current nationwide outbreak of staph infections also has a role in an aggressive pneumonia that is often fatal within 72 hours.

"The virulence of CA-MRSA (community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) strains that produce the PVL (Panton Valentine leukocidin) toxin presents a nightmare scenario," said M. Gabriela Bowden, Ph.D., research assistant professor at HSC-IBT and co-senior author. "If the community-acquired strain establishes itself in the hospital setting, it will be difficult to contain."

The most common cause of staph infections, S. aureus is a bacteria found on the skin or in the nose of about 25-30 percent of people. It also can be the culprit in minor skin infections like pimples and boils, as well as major diseases like meningitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome and pneumonia.

In their study, Dr. Bowden and her colleagues at the HSC-IBT Center for Extracellular Matrix Biology used mice to analyze S. aureus Panton Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a pore-forming toxin secreted by bacterial strains associated with both the current outbreak of CA-MRSA and necrotizing pneumonia.

CA-MRSA causes serious skin and soft tissue infections in healthy persons who have not been recently hospitalized or undergone invasive medical procedures, while necrotizing pneumonia destroys healthy lung tissue and can be fatal within 72 hours. With the PVL toxin, the bacterium also attacks infection-fighting white blood cells (leukocytes).

In the 1940s, the high mortality rate from S. aureus was abated by penicillin, but the bacteria soon developed a resistance. Methicillin provided new treatment options for infections in the late 1950s, but as of the late 1990s, it has become resistant.

In December, the United Kingdom had its first documented report of fatal necrotizing pneumonia cases caused by PVL-positive CA-MRSA. Eight hospitalized patients developed infections from CA-MRSA, and two died. It was previously believed the hospitals were free of these virulent strains of CA-MRSA.

Testing several bacterial strains, the HSC-IBT researchers learned PVL itself has an enhanced ability to disrupt cells in the body, and PVL-positive S. aureus has a greater capacity to attach to and colonize the lung, the latter resulting in necrotizing pneumonia.

"Our research shows in vivo that PVL is sufficient to cause pneumonia," Dr. Bowden said. "PVL-producing S. aureus overexpress other factors that enhance inflammation and bacterial attachment to the lung. These combined effects result in a vicious cycle of tissue destruction and inflammation, explaining the rapid onset and lethal outcome of this type of pneumonia."

Using these findings, the next step is additional studies to identify targets for potential development of therapies to treat S. aureus infections, including the PVL-positive strain.

"The present study underscores the aggressiveness of these strains and the urgent need to develop new strategies to battle these infections," Dr. Bowden said.

Other Science Express study contributors from the Center for Extracellular Matrix Biology were Magnus Höök, Ph.D., director and professor; Eric Brown, Ph.D., assistant professor (now at The University of Texas School of Public Health at Houston); Maria Labanderia-Rey, postdoctoral fellow; Vanessa Vazquez, graduate student; and Elena Barbu, graduate student. Florence Couzon, Sandrine Boisset, Michele Bes, Yvonne Benito, Jerome Etienne and François Vandenesch from the University of Lyon and Hospices Civils de Lyon (France) also contributed.

Grants from the HSC, French Ministry of Research, National Institutes of Health, and Neva and Wesley West and Hamill Foundations supported this research.

The Texas A&M Health Science Center provides the state with health education, outreach and research. Its six components located in communities throughout Texas are Baylor College of Dentistry, the College of Medicine, the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the Institute of Biosciences and Technology, the Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, and the School of Rural Public Health.

Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by Texas A&M Health Science Center.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bacteria; diseases; flesheatingbacteria; health; mrsa; pneumonia; pvl; science; staph
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It's always something.
1 posted on 01/28/2007 4:09:38 PM PST by blam
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To: blam
If you go to the gym, have flip-flops on while taking the shower. If they have hot-tubs, don't use them, even if they say the clean them daily.

Staph Infections are not fun.

2 posted on 01/28/2007 4:15:55 PM PST by GulfWar1Vet (Let's go to the Farside....)
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To: blam

"The most common cause of staph infections, S. aureus is a bacteria found on the skin or in the nose of about 25-30 percent of people. It also can be the culprit in minor skin infections like pimples and boils, as well as major diseases like meningitis, endocarditis, toxic shock syndrome and pneumonia."

I had this - staph aureus. It's AWFUL. I had to be on bactrum. It got rid of it. I had cold chills and dizziness.


3 posted on 01/28/2007 4:17:57 PM PST by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God) .)
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Comment #4 Removed by Moderator

To: blam

Guy I work with out at the Festival, over Thanksgiving his girlfriend contracted MRSA and lost their baby.

Then over Christmas, he got it and was in a coma for several days.

This is not to be screwed around with.


5 posted on 01/28/2007 4:19:07 PM PST by Xenalyte (Anything is possible when you don't understand how anything happens.)
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To: GulfWar1Vet

That's why I wash with anti-bacteria soap at the gym.


6 posted on 01/28/2007 4:19:39 PM PST by Perdogg (Happy 2007)
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To: GulfWar1Vet

You know it!

I can't figure out where I got it.

Don't visit sick people. I don't go to hospitals. I'm a stay at home mom and lead a rather dull life. Our local food store has alcohol wipes that I ALWAYS use on the shopping cart handle.

My GP is very concerned because he sees it showing up in more and more "healthy" people in the general population. He's a thorough guy and did the culture just as a precaution - he was as surprised as I was.


7 posted on 01/28/2007 4:24:46 PM PST by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God) .)
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To: Perdogg
I don't anymore. We used to. We use soft soap. Antibacterial stuff is over used. It makes you more susceptible to super bugs. Getting rid of the antibacterial soaps in our house was the first thing I did.
8 posted on 01/28/2007 4:27:51 PM PST by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God) .)
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To: GulfWar1Vet

Too bad hospitals don't know how to clean. Tea Tree Oil kills all staph. There is no need for any staph infections. But hey I bet it's a large part of their income.


9 posted on 01/28/2007 4:29:33 PM PST by mad_as_he$$ (So many geeks so few circuses.)
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To: motormouth

Hey girl, thought you might like to read this. It's quite interesting, scary but interesting.


10 posted on 01/28/2007 4:35:15 PM PST by Shimmer128 (**The best things in life aren't free, they are priceless)
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To: Perdogg
True, but my doc said you can easily get it from shower stalls if you go bareless.

I had to antibiotics and a special liquid soap to rub from neck down to get rid of it.

The staph was on the back of my right thigh.

11 posted on 01/28/2007 4:40:44 PM PST by GulfWar1Vet (Let's go to the Farside....)
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To: nmh

I have transported patients with MRSA and never got it. I wore gloves and washed my hands after. I cleaned the ambulance with care. I wasn't worried about getting it, and I didn't. Luck of the draw?


12 posted on 01/28/2007 4:45:36 PM PST by tioga
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To: mad_as_he$$

This is not true. Tea tree oil can prevent the spread of some bacteria and minor skin infections, even of MRSA. It is not effective in eliminating the threat of MRSA, especially in a hospital setting. I would be the first to agree that hospitals try to gouge patients. I experienced it this weekend. But MRSA scares them. It is impossible to prevent MRSA infections, and there are cases that will only respond to one antibiotic. These infections are bad and scary, and if there was a way to prevent them, the hospitals would be all over it.

By the way, tea tree oil is very, very similar in composition and effect to turpentine.


13 posted on 01/28/2007 4:46:28 PM PST by ga medic
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To: nmh
My husband is just getting over a staph infection that he probably got in the hospital. It took two trips to the ER, two trips to a specialist, and a GP to finally get rid of it.

I thought that he was going to survive the cancer, and die from a staph infection.


We also, recently had a friend recovering from heart surgery, got a staph infection in the hospital and died right there.
14 posted on 01/28/2007 4:58:48 PM PST by Coldwater Creek (The TERRORIST are the ones who won the midterm elections!)
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To: ga medic
My grandmother used to pour turpentine or coal oil on our cuts. Worked every time.
15 posted on 01/28/2007 5:01:13 PM PST by Coldwater Creek (The TERRORIST are the ones who won the midterm elections!)
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To: mariabush

My mom got a staph infection after her second open-heart surgery.....she was allergic to every single antibiotic available to fight it and was taken off each one as symptoms appeared. When there was nothing left to try they said "we wait and see". She survived that and went over a year without any more problems. She eventually died from CHF.


16 posted on 01/28/2007 5:03:46 PM PST by tioga
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To: mariabush

I guess my point is you can fight it. She was frail from her surgery, yet she overcame a staph infection on her heart.


17 posted on 01/28/2007 5:04:30 PM PST by tioga
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To: ga medic
Guess these guys are wrong:

http://www.nelh.nhs.uk/hth/tea_tree.asp

Sorry I am HTML challenged. Cut and paste works. Tea tree oil is used extensively in Australia and the Islands. MRSA there is practically unheard of there. I have suggested to both local hospitals that they establish MRSA isolation wards and that ALL cases suspected of being MRSA get immedaitely screened and isolated. Their response leads me to beleive that they are more greedy than scareed.

I also have a hunch that if ALL the case history of MRSA was correlated there is some lifestyle or personal hygene issues. No data casue it just isn't there but a theory.

18 posted on 01/28/2007 5:05:55 PM PST by mad_as_he$$ (So many geeks so few circuses.)
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To: blam
It's always something.

You're right. As one PBS show on life in the desert said...
"Where there is something that can be eaten...something will appear
that will attempt to eat it."

Having had one bout with MRSA that nearly took my left leg
(and probably my life, if I'd not gotten antibiotics for another
12 hours),
people gotta' be vigilant about any skin rash, especially one
that gets warm to the touch and is accompanied by fever and muscular pain
(well, those were the symptoms with me).

And once you have an episode...be ready for repeat episodes.
(that happened to me and one MD said that's normal).
19 posted on 01/28/2007 5:11:00 PM PST by VOA
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To: blam

One case from the UK involved a soldier who was infected simply from being scratched by vegetation during training exercises. So it's in the wild, outside of hospitals.

Also, you can be a carrier:

http://www.mrsa.uk.com/docs/passed_on.htm

"MRSA can be transmitted from person to person fairly
easily, mainly via the hands. It is important to remember
that MRSA rarely causes problems for fit and healthy
people. Many people carry MRSA without knowing it
and never experience any ill effects. (These people are
said to be colonised with MRSA rather than being
infected with it). In most cases, MRSA only poses a
threat when it has the opportunity to get inside the body
and cause an infection, for example via wounds or surgical
scars."

The hospitals in the UK have their own "special" varieties of MRSA, not found elsewhere:

http://www.4ni.co.uk/nationalnews.asp?id=37552

"The MRSA epidemic plaguing Britain's hospitals may be due to extremely transmissible contagious clones of the superbug, a scientist has claimed.
Dr Mark Enright, from the University of Bath, also said that better hospital hygiene would not be enough to prevent the spread of the infection.
In an article published in this month's edition of 'Microbiology Today', Dr Enright, an expert on the evolution and epidemiology of MRSA, said that the increase of infections in the UK coincided with the appearance of two clones, called UK Epidemic MRSA clone-15 and clone-16. These clones, Dr Enright said, were uncommon elsewhere in the world, and this could explain why MRSA infections had increased in Britain.
Dr Enright said that these clones were more contagious than other strains of the infection and claimed that the only way to stop the epidemic was by using proven measures, such as patient isolation."


20 posted on 01/28/2007 5:17:45 PM PST by LibFreeOrDie (L'Chaim!)
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To: mad_as_he$$

"I also have a hunch that if ALL the case history of MRSA was correlated
there is some lifestyle or personal hygene issues. "

MRSA does seem to prosper anyplace where people are in close quarters
for prolonged periods of times. I read that the Los Angeles jail was
an outbreak site.
And I can't remember his name but one of the players on The Washington
Redskins also got MRSA and was at least out-of-commission for at
least a year.

Virulent staph germ once confined to hospitals emerging in jails, gyms and schools
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1586689/posts


21 posted on 01/28/2007 5:18:45 PM PST by VOA
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To: TigersEye

ping


22 posted on 01/28/2007 5:32:12 PM PST by pandoraou812 ( zero tolerance to the will of Allah ......efg and dilligaf?)
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To: mad_as_he$$

"The newspaper headline, which states that tea tree oil can 'wipe out' the hospital superbug did not reflect either the newspaper or research articles, both of which reported eradication rates of just 41% for tea tree preparations."

The above passage is from the link that you gave me.


MRSA is a serious bacterial problem, and 41% effectiveness isn't going to do much to keep from spreading.

MRSA isolation is not practical as a large percentage of people have it on their skin at any time. Each person that enters the hospital presents another potential exposure. This is why hospitals are so concerned.

MRSA infections are more prevalent in hospitals because people there are sick, which can compromise the immune system, or they have had injuries or surgery, which give the bacteria a route into the body.

As for your theory about hygeine or lifestyle, I disagree. They are finding MRSA in many places that you would not expect it. Locker rooms and fitness clubs are breeding grounds. Schools and playground equipment too. It is far more common than you seem to think. You might even have it yourself.


23 posted on 01/28/2007 5:32:32 PM PST by ga medic
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To: blam
In ‘97 my father had a procedure to correct an arrhythmia. It was an out-patient procedure that involved putting a scope down his throat down his airway into his chest and giving an electrical shock to his heart to put it back into the proper rhythm.

The procedure worked as far as his heart rhythm but about two days later he complained about a constant tickle in his throat that became a nagging cough that a day later developed into a fever and a day later admission into the hospital with sever breathing problems. The next day he was put on a vent and we were told he had bacterial pneumonia. He was on the vent and in intensive care for 8 more weeks until the infection had become so severe and the antibiotics ineffectual and so according to his living will and his express wishes given the hopelessness of the situation, his life support was removed and in less than 24-hours later he passed.

Several doctors at Hopkins questioned me about what happed just before he became ill. I kept telling them about the scope and the procedure but then later I was told it had nothing to do with his illness.

I’ve always wondered if the bacterial pneumonia was a result of the procedure. I didn’t get answers but then I didn’t aggressively pursue at the time either.

My dad was diabetic and so prone to infection and had bacterial meningitis in 92 and it really took a toll on his health.

He got really good care at Hopkins and I can’t complain but I’ve always been nagged that there was something kept from us. A few years ago there was a recall of this type of scope and something having to do with bacterial infections. No one contacted me and it’s probably too late to pursue now but I still wonder….
24 posted on 01/28/2007 5:34:08 PM PST by Caramelgal (Once in his life, every man is entitled to fall madly in love with a gorgeous redhead.)
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To: Xenalyte
My wife got it and they were treating her for a spider bite.After a month,the sores colonized and they finally figured out what was wrong.She had to have intravenous infusions for one week,twice a day.Six in the morning and six at night.Each infusion took three hours.That was two months ago.She had to undergo bladder surgery Friday,and is in bad shape.She has developed pneumonia and not doing to well.She is a strong woman who never drank or smoked in her life.Reading this article sends me to a place I do not want to be.Guess where they gave the infusions at?The emergency room,and I was amazed at how many people were receiving the treatments.After doing some research on it,I found out that a large hospital in a city close by has an entire floor dedicated to treating staph infections.MRSA is a nasty thing to deal with.They are treating her pain with morphine and it does not seem to help the pain.I noticed today that her fingertips were turning blue which I found a little odd.Thanks to the poster of this article,and I apologize for the non paragraphs.I am not to swift at the computer stuff.
25 posted on 01/28/2007 5:38:09 PM PST by xarmydog
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To: mad_as_he$$

I use tea tree oil for many things. It is a great cleaner. I also add it to shampoo. And If you don't have time to give your dog a bath, just add a few drops to a spray bottle with water and spray it on the dogs coat. It works well on cuts and skinned knees just don't use it full strength on your face. I found diluting it is better for my daughter's scrapes. Its great stuff.


26 posted on 01/28/2007 5:39:58 PM PST by pandoraou812 ( zero tolerance to the will of Allah ......efg and dilligaf?)
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To: VOA

I agree with you.Once you have had it,a recurrence is very likely to happen again.I know nurses who have gotten it more than once.I hope you are alright now.


27 posted on 01/28/2007 5:43:34 PM PST by xarmydog
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To: xarmydog

My oldest daughter was bite by a few spiders. She got meningitis and then MRSA. She has had to have these strange lumps removed from her legs since then. Doctors have told her they are MRSA related.

I went to the hospital to see my mother who had MRSA. They had taken the notice off her door to suit up so I didn't. When the nurse saw my sister and I visiting without being suited up she threw us out. She told us to go home , take off our clothes by the washer and wash them ASAP. We then took hot showers. However we folded our coats over the rail near my parrot's cage. A few hours later my parrot fell to the bottom of the cage and died. I think it was from the coats but never proved it. We never came down with the MRSA. However my mom never got rid of it and had more problems until she died. Nursing homes are filled with MRSA and I won't let my daughter bring my grandson there during winter months. At least we can visit outside when the weather is good. MRSA is some nasty stuff to deal with.


28 posted on 01/28/2007 5:52:06 PM PST by pandoraou812 ( zero tolerance to the will of Allah ......efg and dilligaf?)
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To: xarmydog
I hope you are alright now.

Doing pretty good, thanks.
Folks just need to be vigilant and realize MRSA is for real!
29 posted on 01/28/2007 5:53:44 PM PST by VOA
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To: VOA
My wife was fighting off a bad brown recluse bite,when she visited her dad in a hospital I mentioned earlier.We believe we can put the time of exposure to the time of her visit.The misdiagnosis is what made the matter almost unmanageable.After we saw what the tests were and such,I see why they put it off as long as they did.They were expensive and time consuming.As I sat in the room when they lanced the lesions for tests,I could not believe how incredibly stupid the Dr.and the two nurses were in not wearing gloves,let alone wash their hands prior to the procedure.The days of second opinions are over.Try three and four opinions just to be safe.
30 posted on 01/28/2007 5:54:51 PM PST by xarmydog
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To: ga medic
GA medic, Not to say you're wrong, but for the sake of people having a chance at fighting this bug, tea tree oil is going to be an important compound. Here are some references for you to look over:

In vitro activity of tea-tree oil against clinical skin isolates of meticillin-resistant and -sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci growing planktonically and as biofilms Aaron Brady1, Ryan Loughlin1, Deirdre Gilpin1, Paddy Kearney2 and Michael Tunney1 1 Clinical and Practice Research Group, School of Pharmacy, Queen's University Belfast, Medical Biology Centre, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK

2 Microbiology Department, United Hospitals Trust, Antrim, BT41, UK

Correspondence Michael Tunney m.tunney@qub.ac.uk

Received 8 February 2006 Accepted 19 June 2006

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus [meticillin-resistant (MRSA) and meticillin-sensitive (MSSA)] and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), which respectively form part of the transient and commensal skin flora, to tea-tree oil (TTO) was compared using broth microdilution and quantitative in vitro time–kill test methods. MRSA and MSSA isolates were significantly less susceptible than CoNS isolates, as measured by both MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration. A significant decrease in the mean viable count of all isolates in comparison with the control was seen at each time interval in time–kill assays. However, the only significant difference in the overall mean log10 reduction in viable count between the groups of isolates was between CoNS and MSSA at 3 h, with CoNS isolates demonstrating a significantly lower mean reduction. To provide a better simulation of in vivo conditions on the skin, where bacteria are reported to grow as microcolonies encased in glycocalyx, the bactericidal activity of TTO against isolates grown as biofilms was also compared. Biofilms formed by MSSA and MRSA isolates were completely eradicated following exposure to 5 % TTO for 1 h. In contrast, of the biofilms formed by the nine CoNS isolates tested, only five were completely killed, although a reduction in viable count was apparent for the other four isolates. These results suggest that TTO exerts a greater bactericidal activity against biofilm-grown MRSA and MSSA isolates than against some biofilm-grown CoNS isolates. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Abbreviations: CoNS, coagulase-negative staphylococci; ISB, IsoSensitest broth; MBC, minimum bactericidal concentration; MRSA, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; MSSA, meticillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus; MTT, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide; TTO, tea-tree oil

a better experiment

Scroll down to results in the second paper and notice the rapid killing of all mrsa isolates within 3.5 hours. This is huge. Normally, a loading dose of vancomycin would require an entire life cycle of the bug to kill it.

Yes, Tea tree oil may only have an eradication rate of 41%-- but thats not the poing. Vancomycin has an eradication rate of upwards of 83%, but MRSA strains have developed resistance to vancomycin. A prokaryotic cell does not (as far as the literature is concerned) have the ability to generate a resistance to tea tree oil, except for its ability to generate pumps to pump the compounds out of the cell (which hasn't been shown).

In addition, if we're talking mrsa occurence in general, the majority of those infected and/or colonized present with dermatitis (a skin infection). Because tea tree oil can be applied topically, it is very promising to reduce this occurence, and also transmission from colonized hands of healthcare workers. To understand why a colonization redluction of 41% is so significant, you would have to understand the concept of "bacterial load" and environment, which is too complicated to get into here.

If you are a medic, I would highly recommend you carry tea tree oil hand sanitizer or lotion-- it will decrease the risk of you getting mrsa (not by 41%, but by much more than that because of the processes I mentioned above).

Oh, and as far as the hygeine point goes, I certainly believe this has truth-- mrsa would not exist if people weren't so careless about following antibiotic recommendations to the letter from their docs.

31 posted on 01/28/2007 5:57:51 PM PST by skippermd
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To: xarmydog
As I sat in the room when they lanced the lesions for tests,
I could not believe how incredibly stupid the Dr.and the two
nurses were in not wearing gloves,let alone wash their hands prior
to the procedure.The days of second opinions are over.Try
three and four opinions just to be safe.


In my case, you're preaching to the choir.
I have a love-hate affair with MDs.
But for some very good ones, I'd not be here.
Because of some dopey ones, I've suffered a goodly bit.
32 posted on 01/28/2007 5:59:01 PM PST by VOA
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To: xarmydog
Perhaps you should ask about hyperbaric oxygen therapy for her. It has good results in fighting infection: Journal of anesthesia
33 posted on 01/28/2007 6:02:04 PM PST by skippermd
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To: mad_as_he$$
From your article:

"The research article is a very poorly reported trial that provides limited evidence

Even the article didn't conclude what you say it does.

And your gibe about generating business for hospitals is so off the wall and so insulting, not only to medical care workers, but to the people who read the comment, that you should be ashamed.

34 posted on 01/28/2007 6:10:14 PM PST by jammer
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To: pandoraou812
What really got my goat was seeking information on what to do as far as our own measures to rid the house of any left over germs and such.I ended up on the Internet for the info I needed.We are[wife and I]far from well off.Below poverty level,but we keep a clean environment in our home.It cost a pretty penny,but we went through the house with all we had.Anti bacterial everything,cleaned anything and everything,used massive amounts of clorox,etc.Because you may not have a lot of money,does not mean you need to live like pigs.You are right,it is a dreadful thing to have.Especially for the older and infirmed people.Hope all is OK for your family.
35 posted on 01/28/2007 6:14:43 PM PST by xarmydog
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To: xarmydog
The Dr.s kept telling us that my husband had a hematoma (bruise). It was a horrible staph infection. Took over 2 months to get help and treatment, because no one wanted to fool with it.
36 posted on 01/28/2007 6:16:46 PM PST by Coldwater Creek (The TERRORIST are the ones who won the midterm elections!)
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To: VOA
I agree totally with your response.I have had the same experiences.
37 posted on 01/28/2007 6:18:01 PM PST by xarmydog
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To: tioga

I don't know!

No clue.

I do believe that antibiotics in any form are OVER used.


38 posted on 01/28/2007 6:23:58 PM PST by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God) .)
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To: tioga

I don't know!

No clue.

I do believe that antibiotics in any form are OVER used.


39 posted on 01/28/2007 6:24:04 PM PST by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God) .)
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To: mariabush

Staph is very dangerous and people don't realize it - that is most people.


40 posted on 01/28/2007 6:25:15 PM PST by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God) .)
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To: blam; All

Thanks for posting. Thanks to all contributors to this thread. BTTT!


41 posted on 01/28/2007 6:30:13 PM PST by PGalt
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To: skippermd
Thank you for sharing that information with me.I have it book marked just in case.She has been on oxygen,but I do not know if that is adequate enough.It better be.My wife is my world,and a supposedly simple operation is turning into a bad situation.The DR.who is supposed to be world renown can hardly speak English.No big deal except I hate being talked to like I am stupid.He used a glove to demonstrate what he had done to my wife,but I had already downloaded all the info from the net.I had a very good idea of what was going on.The Internet is an amazing way to get info .The one day and home thing is turning into four days and I do not see daylight ahead.Thanks again.
42 posted on 01/28/2007 6:30:53 PM PST by xarmydog
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To: nmh

You said -- "I can't figure out where I got it."

Perhaps you're in the 25-30 percent --

"The most common cause of staph infections, S. aureus is a bacteria found on the skin or in the nose of about 25-30 percent of people."

And you rubbed your nose...

Regards,
Star Traveler


43 posted on 01/28/2007 6:38:18 PM PST by Star Traveler
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To: mad_as_he$$
Too bad hospitals don't know how to clean.

They'd do well to replace all that stainless steel with copper or copper-bearing alloy for counters, sinks, faucets, doorhandles, etc. A copper bearing surface is a hostile environment to MRSA and many other bacterial pathogens.

44 posted on 01/28/2007 6:43:18 PM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
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To: mariabush
It is bad to the point where there are only two antibiotics left that can suppress it if it goes to far.It is way more dangerous than people know.My wife's started with what looked like a bruise,and kept going back.Then there were two,then three,and after a month there were four all centered around her stomach area.I believe she would still be going through this crap until I made it clear that something needed to be done NOW.They knew I meant business and if it had continued very much longer,I would be a widower.And not a happy one.I hope they fixed your husband OK.Reading these post's should be a wake up call.I am astounded at the amount of people who have gotten this.
45 posted on 01/28/2007 6:44:24 PM PST by xarmydog
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To: xarmydog

Thanks....It took a long time for my Mom to pass. Despite her wishes my father and sister kept her on life support for a long time. Since she had Dementia and other health problems.... there was no quality of life anyway. She had been like that for many years. It was very heartbreaking and I wish she had made a living will. My brother and my wishes didn't matter......My daughter is in England studying so I assume things are well so far for her. I hope all is well with your family also. ~~Pandora~~


46 posted on 01/28/2007 6:46:13 PM PST by pandoraou812 ( zero tolerance to the will of Allah ......efg and dilligaf?)
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To: blam

To me the answers are clearly procedural. Anti-bacterial measures during hospital admittance, the return of the "house call", and probably numerous other common-sense measures.


47 posted on 01/28/2007 6:46:54 PM PST by The Duke (I have met the enemy, and he is named 'Apathy'!)
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To: xarmydog
I'm sorry to hear about your situation. I can't imagine how difficult it may be. Just keep in mind that there's no shame in questioning your wife's care-- it makes no one look dumb except the caregiver..

that said, hyperbaric oxygen therapy requires that she goes into a dive tank of sorts (used to treat the bends in divers) depending where you are, they usually are outpatient deals and in major cities. You can't lose anything if you bring it up to the doc, or write a note on a post-it and ask the nurse to put it on your wife's chart (that works great too)

Godspeed

48 posted on 01/28/2007 6:55:02 PM PST by skippermd
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To: pandoraou812

She probably NEVER had ANY spider bites.... it was all MSRA. One of the most common initial symptoms of MSRA are unexplained "spider bites" on the skin - usually mis-diagnosed by Doctors.


49 posted on 01/28/2007 6:56:31 PM PST by KeepUSfree (WOSD = fascism pure and simple.)
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To: jammer

see my post above to ga medic


50 posted on 01/28/2007 6:58:14 PM PST by skippermd
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