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To: Ethan Clive Osgoode
There is a definite link between evolutionary theory and eugenics, quite naturally, and especially among those who considered themselves intellectuals. However, I'd argue that selective breeding, and human slavery are the true parents of eugenics.

To further support your point, from wikipedia:

"Breeding of human beings was suggested at least as far back as Plato, but the modern field and term was first formulated by Sir Francis Galton in 1865, drawing on the recent work of his cousin Charles Darwin. From its inception eugenics was supported by prominent thinkers, including Alexander Graham Bell, George Bernard Shaw, and Winston Churchill. Financial support for the advocacy of eugenics came from the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Harriman interests. Eugenics was an academic discipline at many colleges and universities. Its scientific reputation started to tumble in the 1930s, a time when Ernst Rüdin began incorporating eugenic rhetoric into the racial policies of Nazi Germany."

Also, there was a definite link between Sanger (planned parenthood) and Eugenics.

4 posted on 04/04/2007 11:30:42 PM PDT by amchugh (large and largely disgruntled)
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To: amchugh; metmom; DaveLoneRanger
Also, there was a definite link between Sanger (planned parenthood) and Eugenics.

Many of the early members of the IPPF and the Margaret Sanger Research Bureau were also members of the (British) Eugenics Society. Margaret Sanger herself was a Life Fellow. She was also a member of the American Eugenics Society.

Julian Huxley, another biologist of unimpeachable darwinian credentials, was an important figure in this sordid history.

Like his grandfather T. H. Huxley, Julian Huxley rose to be one of the most (if not the most) influential evolutionary biologists of his time. He collaborated with H.G. Wells (one of Margaret Sanger' lovers) and J.S. Haldane on The Science of Life, a work which helped fossilized various "icons of evolution" into the public mind until this very day. Julian Huxley was a key figure in the formulation of the "modern synthesis" of darwinism. In fact, he wrote a book called just that: Evolution: The Modern Synthesis (1942). Indeed the very term "modern synthesis" is, I think, due to Julian. Huxley also popularized the works of Teilhard de Chardin (of Piltdown man fame).

From 1931-1962, Julian Huxley served various positions in the Eugenics Society, as a fellow, as a member of the council, as vice-president, and president. He was also on the executive committee of the Euthanasia Society, and was vice president of the Abortion Law Reform Society. Huxley was involved in the creation of UNESCO and was the its first director general from 1946-1948. He also co-founded the World Wide Fund for nature and signed Humanist Manifesto II. As late as the 1960s, Huxley was still openly advocating eugenics: Eugenics in Evolutionary Perspective (Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 6 (2): 155-87, Winter 1963.) Huxley's views on population, birth control, sterilization, euthanasia, etc. are hardly different from Sanger's.

Julian Huxley was a long-time friend of Konrad Lorenz, who, for a while, went a little astray with Nazi "racial hygene" theoretical work. Huxley's archive of correspondence is immense and includes practically all the who's who of the darwinian world: the Darwin family, Gavin de Beer, Theodore Dobzhansky, Richard Goldschmidt, Jane Goodall, Earnst Haeckel, J.B.S. Haldane, Louis Leaky, Ernst Mayr, George Gaylord Simpson, Teilhard de Chardin, H.G. Wells, and Margaret Sanger.

But all that is merely a coincidence.

15 posted on 04/05/2007 9:42:17 PM PDT by Ethan Clive Osgoode
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