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Poland closes Russian exposition in Auschwitz
Russia-InfoCentre ^ | 3.04.2007

Posted on 04/03/2007 12:31:21 PM PDT by lizol

Poland closes Russian exposition in Auschwitz

3.04.2007

The administration of the museum in the former Auschwitz concentration camp has decided to close the Russian exposition and says it can be reopened only if Russia acknowledges occupation of Poland by the USSR.

Citizenship of the concentration camp's victims appeared to be a stumbling block for the museum's administration. People burnt in the camp are listed as "USSR citizens" on the Russian stands at the museum which is not true according to the directorate of the memorial. Besides, the museum's representatives claim that while preparing exposition materials Russians gave wrong numbers of victims and wrong names of the settlements victims were brought to Auschwitz from.

Elena Ignatenko, the administrator of the Obelisk – centre which prepared the Russian exposition in Auschwitz, says all exposition materials were in detail coordinated with the museum, and all papers and documents were approved by the Polish side.


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; Russia
KEYWORDS: auschwitz; poland; russia
Statement on the exhibition entitled, “Martyrdom of the USSR nations during the Great Patriotic War in the years 1941-1945”

The so-called national exhibitions have been located on the grounds of the former Auschwitz I camp since 1960. Those exhibitions were prepared by some of the countries which had been occupied by German Nazis during World War II and whose citizens had been deported to Auschwitz.

In recent years new exhibitions have replaced the old ones, being mounted – among others – by Slovakia, Czech Republic, France, Belgium and the Netherlands. According to a standard procedure the national exhibitions are organized in cooperation between the Auschwitz-Birkenau Museum and the representative of a given state.

The first national exhibition of the then USSR was opened in the Museum in 1961. It was partially reorganized in 1977, and completely changed in 1985.

In 2003 the Russian party put a proposal to create a new exhibition and as a result the former exhibition was closed.

While developing the new exhibition in 2004 the Museum was given its scenario. At that time divergences arose concerning some matter-of-fact issues between the Russian party and the Museum, and to date the problem has remained unsolved.

The divergences concern the nomenclature used in relation to the population and territories, which – due to the USSR activities resulting from the Ribbentropp-Molotov pact – came under its control in the years 1939-1941. They included the Baltic States, eastern territories of the Republic of Poland and a part of Romania, whose population by no means can be viewed as USSR citizens as they did not renounce voluntarily their former citizenship and did not accept, as the result of an independent decision, the Soviet citizenship.

The position of the Museum is supported by the International Auschwitz Council headed by Prof. Władysław Bartoszewski. The Council comprises former prisoners of the Auschwitz-Birkenau camp as well as historians and experts in the field from various countries.

Talks with the Russian party are in progress. They aim at finding a comprehensive solution taking into account various sensitivities of all involved parties which will make it possible to open the exhibition to visitors.

On January 27, 2006, during the 60th anniversary of the Auschwitz liberation, the uncompleted exhibition was visited by Wladimir Putin, President of the Russian Federation. The President was informed that the exhibition had not been completed by that time and therefore remained closed to visitors.

http://www.auschwitz.org.pl/new/index.php?tryb=news_big&language=EN&id=1256
1 posted on 04/03/2007 12:31:22 PM PDT by lizol
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To: HungarianGypsy; LadyPilgrim; vox_PL; 1234; ChiMark; IslandJeff; rochester_veteran; NinoFan; ...
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2 posted on 04/03/2007 12:39:33 PM PDT by lizol (Liberal - a man with his mind open ... at both ends)
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To: lizol

I love the spine that Poland has been showing for the past few years... but this seems just a little petty to me.


3 posted on 04/03/2007 12:51:04 PM PDT by Teacher317 (Are you familiar with the writings of Shan Yu?)
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To: lizol

I’ve actually had arguments/discussions with liberals and leftists who don’t know that the USSR invaded Poland at the same time the Germans did in 1939.


4 posted on 04/03/2007 3:00:03 PM PDT by Guy in Bumblebee Suit
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To: Teacher317

“but this seems just a little petty to me.”

Why ?


5 posted on 04/03/2007 4:43:57 PM PDT by Grzegorz 246
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To: lizol

The divergences concern the nomenclature used in relation to the population and territories, which – due to the USSR activities resulting from the Ribbentropp-Molotov pact – came under its control in the years 1939-1941. They included the Baltic States, eastern territories of the Republic of Poland and a part of Romania, whose population by no means can be viewed as USSR citizens as they did not renounce voluntarily their former citizenship and did not accept, as the result of an independent decision, the Soviet citizenship. ==

Lizol I beleive that Russia will agree on Polish demands here. Let it be. After all so called “estern polish lands” are not in Russia. So it will mean the territorial claims of Poland to Ukraien, Belorus, Lithvinia. From russian view it is not bad:).


6 posted on 04/04/2007 3:12:08 AM PDT by RusIvan (The western MSM zombies the western publics.)
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To: Grzegorz 246

Doesn’t it feel like a kid saying “I’ll take my football and go home if you don’t admit that you went out of bounds on that last play!”?

If Russia makes a simple verbal admission, then they go back to the status quo. Clearly, it isn’t a terribly substantive problem.


7 posted on 04/04/2007 9:05:48 AM PDT by Teacher317 (Are you familiar with the writings of Shan Yu?)
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To: Teacher317
Fist of all It’s not “Poland”, but the Auschwitz museum and Its council, which is still largely run by ex-prisoners. And It’s about things like saying that Poles from areas seized by the Soviet Union in 39, who were killed in the camp were “Soviet citizens” - according to this logic Germans could claim that Poles or Jews from areas occupied by the 3rd Reich are “German victims”. So where’s the problem ?
8 posted on 04/04/2007 12:40:02 PM PDT by Grzegorz 246
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