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What is the most convoluted, opaque, impenetrable book you ever read?
Blind Eye Jones

Posted on 03/09/2007 11:22:35 PM PST by Blind Eye Jones

What is the most convoluted, opaque, impenetrable book you ever read?


TOPICS: Your Opinion/Questions
KEYWORDS: books; zenandtheartofmotorc
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1 posted on 03/09/2007 11:22:37 PM PST by Blind Eye Jones
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To: Blind Eye Jones

I know what thread I'd vote for.


2 posted on 03/09/2007 11:23:28 PM PST by REDWOOD99
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To: Blind Eye Jones

The book of Revelation in the Bible. Give it a look-see.


3 posted on 03/09/2007 11:23:31 PM PST by Kevmo (Duncan Hunter just needs one Rudy G Campaign Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVBtPIrEleM)
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To: Blind Eye Jones

Anything by a Russian


4 posted on 03/09/2007 11:25:11 PM PST by Dirtysnowbank
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To: Blind Eye Jones
Anything by a Frenchman.
5 posted on 03/09/2007 11:25:50 PM PST by starbase (Understanding Written Propaganda (click "starbase" to learn 22 manipulating tricks!!))
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To: Blind Eye Jones
A couple that occur to me:

Foucault's Pendulum - Umberto Eco
Finnegan's Wake - James Joyce
6 posted on 03/09/2007 11:26:38 PM PST by AnotherUnixGeek
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To: Blind Eye Jones

Modern- anything by Jonathan Franzen. The guy's overrated.


7 posted on 03/09/2007 11:27:27 PM PST by RushCrush (Trust in God but tie your camel well.)
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To: Kevmo
The book of Revelation in the Bible. Give it a look-see.

I know what you mean. I even read a book by a Biblical scholar with his interpretation of the Book of Revelation and was just as confused after reading that as I was before.

8 posted on 03/09/2007 11:28:31 PM PST by Allegra (Hey! Quiet Down Out There!)
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To: Blind Eye Jones
Finnegan's Wake - James Joyce

Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson - G.I. Gurdjieff

9 posted on 03/09/2007 11:28:46 PM PST by Mr. Mojo
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To: Blind Eye Jones

I gave Kant's Critique of Pure Reason a shot. It was totally impenetrable.


10 posted on 03/09/2007 11:28:57 PM PST by saganite
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To: Blind Eye Jones
Laws of Form - G. Spencer-Brown
11 posted on 03/09/2007 11:29:06 PM PST by Jeff Gordon (History convinces me that bad government results from too much government. - Thomas Jefferson)
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To: Blind Eye Jones

Oh, this looks like a fun thread.


12 posted on 03/09/2007 11:30:26 PM PST by Irish Rose (Will work for chocolate.)
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To: Blind Eye Jones
Satanic Verses comes to mind. Bought that to see what all the fuss was about back when it came out.

Just didn't see it. Having a price put on one's head does wonders for book sales, though. ;-)

13 posted on 03/09/2007 11:30:41 PM PST by Allegra (Hey! Quiet Down Out There!)
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To: Blind Eye Jones

Try this one, it's mindblowing:

"IF ON A WINTER'S NIGHT A TRAVELER"

by Italo Calvino

The reader becomes the central character.


14 posted on 03/09/2007 11:31:23 PM PST by SaxxonWoods (Boycott all Leftist Media, ignore them and they will go away...)
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To: Blind Eye Jones

Das Kapital, in its original German.


15 posted on 03/09/2007 11:32:18 PM PST by GSlob
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To: Blind Eye Jones
I'd have to give the vote to Hypnerotomachia Poliphili by the Renaissance Italian architect author Francesco Colonna. Its written in a rather convoluted Italian replate with Greek and Latin derivatives. It prefigures surrealism and is opaque and obscure. You have to know a great deal about ancient literature and languages, math and architectural elements to fully appreciate the work. And the writer's ornate expressions can get tiring at times for modern readers.
16 posted on 03/09/2007 11:32:33 PM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: Blind Eye Jones

Microsoft tcp/ip.


17 posted on 03/09/2007 11:32:37 PM PST by ARE SOLE (Agents Ramos and Campean are in prison at this very moment.)
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To: SaxxonWoods

whoa trippy


18 posted on 03/09/2007 11:33:22 PM PST by expatguy (http://laotze.blogspot.com/)
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To: SaxxonWoods

whoa trippy


19 posted on 03/09/2007 11:33:24 PM PST by expatguy (http://laotze.blogspot.com/)
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To: Blind Eye Jones
What is the most convoluted, opaque, impenetrable book you ever read?

Alice in Wonderland

20 posted on 03/09/2007 11:33:26 PM PST by EndWelfareToday (Live free and keep what you earn. - Tancredo or Hunter)
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To: Blind Eye Jones

great thread


21 posted on 03/09/2007 11:34:07 PM PST by Tainan (Talk is cheap. Silence is golden. All I got is brass...lotsa brass.)
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To: Blind Eye Jones
The Gulag Archipelligo
22 posted on 03/09/2007 11:34:44 PM PST by BnBlFlag (Deo Vindice/Semper Fidelis "Ya gotta saddle up your boys; Ya gotta draw a hard line")
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To: BnBlFlag

Atlas Shrugged


23 posted on 03/09/2007 11:37:25 PM PST by DryFly
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To: starbase
It took me 26 years to finish The Plague by Camus.

Started it 4 times. Finally read it through and gave the book away to a coworker, telling him not to return it.

24 posted on 03/09/2007 11:37:25 PM PST by OwenKellogg
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To: Blind Eye Jones

James Joyce's "Finnegan's Wake." Just way too obscure. "A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man" and "Ulysses" are great, though. "Finnegan's Wake" makes Gibbon's "Decline and Fall" seem like light summer reading.


25 posted on 03/09/2007 11:37:36 PM PST by KellyAdmirer
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To: Blind Eye Jones

Marvin K.Mooney Will You Please Go Now!


26 posted on 03/09/2007 11:41:32 PM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: DryFly

I second that! Just got rid of my copy. That and DaVinci code- I thought they were obtuse.


27 posted on 03/09/2007 11:42:15 PM PST by RushCrush (Trust in God but tie your camel well.)
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To: Allegra
Satanic Verses comes to mind. Bought that to see what all the fuss was about back when it came out.

Just didn't see it. Having a price put on one's head does wonders for book sales, though. ;-)


Rushdie's birthplace, Bombay, plays a big part in that novel as it does in several of his other novels, so familiarity with the city, it's neighborhoods, it's slang, and Bollywood films helps a lot. An understanding of Islam and it's myths is also helpful. Along with Midnight's Children and The Moor's Last Sigh, it's one of my favorite Rushdie novels.

But it isn't an easy read. I'd be amazed if any of the Iranian mullahs who sentenced Rushdie to death had ever read it, let alone understood it.
28 posted on 03/09/2007 11:42:18 PM PST by AnotherUnixGeek
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To: Blind Eye Jones

'Gravity's Rainbow' by Thomas Pynchon


29 posted on 03/09/2007 11:43:31 PM PST by Lancey Howard
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To: Blind Eye Jones
Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon.

[from Wikipedia}

In 1974, the three-member Pulitzer Prize jury on fiction supported Gravity's Rainbow for the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. However, the other eleven members of the board overturned this decision, branding the book "unreadable, turgid, overwritten, and obscene."

I concurred with the eleven members and consigned my paperback copy to an outhouse in Maine, in hope of transforming it into something useful before the pages returned to their original source.

30 posted on 03/09/2007 11:44:51 PM PST by Covenantor
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To: Blind Eye Jones
The book of myself? :-)
31 posted on 03/09/2007 11:45:12 PM PST by RunningWolf (2-1 Cav 1975)
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To: KellyAdmirer
A la Recherche du Temps Perdu. Marcel Proust's In Search Of Lost Time never gets easier whether on the first read or the hundredth as a result of the author's long and labrinthine sentences that seem to meander on forever. Each sentence contains a complete thought and sometimes a complex thought is expressed in a run on way to capture the full force of its import. The 3,000 page novel is the greatest attempt ever to capture a human lifetime in its totality.
32 posted on 03/09/2007 11:45:15 PM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: Covenantor
Anything by Pynchon (possibly excepting The Crying of Lot 49)
33 posted on 03/09/2007 11:45:44 PM PST by WingBolt
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To: Lancey Howard
"Quiet Flows the Don', read all five books of it. It about Russiaand there sure were a lot of Vitches around. But strange thing is I enjoyed it
34 posted on 03/09/2007 11:45:56 PM PST by BooBoo1000 (Some times I wake up grumpy, other times I let her sleep/)
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To: Lancey Howard

LOL! I was still editing while you posted.


35 posted on 03/09/2007 11:45:56 PM PST by Covenantor
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To: AnotherUnixGeek


that's funny. I was thinking about Foucault's pendulum myself, except I didn't technically read it - not more than the first couple of chapters anyway, just couldn't get through it. And I did so enjoy the Name of the Rose


36 posted on 03/09/2007 11:47:01 PM PST by Mom MD (The scorn of fools is music to the ears of the wise)
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To: Blind Eye Jones
Ulysses by James Joyce.

Regards, Ivan

37 posted on 03/09/2007 11:47:46 PM PST by MadIvan (I aim to misbehave.)
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To: Kevmo

As a Christian I've read it beginning to end several times. There are parts of it I can understand; others are totally obscure. (Mark of the Beast, anyone?) And I find it impossible to unify all that's in Revelation, and all other End Time prophecies, into a clear, complete understanding of the End Times.

Although comprehensible, much of Paul's writing is also very deep. There are passages I have to read slowly. Christianity is not a simple religion.


38 posted on 03/09/2007 11:47:59 PM PST by Irish Rose (Will work for chocolate.)
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To: OwenKellogg
It took me 26 years to finish The Plague by Camus.

Wow! I flipped through a few of the hundreds and hundreds of pages of Les Miserables, and Notre Dame de Paris, which is the rather uninspired French title of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame".

Beyond that, French novels are always threatening to spin off in philosophical directions which could only interest a cynical Frenchman! Mon Dieu!
39 posted on 03/09/2007 11:48:03 PM PST by starbase (Understanding Written Propaganda (click "starbase" to learn 22 manipulating tricks!!))
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To: AnotherUnixGeek
An understanding of Islam and it's myths is also helpful.

Well, I have a bit of a grasp on that. And while I haven't been to Bombay, I have enjoyed other novels set in India, particularly during the time of the British Raj. M.M. Kaye's Far Pavilions was great fun to read, for example.

I just found SV to be a bit dry and had a tendency to wander all over the place. But that's just my taste. I did enjoy a couple of his ex-wife Marianne's books, although she's a bit heavy on the liberal symbolism.

40 posted on 03/09/2007 11:48:40 PM PST by Allegra (Hey! Quiet Down Out There!)
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To: DryFly

Atlas Shrugged is up there. That speech at the end that seems to go on for dozens of pages, that was hard to get through.


41 posted on 03/09/2007 11:48:53 PM PST by KellyAdmirer
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To: AnotherUnixGeek
Foucault's Pendulum - Umberto Eco

I'm on page 50. I think you have freed me from the necessity of continuing.

42 posted on 03/09/2007 11:49:36 PM PST by Stentor
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To: Blind Eye Jones

Ulysses(oh heck, anything by...)--James Joyce
The Sound and The Fury--Faulkner

It's the dang phonetic slang that riles me.


43 posted on 03/09/2007 11:49:58 PM PST by SoDak
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To: Blind Eye Jones

44 posted on 03/09/2007 11:50:27 PM PST by oldleft
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To: Mr. Mojo

I agree with you about Joyce and "Finnegan's Wake." I guess I'm too impatient to appreciate avant-garde literature and "stream of consiousness" writing. I'm just old fashioned enough to not want to have to read a dozen critical reviews and explanations of "keys" to symbolisms, etc., that explain to me what the author really means.
To me, it's analogous to being instructed in the meaning of hieroglyphics.


45 posted on 03/09/2007 11:50:38 PM PST by T.L.Sink
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To: Blind Eye Jones
two books come to mind:
1. Soldier of Arete by Gene Wolf
2. A Night of Serious Drinking by René Daumal.
Both are convoluted but well worth the effort...
46 posted on 03/09/2007 11:50:49 PM PST by zadox
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To: Blind Eye Jones
The San Francisco Yellow Pages.

Excluding the impenetrable part, that is ...

47 posted on 03/09/2007 11:52:24 PM PST by SFConservative
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To: Allegra
Anything by Virginia Woolf.

Anything by Tom Wolfe.

L

48 posted on 03/09/2007 11:53:42 PM PST by Lurker (Calling islam a religion is like calling a car a submarine.)
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To: BnBlFlag

Don't say that! I bought it at a book sale because it was written by Solzhenitsyn and haven't read it yet.

But I guess it's no great waste even if the book isn't that good, seeing as I only paid fifty cents.


49 posted on 03/09/2007 11:54:06 PM PST by Irish Rose (Will work for chocolate.)
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To: Blind Eye Jones
Nietzsche. "Thus Spoke Zarathustra" English and German versions

Some passages like "On the flies of the marketplace" are very clear, others are barely comprehensible.

50 posted on 03/09/2007 11:54:29 PM PST by StarfireIV (John Galt was an optimist.)
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