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Baseball Card Bought For Record $2.3 Million (1909 Honus Wagner Card)
CBS5 ^ | Feb 26, 2007

Posted on 02/27/2007 2:38:46 AM PST by nickcarraway

The "Holy Grail of baseball cards," the famous 1909 Honus Wagner tobacco card once owned by hockey great Wayne Gretzky, has sold for a record-setting $2,350,000, the seller of the card said Monday.

The anonymous buyer has only been identified as a Southern California collector. SCP Auctions Inc., a company that holds sports memorabilia auctions, said it bought a small share of the card. It is scheduled to be shown at a news conference at Dodger Stadium Tuesday.

There are about 60 of the tobacco cards in existence featuring the Pittsburgh Pirates shortstop, one of the first five players to be inducted in Baseball's Hall of Fame.

The seller, Brian Seigel, paid a then-record $1,265,000 in 2000 for the prize card, which is in much better shape than the others.

"This particular one was preserved in spectacular condition," said Joe Orlando, president of Professional Sports Authenticator of Newport Beach -- the company that certified the authenticity of the card. "It's the Holy Grail of baseball cards."

Still, the Wagner cards are so rare that even tattered ones will sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars, Seigel said.

The others "you could stick in the middle of the street and let cars drive over it through the day, take it in your hand and crumple it up, and it still would be a $100,000 card," said Seigel, CEO of Emerald Capital LLC, an asset management company, who lives in Las Vegas.

Gretzky and Bruce McNall, former owner of the Los Angeles Kings, bought the card for $451,000 in 1991.

During his ownership of the card, Seigel displayed it at several sports collectible shows, showed it at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum and brought it to opening bell ceremonies for the NASDAQ stock exchange in New York.

"The Wagner card gave me a tremendous amount of pride, excitement and pleasure," he said. "I hope the new owner will have the same satisfaction I enjoyed over the years."

The tobacco cards used to be included in packs of cigarettes. Collectors believe Wagner's cards are rare because he stopped allowing the American Tobacco Co. to use his image, fearing it would encourage children to smoke.

Nicknamed the "Flying Dutchman," Wagner was the National League batting champion in eight of his 21 seasons and finished his career with a lifetime .329 average. He retired in 1917 with more hits, runs, RBIs, doubles, triples and steals than any National League player.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: baseball; cards; honuswagner; mlb; wagner

1 posted on 02/27/2007 2:38:49 AM PST by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway

If only I had kept that damn shoebox. :-(


2 posted on 02/27/2007 2:50:52 AM PST by Thrownatbirth (.....when the sidewalks are safe for the little guy.)
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To: nickcarraway

My great-grandfather is on baseball cards of that era. I'm not into baseball, but I keep an eye out for one of his cards- it'd be a cool family-history keepsake.


3 posted on 02/27/2007 3:01:41 AM PST by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: Riley

That's a 'WOW'! What was his name and who did he play for?


4 posted on 02/27/2007 3:27:22 AM PST by moonman
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To: nickcarraway

He said Honus!
Like, what's up Honus?
Heh-Heh. That's Cool.


5 posted on 02/27/2007 3:30:54 AM PST by billorites (freepo ergo sum)
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To: moonman
That's a 'WOW'! What was his name and who did he play for?

His name was Fred Carroll.

"Frederick Herbert (Fred) Carroll (July 2, 1864 - November 7, 1904) was a catcher and outfielder in Major League Baseball. From 1884 through 1891, he played with the Columbus Buckeyes (1884) and for the Pittsburgh teams Alleghenys (1885-89), Burghers (1890) and Pirates (1891). Carroll batted and threw right handed. He was born in Sacramento, California."
(Wikipedia)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Carroll

6 posted on 02/27/2007 3:36:08 AM PST by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: nickcarraway

Bet my Jim O'Rourke card is worth more!


7 posted on 02/27/2007 3:51:24 AM PST by AZRepublican ("The degree in which a measure is necessary can never be a test of the legal right to adopt it.")
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To: nickcarraway
The card in question....


8 posted on 02/27/2007 4:00:09 AM PST by xp38
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To: nickcarraway

Every time that card changes hands, the IRS gets a piece of it.


9 posted on 02/27/2007 4:03:32 AM PST by Fresh Wind (Vaclav Klaus: "A whip of political correctness strangles their voice")
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To: Fresh Wind

How does that work? Is it a capital gain?


10 posted on 02/27/2007 4:22:33 AM PST by angkor
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To: angkor

I have an old Hector Lopez card from the 1961 New York Yankess.

Does anyone know how much that is worth?


11 posted on 02/27/2007 4:26:57 AM PST by DeerfieldObserver
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To: nickcarraway

Now watch the buyer's mother throw it away the next time she cleans his room.


12 posted on 02/27/2007 4:31:23 AM PST by tlb
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To: DeerfieldObserver

13 posted on 02/27/2007 4:32:34 AM PST by BushMeister ("We are a nation that has a government - not the other way around." --Ronald Reagan)
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To: angkor

Yes, it is a capital gain. As I understand the tax code, the profit (less expenses) will be taxed at a 28% rate.


14 posted on 02/27/2007 4:37:57 AM PST by Fresh Wind (Vaclav Klaus: "A whip of political correctness strangles their voice")
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To: Riley

Thanks. Very interesting, indeed. Shame he died at such a young age of 40.


15 posted on 02/27/2007 4:40:23 AM PST by moonman
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To: nickcarraway
The anonymous buyer has only been identified as a Southern California collector.

Idiots, I'm from Texas and currently live in Alabama. Get it right!
16 posted on 02/27/2007 5:18:11 AM PST by Jaysun (I took one look at her unfashionable eyebrows and thought to myself, "she's literally crazy.")
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To: Riley
My great-grandfather is on baseball cards of that era. I'm not into baseball, but I keep an eye out for one of his cards- it'd be a cool family-history keepsake.

What's his name?
17 posted on 02/27/2007 5:20:02 AM PST by Jaysun (I took one look at her unfashionable eyebrows and thought to myself, "she's literally crazy.")
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To: Fresh Wind
Yes, it is a capital gain. As I understand the tax code, the profit (less expenses) will be taxed at a 28% rate.

I thought it was 15%.
18 posted on 02/27/2007 5:21:22 AM PST by Jaysun (I took one look at her unfashionable eyebrows and thought to myself, "she's literally crazy.")
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To: DeerfieldObserver

I have a Fleer Billy Ripkin "face" card. Sorry, don't even ask.... I ain't sellin' ;-)


19 posted on 02/27/2007 5:28:52 AM PST by Hatteras
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To: DeerfieldObserver
Go to a store that sells magazines and look for Beckett's Baseball. Your card will be in there with price ranges depending upon condition.

I currently do not have a Beckett's or I would have gladly looked it up for you.

Hope this helps!
20 posted on 02/27/2007 5:28:52 AM PST by Leo Farnsworth
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To: nickcarraway

I think this is the card that someone found in a couch about ten years ago.


21 posted on 02/27/2007 5:29:02 AM PST by cyclotic (Support Cub Scouting-Raising boys to be men, and politically incorrect at the same time.)
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To: DeerfieldObserver
E-Bay is our friend...
22 posted on 02/27/2007 5:31:26 AM PST by Hatteras
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To: BushMeister

Neat, putting the Mick in the dugout!


23 posted on 02/27/2007 5:34:48 AM PST by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: Riley

Wow, you're related to Carroll? For a time, he was arguably the best catcher in baseball. Carroll still holds the record for most hits in a doubleheader (with 9, tied with a few other players), and might hold others that I don't know of. Great player, but got hurt young.


24 posted on 02/27/2007 5:37:27 AM PST by SpringheelJack
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To: Jaysun

Quite right. Plus your state. MA is 5.3%. Combined, then, for the long term gain, would be 20.3.


25 posted on 02/27/2007 5:44:17 AM PST by Plymouth Sentinel (Sooner Rather Than Later)
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To: Hatteras
Don't get me started.

I had about 50-60 pre-1920 American Chickle Co. bubblegum cards (Nellie Fox, Mel Ott, Tris Speaker, Honus Wagner..) from my grandfather. The players' pictures were done in watercolors - Tris Speaker looked like John Daly. The box got lost in a move in the mid-60's.

I could've bought my own island. :-(
26 posted on 02/27/2007 5:52:01 AM PST by Thrownatbirth (.....when the sidewalks are safe for the little guy.)
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To: nickcarraway
"Nicknamed the "Flying Dutchman," Wagner was the National League batting champion in eight of his 21 seasons and finished his career with a lifetime .329 average. He retired in 1917 with more hits, runs, RBIs, doubles, triples and steals than any National League player."

The Flying Dutchman was also a sailing ship found sailing with no one on board. Nothing was missing, so there were no pirates aboard. Weird, huh?

27 posted on 02/27/2007 5:54:36 AM PST by Slip18
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To: Thrownatbirth
I've told this story before but one of my best friends growing up had a boy who was heading off to college. His mom (the boy's grandma) bought a college study desk set for her grandson. To jazz the set up she found a box of my buddy's old baseball cards and shellacked them to the trash can and lamp shade of the desk set for that "special touch".

My buddy cringed as he looked over the trashcan and lamp shade. A couple of Nolan Ryan rookies, Tom Seaver rookies (2), Reggie Jackson rookie, Bench rookies (2) and a host of other stars were scattered among the commons from '67 through '70.

Not quite worth an island but still... ;-)

28 posted on 02/27/2007 6:20:11 AM PST by Hatteras
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To: Jaysun
I thought it was 15%.

Nope. Thanks to the US Congress, when the capital gains rates were adjusted down, they specifically exempted collectibles. So, if you happen to be in a lower tax bracket, if you sell a collectible after holding it for less than a year, the profit is taxed at the same rate as ordinary income. If you hold it for a year or more, it is taxed at 28%. So, unless you are in the higher tax brackets, by holding a collectible long term, you actually pay at a higher rate. Thanks, Congress.

29 posted on 02/27/2007 6:23:00 AM PST by Fresh Wind (Vaclav Klaus: "A whip of political correctness strangles their voice")
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To: Hatteras

Wow, amazing! Exactly what I remember from 46 years ago.


It is a steal at 99 cents!


30 posted on 02/27/2007 6:30:19 AM PST by DeerfieldObserver
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To: nickcarraway

I wonder what my shoe box full of Mike Lum cards will be worth in the future? I think I got a Mike Lum and Nelson Briles in every pack.

I'll bet I've got every print they made.


31 posted on 02/27/2007 6:36:39 AM PST by Gunflint
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To: Jaysun
What's his name?

Fred Carroll- Post 6.

32 posted on 02/27/2007 3:28:25 PM PST by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: SpringheelJack
Wow, you're related to Carroll? For a time, he was arguably the best catcher in baseball. Carroll still holds the record for most hits in a doubleheader (with 9, tied with a few other players), and might hold others that I don't know of. Great player, but got hurt young.

I've seen pages of baseball stats on him- which are meaningless to me. Thanks for shedding some light on his career for me- it means a lot.

After he got out of baseball, he had a shipping business in San Francisco, until he passed away in 1904. He died of heart disease at about the same age that I had a bypass. Runs in the family, I guess.

33 posted on 02/27/2007 3:32:38 PM PST by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: SpringheelJack
Great player, but got hurt young.

Was he injured? Do you have any more info on this?

34 posted on 02/27/2007 3:38:56 PM PST by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: Riley
Was he injured? Do you have any more info on this?

He had a hand injury in 1891, according to "The New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract" pg. 421, and because of it couldn't play catcher anymore. James doesn't specify how the injury occurred, or what exactly it was. He tried being an outfielder for a year, but had a bad season, and was dumped by his team. He played baseball in some California minor leagues for a few years after that though, until 1895.

35 posted on 02/27/2007 4:32:02 PM PST by SpringheelJack
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To: Fresh Wind
Nope. Thanks to the US Congress, when the capital gains rates were adjusted down, they specifically exempted collectibles. So, if you happen to be in a lower tax bracket, if you sell a collectible after holding it for less than a year, the profit is taxed at the same rate as ordinary income. If you hold it for a year or more, it is taxed at 28%. So, unless you are in the higher tax brackets, by holding a collectible long term, you actually pay at a higher rate. Thanks, Congress.

I didn't know that. Thanks.
36 posted on 02/27/2007 5:03:41 PM PST by Jaysun (I took one look at her unfashionable eyebrows and thought to myself, "she's literally crazy.")
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To: nickcarraway

update thread here http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1892909/posts


37 posted on 09/07/2007 6:54:49 PM PDT by xp38
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