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FEMA Wants Over $300M in Katrina Aid Back
1010wins ^ | By FRANK BASS and MICHELLE ROBERTS

Posted on 02/06/2007 4:04:09 AM PST by Calpernia

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- In the neighborhood President Bush visited right after Hurricane Katrina, the U.S. government gave $84.5 million to more than 10,000 households. But Census figures show fewer than 8,000 homes existed there at the time.

Now the government wants back a lot of the money it disbursed across the region.

The Federal Emergency Management Administration has determined nearly 70,000 Louisiana households improperly received $309.1 million in grants, and officials acknowledge those numbers are likely to grow.

In the chaotic period after two deadly hurricanes, Katrina and Rita, slammed the Gulf Coast in 2005 - Katrina making landfall in late August, followed by Rita in late September - federal officials scrambled to provide help in hard-hit areas such as submerged neighborhoods near the French Quarter.

But an Associated Press analysis of government data obtained under the federal Freedom of Information Act suggests the government might not have been careful enough with its checkbook as it gave out nearly $5.3 billion in aid to storm victims. The analysis found the government regularly gave money to more homes in some neighborhoods than the number of homes that actually existed.

The pattern was repeated in nearly 100 neighborhoods damaged by the hurricanes. At least 162,750 homes that didn't exist before the storms may have received a total of more than $1 billion in improper or illegal payments, the AP found.

The AP analysis discovered the government made more home grants than the number of homes in one of every five neighborhoods in the wake of Katrina. After Rita roared ashore, there were more home grants than homes in one of every 10 neighborhoods.

"We don't dispute that more households received expedited assistance in certain zip codes than are listed in the 2000 Census," said David Garratt, FEMA's deputy director for recovery. But he called this "not only justifiable, it's defensible."

Officials say a substantial number of those payments - they cannot say precisely how many - were made legitimately to homes where family members were separated after the storm, such as emergency workers who stayed behind as spouses and children fled. In such cases, a single family could qualify for more than one aid package. Garratt said officials were in a no-win position.

"We were faced with a situation where we had individuals who needed assistance, and needed it now," he said. "If we'd followed the standard procedures, it would have taken weeks."

Garratt acknowledged FEMA wasn't prepared to verify the identities and homes for everyone who needed help. He said the agency had multiple safeguards to ensure proper payments were made to people who applied online. But a new system designed to keep a tight rein on payments to people who telephoned their applications to FEMA was only partially finished when the storms hit, he said.

The Justice Department so far has prosecuted more than 400 people for storm-related fraud, and $18 million has been returned to FEMA or the American Red Cross, according to a recent report by the department's Katrina Fraud Task Force. The bulk of prosecutions have occurred in Louisiana (115), California (79), Texas (50) and Mississippi (46). The amount recovered so far, however, is slight compared with estimates of widespread fraud.

Among those already prosecuted: Lakietha Diann Hall, 35, of Dallas. Prosecutors said Hall and 10 others - including her mother - filed fraudulent assistance applications over the Internet claiming damage to her home in New Orleans. Hall, whom authorities said never lived in Louisiana, received $65,000 in disaster aid, court records show.

The New Orleans apartment complex where Hall claimed she lived was in a neighborhood of 18,100 homes before the storm; FEMA records show the government gave money to more than 21,000 homes there after Katrina.

Hall pleaded guilty to identity theft. She was sentenced in November to 70 months in prison and ordered to pay $100 each month until she repays the U.S. government $83,254 - a court-imposed payment plan that will take nearly 70 years. Her co-defendants were sentenced to anywhere from probation to one year in prison.

Prosecutors also charged Nakia Grimes of Atlanta, who collected $2,000 in emergency aid after she claimed her home near the Louisiana Superdome was damaged. Grimes listed her ZIP code as one reserved for P.O. boxes in that part of New Orleans - and she was one of three such people who received a total of $6,358 in checks. Grimes' check was mailed the same day she filled out her Internet application, court records show.

Investigators said Grimes, 31, also never lived in New Orleans. In March 2006, she was convicted of mail fraud, sentenced to four months' home detention and ordered to pay a $100 fine.

Census figures showing the number of households within ZIP codes don't always correspond precisely with the post office ZIP codes where FEMA sent grant money. But the AP's findings are similar to those of a February report by the Government Accountability Office, which found hurricane aid was used for to pay for guns, strippers and tattoos. The GAO concluded that between $600 million and $1.4 billion was improperly spent on Katrina relief alone.

In one neighborhood GAO scrutinized, at least one person gave an address as a cemetery. Records show FEMA gave 27,924 assistance grants worth $293 million in that neighborhood. The AP's analysis shows only 18,590 homes existed, meaning up to $98 million in aid could have been disbursed improperly or illegally.

Other agencies have moved at a more cautious and deliberative pace awarding assistance money.

The Louisiana Road Home program has handed out fewer than 400 grants to help homeowners return - even though it's received more than 100,000 applications and is under increasing pressure from the governor and anxious homeowners. The Small Business Administration also got off to a slow start, cutting its first check more than a month after Katrina made landfall, despite receiving more than 26,000 applications.

Some south Louisiana residents said fraud was endemic in the chaotic days after the storms. Rick Caravalho, a local man walking across the French Quarter's Jackson Square on a recent morning, described it as "phenomenal." Caravalho lives close to where Bush acknowledged disappointed storm victims during his visit in September 2005.

A government official, Caravalho laughed, recently "was at the front door asking where 2003 Chartres Street was."

"There is no 2003 Chartres Street," he said. "It's a vacant lot."

In St. Bernard Parish, close to where Katrina made landfall south of New Orleans, the floodwaters rose above 20 feet and white FEMA trailers are still parked outside almost every house. Residents there told the same story. Martina Wiggins, waiting for her grandchildren to arrive home from school, said she was denied aid because someone had already applied using her address.

"They gave away the money too fast," Wiggins said bitterly. "A lot of people got money who didn't deserve it."

People who were forced to flee their homes were eligible for a wide range of federal help, ranging from rental assistance to $2,000 debit cards that could be used to replace personal possessions and buy food. Household payments were capped at $26,000.

Under agency rule changes about three weeks after Katrina, FEMA officials decided some separated households could receive aid. These exceptions included adult roommates who were separated, extended families and some adults still living with their families who were forced to evacuate separately. The government considers a "household" to represent all the people - related or otherwise - who live in a housing unit such as a house, apartment or mobile home.

Still, advocates said thousands of people in separated homes were improperly denied aid or never heard about the rule change. Catherine Bendor of the National Law Center on Homelessness and Poverty said a federal court ruling in June criticized FEMA for not giving enough information to people applying for aid. But coming nearly a year after the storm, she said, the ruling comes too late for the majority of people who needed help.

"The application of the rule has been uneven and arbitrary," she said. "It appears they were making decisions on a case-by-case basis. So it's caused a lot of frustration. There were a lot of individuals who never should have been denied assistance."

In some cases, FEMA is still trying to collect refunds from individuals who improperly received more than one grant or who were ineligible for assistance. But for people like Keshian Mitchell, a 17-year-old Katrina refugee living in a dismal apartment complex in west Houston, it's small comfort.

"They ain't no help now," said Mitchell, who didn't find her parents until six months after Katrina laid waste to New Orleans. "Nobody's getting any more help - they already spent all the money."

Crystal Dixon, who lives near Mitchell, agreed. Dixon, 25, said she saw people bilk taxpayers while she fought for basic assistance to help feed and clothe her five children, ages 1 to 10.

She met one woman who had moved to Houston two years before the storm but kept her Louisiana driver's license. The woman, who had no children, got cash assistance before Dixon was helped, Dixon said.

"I try to understand how confused things got," said Dixon. Her children played outside and chattered excitedly about nearly falling off a roof into flood-swollen streets, being rescued by a Coast Guard helicopter and scrounging for food and water at the overcrowded Superdome. "But I thought everyone should have been treated equally."

Cedric Miller, a 34-year-old busboy at a New Orleans restaurant, said FEMA officials seemed to be reacting as best they could to the devastation. But Miller also said: "There was a lot of fraud going on. ... There was a whole lot of that going on. It was a big ol' way-drawn-out mess."

---


TOPICS: Extended News; US: Louisiana
KEYWORDS: fema; katrina; rita

1 posted on 02/06/2007 4:04:11 AM PST by Calpernia
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To: Calpernia

Trying to get money back from these deadbeats will be like trying to poke butter up a wildcat's ass with a red hot poker.

Good Luck!


2 posted on 02/06/2007 4:12:50 AM PST by DH (The government writes no bill that does not line the pockets of special interests.)
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To: Calpernia

I want a 36 inch waistline too, but I think I will be modeling for Calvin Kline before Uncle Sam sees a nickle back.


3 posted on 02/06/2007 4:14:30 AM PST by spikeytx86 (Pray for Democrats for they have been brainwashed by their fruity little club.)
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To: Calpernia

Typical.

There has been a constant drumbeat of criticism of FEMA, and attacks on Bush, about how FEMA did not react quickly enough. Now that the extent of the fraud is being revealed, there will be constant criticism about waste.


4 posted on 02/06/2007 4:14:48 AM PST by jimtorr
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To: DH

Check Jefferson's freezer again.


5 posted on 02/06/2007 4:16:46 AM PST by Thrownatbirth (.....when the sidewalks are safe for the little guy.)
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To: Calpernia
I lost track of the number of times I said "No sh**." while reading this.

L

6 posted on 02/06/2007 4:17:59 AM PST by Lurker (Europeans killed 6 million Jews. As a reward they got 40 million Moslems. Karma's a bitch.)
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To: Calpernia

Funny --

The people who squawked, at the time, for the Gummint to cover Louisiana waist-deep in dollar bills, and that would make everything all better.....

Are now finding out that "waist deep" means "waste deep" -- and there's nothing "all better" about it.....


7 posted on 02/06/2007 4:18:59 AM PST by Uncle Ike (Aspiring Guru Seeks Disciples and Admiring Followers -- apply within)
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To: Calpernia

Wait! I thought all the money that could have gone to Louisiana went to Iraq instead.


8 posted on 02/06/2007 4:21:28 AM PST by Dahoser (Never question Mr. Nibbles!)
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To: Calpernia
At least 162,750 homes that didn't exist before the storms may have received a total of more than $1 billion in improper or illegal payments, the AP found.

But...but...the federal government was racist in not supplying enough funds to Katrina victims.

9 posted on 02/06/2007 4:23:17 AM PST by Zack Nguyen
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To: Calpernia
Dixon, 25, said she saw people bilk taxpayers while she fought for basic assistance to help feed and clothe her five children, ages 1 to 10.

She had her first kid at 15. She never had a chance.

L

10 posted on 02/06/2007 4:25:18 AM PST by Lurker (Europeans killed 6 million Jews. As a reward they got 40 million Moslems. Karma's a bitch.)
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To: Calpernia

This is what happens when the government passes out money in a big hurry based on media and Democrat party hype and guilt. When it comes to Katrina, no sound judgement was used, which opened up huge opportunities for defrauding the American taxpayers. I am still waiting for sanity to someday return to this nation.


11 posted on 02/06/2007 4:30:10 AM PST by dforest (Liberals love crisis, create crisis and then dwell on them.)
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To: Calpernia

Good luck getting it back from the guy my buddy used to work with. He got his fraud check and smoked himself to death on crack within a week. Good investment for the gov imo.


12 posted on 02/06/2007 4:35:21 AM PST by Dosa26 (It is purpose that created us, that connects us, that pulls us, that guides us, that drives us)
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To: Calpernia
Other than pay for infrastructure and restore basic services, there should have been zero tax dollars to NOLA. Just declare the area a tax-free enterprise zone and let the private sector work its magic.

NOLA would have been up and running by now, IMO.

13 posted on 02/06/2007 4:40:42 AM PST by Extremely Extreme Extremist
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To: DH

THAT was funny!


14 posted on 02/06/2007 4:41:48 AM PST by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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Let's not forget this tidbit:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1493302/posts
FR Exclusive: John Kerry, Mary Landrieu, MoveOn DNC and Katrina


15 posted on 02/06/2007 4:45:40 AM PST by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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To: Extremely Extreme Extremist
Other than pay for infrastructure and restore basic services, there should have been zero tax dollars to NOLA

Declare the city a national security asset and put it under the military industrial diumvaratte with limited local control. If they don't like it declare it a military reserve. The people there have failed to administer it properly. I'm in a bad mood.

16 posted on 02/06/2007 4:50:20 AM PST by Dosa26 (It is purpose that created us, that connects us, that pulls us, that guides us, that drives us)
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To: DH
...and she was one of three such people who received a total of $6,358 in checks.

In March 2006, she was convicted of mail fraud, sentenced to four months' home detention and ordered to pay a $100 fine.

All in all, I'd say that crime paid for Ms. Grimes.

17 posted on 02/06/2007 5:01:24 AM PST by beaversmom
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To: Calpernia

Nothing like "closing the barn door after the horse is gone".


18 posted on 02/06/2007 5:04:49 AM PST by PBRSTREETGANG
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To: DH
Trying to get money back from these deadbeats will be like trying to poke butter up a wildcat's ass with a red hot poker.

Or like drilling a hole in water.

19 posted on 02/06/2007 5:07:32 AM PST by DungeonMaster (Acts 17:11 also known as sola scriptura.)
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To: indylindy
This is what happens when the government passes out money in a big hurry based on media and Democrat party hype and guilt. When it comes to Katrina, no sound judgement was used, which opened up huge opportunities for defrauding the American taxpayers. I am still waiting for sanity to someday return to this nation.

This is what happens when the government has toooooo much money. Defrauding continues to this day by the government incompetents.

Last week I was driving U.S.59 through Mississippi. At Purvis, Mississippi on the side of the road were acres and acres of FEMA camper type trailors. These are parked about 2 to 3 feet apart without any hookup as no one is living in them. The rolling land is white with these trailors. Unreal! I have been told that the owner of this land gets $1 per trailor per day for parking. This is a sweetheart deal which is a little different from fraud. LOL

20 posted on 02/06/2007 5:17:29 AM PST by texastoo ("trash the treaties")
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To: texastoo
Nothing surprises me anymore. You know, each day it is getting harder to listen to those we have elected. I don't think any of them have any idea what to do about anything. They have no sense of responsibility and are morally clueless. It appears they just run constant back to back election cycles which keeps any of them from doing the job they are supposed to do. As for the trailers. I guess it is looked at as, why worry? Its just the taxpayers money. The incompetence is so blatant.
21 posted on 02/06/2007 5:58:09 AM PST by dforest (Liberals love crisis, create crisis and then dwell on them.)
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To: Calpernia

I live in Southern California but still own my house in Lake Jackson Texas right on the Gulf Coast. My 25 year old son lives in our house while we are gone (Husband is on assignment here as a Dow Chemical Engineer) We didn't lose a tree or a fence or a window or a shingle in the 2005 hurricanes. But I hear EVERY DAY in California that the entire Gulf Coast was destroyed by the hurricanes. I tell people that Galveston and Houston were spared they are fine. Lake Jackson was spared and it is fine. Then one gal asked me "Have you been back to your house to check on it?" I guess she thinks I just don't know that my house was destroyed. Yes I have been back to my house about four times a year and it is just fine. I guess the news media kept saying the Gulf Coast was declared a disaster area and Californians assume it means the entire coast. I keep trying to explain, NO, it is just in the areas where the storm hit. We were on the dry/clean side of both storms.


22 posted on 02/06/2007 8:20:00 AM PST by buffyt (FREE BORDER AGENTS IGNACIO RAMOS & JOSE CAMPEAN NOW!!!!!!!!!! PLEASE!!!!!!!!)
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To: buffyt

The propaganda is touted here too (East Coast).

They are groups STILL collecting for "Katrina Victims".


23 posted on 02/06/2007 8:23:44 AM PST by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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To: Dahoser

IMO, the money should be left there. Keep track of how it's spent, by whom is it spent, and on what is it spent on. If it's seen to have been used on anything other than its intended purpose, NOLA shouldn't get one red cent more. This would hurt the truly deserving, and maybe the voters there will wake up and kick the Nagins and Blancos out of office and get more resposible people in there to do the job they're elected to do and not line their own greedy pockets. Let it serve to be an object lesson in post-disaster relief.

I am not insensitive to the plight of those in NOLA. I look at it as though the elected are stealing from me when the relief funds are used to feather their own beds. That's when changes have to be made.


24 posted on 02/06/2007 8:51:13 AM PST by NCC-1701 (Put an end to organized crime. Abolish the IRS.)
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To: buffyt

"We were on the dry/clean side of both storms."

Then Houston must have been on the emptied vacuum/cleaner bag side...


25 posted on 02/06/2007 8:59:28 AM PST by Old Professer (The critic writes with rapier pen, dips it twice, and writes again.)
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To: nepppen

Ping from your question on the Duncan Hunter thread.

Here is an update on Katrina/New Orleans.


26 posted on 02/06/2007 10:11:56 AM PST by Calpernia (Breederville.com)
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To: Lurker
Dixon, 25, said she saw people bilk taxpayers while she fought for basic assistance to help feed and clothe her five children, ages 1 to 10.

Ah yes, the old, "I'm a good person - it's all of them that are the crooks!" bit. I'm sure she conveniently forgot to show the "journalist" the Gucci handbag she bought with her $2000 debit card.

27 posted on 02/06/2007 10:15:55 AM PST by CFC__VRWC (Go Gators! NCAA Football and Basketball Champions!)
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