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To: El Cid
c) Time Dilation where time near the center of the universe (Earth)....

Do you really believe that the Earth is at or near the center of the universe?
50 posted on 03/26/2007 1:35:52 PM PDT by HaveHadEnough
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To: HaveHadEnough

Technically, the Earth is the centre of the universe, but so is everywhere else!
Since the Universe is infinite in size, every point in it is exactly the same distance from the edges, making every point in the universe simultaneously the centre!


65 posted on 03/26/2007 1:51:27 PM PDT by 49th (This space for rent.)
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To: HaveHadEnough
Do you really believe that the Earth is at or near the center of the universe?

At this point in time I'm fairly agnostic on getting into the exact details about how "God did it". It is interesting, though, that some evidence exists that indicates this to be so (TJ 2002):

Astronomers have long observed that light from distant galaxies is usually redshifted. That is, their light spectrum is 'redder' (i.e. a longer wavelength) than light from similar light sources near Earth. According to the law developed by astronomer Edwin Hubble (after whom the Hubble telescope is named), the redshifts are progressively larger for galaxies progressively further away.

Over the last few decades, astronomers have discovered that the redshifts of the galaxies are not evenly distributed but are 'quantized', i.e., they tend to fall into distinct groups. This means that the distances to the galaxies also fall into groups, with each group of galaxies forming a conceptual spherical shell. The shells turn out to be about a million light-years apart.

It is remarkable that the shells are all concentric and all centered on our home galaxy, the Milky Way. If they weren't, we would not see groups of redshifts. Russ Humphreys shows that groups would only be distinct from each other if our viewing location were less than a million light years (a trivial distance on the scale of the universe) from the center.

The odds for the Earth having such a unique position in the cosmos by accident are less than one in a trillion. The problem for big bang theorists is that they suppose the cosmos was not created but happened by accident—by chance, natural processes. Such naturalistic processes could not have put us at a unique center, so atheistic cosmologists have sought other explanations, without notable success so far.

123 posted on 03/26/2007 10:03:22 PM PDT by El Cid (Seek ye the LORD while He may be found, call ye upon Him while He is near:)
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To: HaveHadEnough

"Do you really believe that the Earth is at or near the center of the universe?"

If the universe is an ever-expanding ball of time and space, "center" depends completely upon one's perspective. It is as logical to assume that it is as much as anything else that might be.


182 posted on 03/27/2007 2:55:43 PM PDT by Stingray ("Stand for the truth or you'll fall for anything.")
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